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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 22 of 22
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): C1 - 1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management publication information

    Page(s): C2
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  • From the Editor

    Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • Editorial Managing Innovation in Emerging Economies: An Introduction to the Special Issue

    Page(s): 4 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (180 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The 11 papers in this special issue focus on managing innovation in emerging economies. The papers cover a good spectrum of topics, methodology, industry as well as geographical location. Collectively they draw observations from Brazil, China, India, Philippines, South Africa, and Taiwan. View full abstract»

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  • Hierarchical Segmentation of R&D Process and Intellectual Property Protection: Evidence From Multinational R&D Laboratories in China

    Page(s): 9 - 21
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    This paper examines how multinational corporations (MNCs) protect their intellectual property (IP) when they conduct R&D in countries with weak IP rights (IPRs) protection. Findings from a small-scale survey and three case studies in China show that hierarchical segmentation of the R&D process can provide an effective way for IPR protection. Furthermore, a modular R&D structure adopted by many information technology companies can facilitate the hierarchical segmentation. Because R&D is becoming distributed across locations with varying levels of IPR protection, a center-peripheral R&D organizational structure is emerging within MNCs as R&D globalization proceeds. View full abstract»

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  • Market Information and New Venture Performance: Differences Between Established and Emerging Technology Standards

    Page(s): 22 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (611 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The authors examine the significance of formal processes for market information acquisition and use as antecedents to success of Chinese new ventures. Building on insights from the entrepreneurial planning literature, the authors construct a theoretical model in which formal processes for market information and market utilization have direct, positive main effects on new venture financial performance, and in which the existence of an established technology standard has a direct effect on performance and also affects the relationship between market information processes and performance. The authors test hypotheses derived from the model using a dataset comprising 222 Chinese new ventures. Consistent with expectations, the authors find that new venture financial performance was positively associated with the use of formal processes for the generation of market information. However, the impact on performance of formal processes for market information utilization depended on the firm's technological environment. In particular, for firms facing an established technology standard, the use of formal processes for market information utilization did not significantly affect performance. In contrast, the use of formal processes for market information utilization had a significant impact on performance among ventures that faced an emerging technology standard. View full abstract»

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  • High-Technology Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies: Firm Informality and Contextualization of Resource-Based Theory

    Page(s): 39 - 50
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    High-technology entrepreneurship in emerging economies takes place in a context very different from that of developed economies. In large measure, this difference is due to greater resource constraints and higher levels of firm informality in emerging economies. In this study, we examine formal versus informal young high-technology ventures, assessing the extent to which firm informality moderates the relationship between technology investments and firm performance in an emerging economy. We find that technology investments are positively related to firm performance. Yet, firm informality positively moderates the relationship between resources and firm performance. The effect of resources tends to be contingent on the level of firm informality in an emerging economy. Greater resource constraints and higher levels of firm informality not only represent critical factors in emerging economies, but also are essential for contextualizing resource-based theory. View full abstract»

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  • How do Latecomer Firms Capture Value From Disruptive Technologies? A Secondary Business-Model Innovation Perspective

    Page(s): 51 - 62
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (489 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To fill the research gap between extant theory of disruptive technology and latecomer firms' business-model innovation practices in emerging economies, we explore the new latecomer advantage implied in the phenomena of overshooting and nonconsuming. Based on inductive theory building with a comparative case study, we find that latecomer firms, though disadvantaged in technological capabilities and market resources, can successfully introduce disruptive technologies from advanced economies into emerging economies through secondary business-model innovations. They provide cheaper, simpler, but good enough products or services that ordinary citizens in emerging economies can easily afford and access. How do latecomer firms capture value from disruptive technologies within the emerging economies context? While articulating an appropriate value proposition that is attractive for local customers is of great importance for those latecomer firms, they should also fully utilize strategic partners' complementary assets to build a unique value network embedded within local infrastructure. Thus, those latecomer firms tactfully bypass the substantial first-mover advantages and global advantages of multinational incumbents, and leverage their latecomer advantages such as low price and local savvy. Thus, latecomer firms should not ignore those disruptive growth opportunities within the large population of mass customers and nonconsumers in emerging economies. View full abstract»

