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IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering

Issue 1 • Jan 1993

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • On satisfying timing constraints in hard-real-time systems

    Publication Year: 1993, Page(s):70 - 84
    Cited by:  Papers (99)  |  Patents (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1492 KB)

    The authors explain why pre-run-time scheduling is essential if one wishes to guarantee that timing constraints will be satisfied in a large complex hard-real-time system. They examine some of the major concerns in pre-run-time scheduling and consider what formulations of mathematical scheduling problems can be used to address those concerns. This work provides a guide to the available algorithms View full abstract»

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  • Stepwise design of real-time systems

    Publication Year: 1993, Page(s):56 - 69
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1404 KB)

    The joint action approach to modeling of reactive systems is presented and augmented with real time. This leads to a stepwise design method where temporal logic of actions can be used for formal reasoning, superposition is the key mechanism for transformations, the advantages of closed-system modularity are utilized, logical properties are addressed before real-time properties, and real-time prope... View full abstract»

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  • State-based model checking of event-driven system requirements

    Publication Year: 1993, Page(s):24 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (82)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1340 KB)

    It is demonstrated how model checking can be used to verify safety properties for event-driven systems. SCR tabular requirements describe required system behavior in a format that is intuitive, easy to read, and scalable to large systems (e.g. the software requirements for the A-7 military aircraft). Model checking of temporal logics has been established as a sound technique for verifying properti... View full abstract»

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  • Specifying and verifying requirements of real-time systems

    Publication Year: 1993, Page(s):41 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (49)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1120 KB)

    An approach to specification of requirements and verification of design for real-time systems is presented. A system is defined by a conventional mathematical model for a dynamic system where application specific states denote functions of real time. Specifications are formulas in duration calculus, a real-time interval logic, where predicates define durations of states. Requirements define safety... View full abstract»

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  • The infeasibility of quantifying the reliability of life-critical real-time software

    Publication Year: 1993, Page(s):3 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (147)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (880 KB)

    This work affirms that the quantification of life-critical software reliability is infeasible using statistical methods, whether these methods are applied to standard software or fault-tolerant software. The classical methods of estimating reliability are shown to lead to exorbitant amounts of testing when applied to life-critical software. Reliability growth models are examined and also shown to ... View full abstract»

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  • Formal verification of algorithms for critical systems

    Publication Year: 1993, Page(s):13 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (37)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1124 KB)

    The authors describe their experience with formal, machine-checked verification of algorithms for critical applications, concentrating on a Byzantine fault-tolerant algorithm for synchronizing the clocks in the replicated computers of a digital flight control system. The problems encountered in unsynchronized systems and the necessity, and criticality, of fault-tolerant synchronization are describ... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
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tse-eic@computer.org