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Microwave Magazine, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date April 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 33
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 3 - 4
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  • Where to Go [From the Editor's Desk]

    Page(s): 6 - 40
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  • Time-Domain Modeling Techniques for Microwave Engineering [From the Guest Editor's Desk]

    Page(s): 10 - 14
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  • Publish or Perish? [Microwave Surfing]

    Page(s): 16 - 40
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  • Waving Back [Microwave Bytes]

    Page(s): 20 - 32
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  • Introducing the 2010 MTT-S Education Committee Members [Education News]

    Page(s): 34 - 40
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  • IMS 2010

    Page(s): 39
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  • 2010 MTT-S-Sponsored IEEE Fellows [MTT-S Society News]

    Page(s): 41
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  • Keeping Time with Maxwell's Equations

    Page(s): 42 - 49
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5063 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Introducing a commercial FETD solver breaks new ground in EM field simulation. Based on the DGTD method, it allows unstructured geometry-conforming meshes to be used for the first time in transient EM field simulation. Since the underlying method doesn't require the solution of a large matrix equation, its computer memory usage is modest. Simulation speed is optimized without compromising accuracy or stability by introducing an innovative local timestepping procedure. In this procedure, small time steps are taken only where needed in small mesh elements while appropriately larger time steps are used in larger mesh elements. Furthermore, a local implicit time-stepping algorithm is employed with selected elements to further improve simulation speed. DGTD is a competitive alternative to traditional FDTD-based methods to solving Maxwell's equations in the time domain. The applications presented here include the electromagnetic pulse susceptibility of the differential lines in a laptop computer, the radar signature of a landmine under undulating ground,the TDR of a bent flex circuit, and the return loss of a connector. All of these examples involve complicated/ curved geometries where the flexibility of the unstructured meshes used in DGTD provides powerful advantages over simulation by conventional brickshaped FDTD and FIT meshes. View full abstract»

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  • FDTD for Nanoscale and Optical Problems

    Page(s): 50 - 59
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    In this article, we have demonstrated that many representative problems of optical technologies can be accurately and effectively solved with the commercially available FDTD software, provided that such software offers the flexibility applying partial analytical knowledge to the problems. This is the case with scalar 2-D or guided 2-D FDTD algorithms relevant to the analysis of PhCs or microstructured optical fibers, as well as periodic FDTD method applicable in the scatterometry of ICs. We have also demonstrated an effective approach of hybridizing the FDTD and scalar Fresnel approaches for accurate and effective modeling of lens imaging phenomena. We believe that further developments along these lines using FDTD methods, supported by the concurrent developments in computer technology, will lead to hybrid time-domain software tools becoming a breakthrough in optics and photonics. View full abstract»

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  • It's About Time

    Page(s): 60 - 69
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3292 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In the past years, time-domain methods have reached a level of maturity that makes them most suitable for the simulation of a variety of EM devices. They have a number of advantages: capability of simulating truly gigantic structures, due to their high simulation speed and low memory consumption; ability to furnish broadband results in a single simulation run; and, more recently, they offer good accuracy in the approximation of problem geometry through improved meshing techniques adapted to arbitrary surfaces. In the time domain, EM simulations can most naturally be coupled to simulations in other domains of physics. This broadens their domain of applicability to entire technical systems and allows a variety of physical effects to be taken into account in the design stage. This article on time-domain methods should not let the reader forget that frequency-domain methods also have great advantages and that, for specific devices or simulation types, a frequency-domain method might be the best or the only one applicable. However, we do live in a time-domain world. To quote E. Bogatin [23]: "The most important quality of the frequency domain is that it is not real. It is a mathematical construct. The only reality is the time domain." View full abstract»

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  • Speed It Up

    Page(s): 70 - 78
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2985 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    GPUs are cost-effective solutions for hardware acceleration of the FDTD algorithm. The acceleration of FDTD on GPUs has made the algorithm more available and affordable with endless possible applications. Hardware acceleration has brought the power of supercomputing to the desktop. View full abstract»

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  • Exploit the Parallel Paradigm

    Page(s): 79 - 85
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3304 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Transmission line matrix (TLM) methods are powerful numerical procedures for modeling electromagnetic fields in the time domain. The theoretical foundations of various TLM methods are well described in the literature, but to develop general purpose simulation software based on the procedures is still a challenging task. The computational electromagnetics industry is by and large responsible for implementing the procedures in commercially available software. However, many open-source and free software packages have been written by researchers; some of these packages also come with a graphical user interface.The finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique and TLM methods are two similar time-domain numerical procedures for modelling electromagnetic fields. Instead of updating the electric and magnetic field quantities as is done in the FDTD procedure, TLM methods update the voltage quantities using a voltage scattering procedure. Electric and magnetic field quantities are not needed to carry out the scattering process; the field quantities of course can be obtained from the voltage quantities if needed. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Region 10 MTT-S Chapter Chair Meeting Report [Around the Globe]

    Page(s): 86 - 88
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  • IEEE WAMICOM

    Page(s): 87
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  • Workshop for Chapter Volunteers at IMS2010

    Page(s): 89
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  • Errata [for "Low-Noise Amplifier at 2.45 GHz" (Gawande, R. and Bradley, R.; Feb 09 122-126)]

    Page(s): 89
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    In the article "Low-Noise Amplifier at 2.45 GHz" by Rohit Gawande and Richard Bradley in the February 2010 issue of IEEE Micowave Magazine (vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 122-126), the callout was incorrect. The correct callout is presented here. Figure 3 was also incorrectly represented in the February issue and is shown correctly here. View full abstract»

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  • Technical Coordinating Committee [TCC Tidbits]

    Page(s): 90 - 91
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  • The 33rd IEEE Sarnoff Symposium

    Page(s): 91
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  • Overview of the 2009 RFIC Symposium [Conference Report]

    Page(s): 92 - 93
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  • Correction

    Page(s): 93
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    In "Siliconization of 60 GHz" by Ali M. Niknejad in the February 2010 issue of IEEE Microwave Magazine (vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 78-85), Figures 3 and 4 were missing the proper citation. View full abstract»

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  • Report on the TELSIKS 2009 Conference [Chapter News]

    Page(s): 94 - 95
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  • Serbia and Montenegro MTT-S Chapter [Chapter News]

    Page(s): 96
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  • 2010 IEEE Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits Symposium

    Page(s): 97
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Microwave Magazine is intended to serve primarily as a source of information of interest to professionals in the field of microwave theory and techniques.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
John Wood
Maxim Integrated Products, Inc.

San Jose, CA      USA
john.wood@ieee.org
Phone:+1 480 577 0927