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  • Organizational Learning, Internal Control Mechanisms, and Indigenous Innovation: The Evidence from China

    Page(s): 63 - 77
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (478 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Setting in China's emerging economy, this study examines the underlying working mechanisms through which acquisitive learning and experimental learning produce positive impacts on indigenous innovation. We theorize that behavior control and output control will have different moderating effects on the learning and indigenous innovation relationships. Empirical analyses of a survey dataset of 607 Chinese firms provide supporting evidence to the theoretical model advanced in this study. Experimental learning mediates the relationship between acquisitive learning and indigenous innovation. Behavior control negatively moderates the relationship between acquisitive learning and indigenous innovation, while positively moderates the relationship between experimental learning and indigenous innovation. The moderating effects of output control on the relationships between both types of learning and indigenous innovation are significant and inverse-U-shaped. The paper concludes with a discussion of the relevant theoretical contributions and practical implications stemming from these findings, study limitations, and potential future research directions. View full abstract»

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  • Global R&D Alliances in China: Collaborations With Universities and Research Institutes

    Page(s): 78 - 87
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    A learning perspective was applied to examining when multinational corporations select universities rather than local firms as partners in international R&D alliances. Data were collected on 327 international R&D alliances established over the 1995-2001 period in China, an emerging economy where intellectual property rights protection is still far from adequate, over the 1995-2001 period. The effects of factors such as the international investor's host country R&D experience and the venture's research objectives on the selection of universities or research institutes as local partners for R&D alliances were analyzed. Analysis using logistic regression models suggests that the contribution of local universities and research institutes to such R&D collaborations is likely to be high when foreign investors have had abundant prior R&D experience in the host country and when the alliance has been established primarily for research rather than development purposes. The implications for theory, practice, and policymaking are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Competitive Advantages in the First Product of New Ventures

    Page(s): 88 - 102
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    The new venture launching its first product faces substantial risks and is typically resource-poor. Moreover, failure with the first product is closely related to failure of the new venture itself, as investors seek alternate investments with better track records. While much guidance appears in the literature for large, established firms developing and launching new products, little research has examined the specific challenges faced by entrepreneurial startups launching first products. We develop a model of competitive advantage for studying the development of the new venture's first product. We identify and investigate the skills, resources, and knowledge needed for achieving positional advantage and, ultimately, developing a successful first product. We collect data from 694 first products launched by new ventures in China to test our model. While most of our hypotheses are supported, we obtain some interesting findings regarding the stage in the development process when technology resources and skills, and marketing resources and skills have the greatest effects on product performance. Our research makes several contributions to engineering management, innovation, and entrepreneurship literatures. Finally, we provide managerial insights on how the entrepreneur should acquire resources and knowledge in order to improve the performance of the first product. View full abstract»

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  • The Relationship Between R&D Investment and Firm Profitability Under a Three-Stage Sigmoid Curve Model: Evidence From an Emerging Economy

    Page(s): 103 - 117
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (465 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The relationship between investment in research and development (R&D) and firm performance has been the subject of numerous academic investigations, but the findings of these investigations have varied greatly, with research revealing a number of different patterns in the R&D-performance relationship. This inconsistency may be partly attributable to the failure of the commonly used linear modeling method to capture the full dynamics of the R&D-performance relationship. Based on the sigmoid (S) curve paradigm, as well as on other economic foundations, this study proposes the use of a three-stage S-curve model to help reconcile the disparities in the literature. This S-curve model shows that the relationship between R&D intensity and firm profitability is nonlinear, with the slope negative at low levels (stage 1), positive at medium levels (stage 2), and negative again at high levels of R&D investment (stage 3). Empirical evidence from a sample of 377 publicly listed Taiwanese high-tech manufacturing firms and 179 nonhigh-tech firms, examined during the period between 2000 and 2007, confirmed our proposed model. This study not only establishes a relationship pattern that differs from that shown in past studies, but also has important managerial implications for R&D managers and important policy implications for governments. View full abstract»

