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Technology and Society Magazine, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Spring 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
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  • Information for Authors

    Page(s): C2
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • Society Listing

    Page(s): 2
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  • ISTAS 2010 CFP

    Page(s): 3
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  • Technology and Society: Building Our Sociotechnical Future (Johnson, D.G. and Wetmore, J.M.; 2009) [Book Review]

    Page(s): 4 - 8
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  • Volunteerism and Humanitarian Engineering - Part II [Guest Editors' Introduction]

    Page(s): 9 - 11
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  • IEEE-SSIT On-Line Resources [News and Notes]

    Page(s): 11
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  • Humanitarian Engineering in Spain: Ingenieros sin Fronteras

    Page(s): 12 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2325 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    ISF (Ingenieros sin fronteras) is an Spanish NGO. ISF deals with humanitarian engineering. The association aspires to help integrate cultural, political, social, economical, and environmental contexts into technology, and to use technology for the service of human development. ISF's activities involve development programs, education, social awareness efforts, networking and institutional relations. View full abstract»

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  • Ingenieurs Sans Frontieres in France: From Humanitarian Ideals to Engineering Ethics

    Page(s): 20 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (860 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper discusses about the French non-governmental organization (NGO) "Ingenieurs Sans Fronfieres" (ISF) which was the first institutional endeavor of humanitarian engineering in France. The group's manifold difficulties and a profound identity crisis have prompted significant debates in the organization about humanitarian ethics and the role of technology in society. These debates, in turn, have led to an original approach towards engineering ethics and a wider concern about the social responsibility of engineers, as embodied in the concept of the "citizen engineer". View full abstract»

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  • From Boy Scouts and Missionaries, to Development Partners

    Page(s): 27 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (399 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In the 1980s and 1990s, Belgian engineering associations launched initiatives enabling engineers to engage as volunteers in projects of development cooperation. Since then, these organizations have observed a noticeable evolution, both conceptually (in the way development aid or development cooperation is understood) and operationally (in the way projects are managed and executed). This article discusses the status of these organizations, interprets evolutions and differences, and concludes with initiatives in which "humanitarian engineering" is introduced during the initial training of engineers. View full abstract»

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  • Disability and Technology: Engineering a More Equitable Ireland

    Page(s): 35 - 41
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (399 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Many of the practical difficulties faced by people with disabilities can be addressed through development, provision, and promotion of assistive technology. Engineers who are not directly involved in the disability sector should be aware that by designing devices, environments, and amenities so that they are accessible to people with the widest range of abilities, they can promote greater equality of opportunity in education, employment, and citizenship for disabled people. View full abstract»

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  • Telehealth in Sub-Saharan Africa: Lessons for Humanitarian Engineering

    Page(s): 42 - 49
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (852 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper discussed the sudden influx of modern communications has opened up exciting opportunities for humanitarian engineering a field that many engineers associate with installation of water and sanitation facilities in rural areas to adapt mobile communications technologies to address the urgent health needs of this impoverished region. In reviewing the current progress of cell phone telehealth in sub-Saharan Africa, it can be argued that despite much enthusiasm, and considerable hyperbole, about the technology, the contribution of cell phone telehealth to the health of the population in developing countries is difficult to predict. On a smaller scale, however, individual engineers have carried out exciting projects and there clearly is an opportunity for more work by volunteer engineers. View full abstract»

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  • PIPWatch Toolbar: Using Social Navigation to Enhance Privacy Protection and Compliance

    Page(s): 50 - 57
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (900 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The main goal of this project is to evaluate the prospects of combining social navigation techniques into a PET that helps Internet users identify which Websites comply with Canadian privacy legislation and to honor the concerns common among Canadians who conduct personal transactions via the Web. Our PIPWatch tool allows users to collect and share information about the privacy practices of various Websites. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Proceedings [advertisement]

    Page(s): 57
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  • Knowledge-Sharing Successes in Web 2.0 Communities

    Page(s): 58 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (818 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Knowledge sharing in contemporary research is seen largely as a particular kind of "social dilemma" the public goods problem. Because people can benefit from public goods whether they contribute to them or not, there will always be the temptation to free-ride off the contributions of others. Knowledge-sharing behavior is scarcer that many would prefer, according to this argument, because of an incentive problem. The incentive problem can be overcome either by increasing the benefits to individual contributors, or by encouraging more pro-social behavior through group identity or other social processes. While most knowledge management research has focused on shared repositories within organizations, a potentially new form of knowledge sharing within, between, and outside of organizations has recently emerged: online content sharing communities using Web 2.0 technologies. How is knowledge sharing in Web 2.0 communities different? Do Web 2.0 communities solve certain classic knowledge management problems, or do they create new barriers to knowledge sharing? View full abstract»

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  • 2010 IEEE Conference on Innovative Technologies for an Efficient and Reliable Electricity Supply

    Page(s): C3
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  • IEEE Filler

    Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Technology and Society Magazine covers the impact of technology (as embodied by the fields of interest in IEEE) on society

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Katina Michael
School of Information Systems and Technology
University of Wollongong