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  • The Evolution of the Intellectual Property Management Strategy of an Emerging Multinational: Learning the Purpose of Patenting and Scientific Publications

    Page(s): 118 - 131
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    The transition from developing country technology firm to true multinational requires both an upgrading of the underlying capability base and an understanding of the purpose of IP management. Through a detailed case study of Sasol, a leading R&D firm from South Africa, this paper tracks the coevolution of IP management with technological advancement amid the constraints of the developing country context. Using interviews, annual reports, patent, and scientific publication data, this study suggests that the value of formal IP extends beyond appropriation of own capabilities. Importantly, patents and publications also serve to signal capabilities in an attempt to gain legitimacy among peers. Fundamentally, IP management involves a social process, where firms learn to manage the sharing of key capabilities-with the attendant competition/cooperation tension-to peers. View full abstract»

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  • The Outsourcing of “Creative” Work and the Limits of Capability: The Case of the Philippines’ Animation Industry

    Page(s): 132 - 143
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    The animation industry, like many information-technology-enabled services sectors, has been of interest to many developing countries interested in developing services outsourcing industries. We analyze the case of the Philippines' animation industry. This paper investigates the outsourcing process in animation and the nature of capabilities within that, with the goal of contributing to a more general understanding of services outsourcing. We examine the industry's history, interview data with industry participants, and secondary data. We find that strong labor force skills have been central to capabilities rather than organizational abilities. Outsourcing of production takes place only so far as the work is codifiable, i.e., instructions and interface documents, or that tacit interactions between providers and their clients can facilitate the transfer of the work. This makes it extremely difficult for the industry to move into higher value work such as the conceptualization stage of product development. A major downturn in the past and technological automation shows that the industry has not been sustainable in the face of external influences, but stronger policies and company strategies that support investments in upgrading capabilities and workforce skills could ameliorate some of these effects. A strong foreign presence has also been found to support the development of the industry. View full abstract»

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  • Resource-Constrained Innovation for Emerging Economies: The Case of the Indian Telecommunications Industry

    Page(s): 144 - 156
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    A daunting challenge that enterprises face today is how to design and diffuse innovations to effectively tap into local demand in emerging country markets. Although extant literature focuses on the dominant innovation models of multinational enterprises from developed countries, little attention is directed to carefully examining the alternative models of innovation offered by local players from emerging markets. The aim of our study was to gain an in-depth insight toward understanding ¿what kind of innovation models effectively suit emerging markets needs"? Using the case of an indigenous enterprise, Centre for Development of Telematics from India, we demonstrate how the emphasis on developing affordable and locally sustainable products has provided an alternative model of resource-constrained innovation in the telecommunications sector. The three critical factors for innovation were identified as: entrepreneurial leadership and vision; modular designs to meet user demands of affordability, functionality, and operability through architectural innovation; and exploitation of the local knowledge base and the creation of local innovation clusters. Our study provides insights into the labor-intensive, but capital-sensitive, processes involved in shaping and managing technology development and diffusion to meet the unique demands of mass markets in emerging economies. View full abstract»

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  • Journal subscription information

    Page(s): 157
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  • Forthcoming Engineering Management Conferences

    Page(s): 158 - 159
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  • Papers to be Published in Future Issues of IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management

    Page(s): 160 - 161
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  • Call for Papers 2011 IEEE International Technology Management Conference

    Page(s): 162
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  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management

    Page(s): 163 - 164
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  • IEEE Engineering Management Society Information

    Page(s): C3
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  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management information for authors

    Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E. 

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Rajiv Sabherwal
Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas