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IBM Journal of Research and Development

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 1977

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Application of Ink Jet Technology to a Word Processing Output Printer

    Page(s): 2 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (497 KB)  

    This paper describes a word processing system output printer that uses the electrostatic synchronous ink jet printing process. An overview of the ink jet matrix printing process is included, as well as brief descriptions of the elements of the printer. Printer performance objectives are outlined, and some of the design problems encountered during development are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Scale Model of an Ink Jet

    Page(s): 10 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (688 KB)  

    A scale model, approximately fifty times the size of its prototype, was used to study drop formation of an ink jet. Viscosity, surface tension, and inertial forces were modeled; gravity and air drag forces were not. The model accurately predicted operating conditions leading to the formation of undesirable satellite drops, thus permitting evaluation of measures designed to avoid them. View full abstract»

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  • Satellite Droplet Formation in a Liquid Jet

    Page(s): 21 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (557 KB)  

    The formation and behavior of satellite droplets in a liquid jet is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The satellite droplet break-off distance is measured stroboscopically as a function of the frequency and amplitude of nozzle vibration. A second-order analysis of spatial instability is developed, which demonstrates the essential features of satellite formation as it is observed. Satellite formation is least likely to occur when the main-drop spacing is five to seven times the jet diameter. View full abstract»

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  • Effect of Parameter Variations on Drop Placement in an Electrostatic Ink Jet Printer

    Page(s): 31 - 36
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (590 KB)  

    This paper discusses the sensitivity of drop-to-drop spacing in the print plane of an ink jet printer to other printer variables. Two designed experiments, a fractional factorial and a central composite, combined with standard analysis identified the critical variables and provided a mathematical expression useful for setting tolerances. View full abstract»

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  • Drop Charging and Deflection in an Electrostatic Ink Jet Printer

    Page(s): 37 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (908 KB)  

    This paper describes the drop charging and drop deflection processes in an electrostatic ink jet printer. Included in the discussion of drop charging are induction interaction effects and charge synchronization requirements, as well as design considerations for the charge electrode. In describing the parameters governing drop deflection, some drop placement errors are related to undesired interactions resulting from aerodynamic forces and electrostatic repulsion effects on the drops. A scheme for obtaining accurate drop placement in the presence of these interaction effects is described. View full abstract»

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  • Boundary Layer Around a Liquid Jet

    Page(s): 48 - 51
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (449 KB)  

    The phenomenon of air wake caused by a train of liquid drops is studied in this paper by approximating the train to a cylindrical jet emerging from a nozzle. The boundary layer equations are derived by applying continuity of jet mass and matching the loss of jet momentum with the air drag on the jet. These equations are solved numerically and compared with experiments in which the velocity change of the jet along the stream is carefully measured through measurements of drop distances. Good agreement is obtained between experimental results and the analysis. View full abstract»

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  • Controlling Print Height in an Ink Jet Printer

    Page(s): 52 - 55
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (488 KB)  

    This paper describes a control system for maintaining constant print height in an ink jet printer. Following power on and during a periodic off-line correction operation a specially designed sensor detects the position of a test group of electrostatically charged ink drops to obtain print height correction data. Information provided by the same sensor is used to synchronize the application of a unique charge to each drop to be printed. View full abstract»

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  • Study of Fluid Flow through Scaled-up Ink Jet Nozzles

    Page(s): 56 - 68
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1297 KB)  

    A 100-fold scaled-up model of ink jet nozzle flow is described. A theoretical justification for scaling the relevant parameters, starting from the equations of motion, is presented. The scaling procedure and the effects of unscaled parameters are discussed as well as the scaled-up “ink.” Following a description of the experimental apparatus, the results of a series of experiments are then presented. These consist of directionality, directional stability and flow efficiency measurements in four nozzle configurations: conical, cylindrical, square, and “hybrid” nozzles. View full abstract»

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  • Development and Characterization of Ink for an Electrostatic Ink Jet Printer

    Page(s): 69 - 74
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (590 KB)  

    This paper reviews the development of the ink for an electrostatic ink jet printer. It discusses the formulation logic, test procedures, failure analyses, and problem resolutions. The variables that influence the jet printing process and print quality are defined, and their relationship to specific formulations is discussed. Also considered are the relationships between formulation variables and failure modes inherent in the ink. View full abstract»

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  • Materials Selection for an Ink Jet Printer

    Page(s): 75 - 80
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (671 KB)  

    An ink jet printer includes a system of parts that supplies, filters, pumps, circulates, and pulses a jet of ink. These parts, made of various materials (metals, plastics, rubbers, adhesives), must satisfy the mechanical and electrical requirements of the system while being compatible with the chemical composition of the ink. This paper describes the selection and evaluation of these materials for a particular ink and printer design. View full abstract»

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  • Recent Papers by IBM Authors

    Page(s): 81 - 86
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (625 KB)  

    Reprints of the papers listed here may usually be obtained by writing directly to the authors. The authors' IBM divisions are identified as follows: DPD i s the Duta Processing Division; FED, Field Engineering Division; FSD, Federal Systems Division; GPD, General Products Division; GSD, General Systems Division; OPD, Ojice Products Division; RES, Research Division; SCD, System Communications Division: and SPD, System Products Division. Papers are listed alphabetically by name of journal. View full abstract»

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  • Recent IBM Patents

    Page(s): 87 - 90
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (377 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Authors

    Page(s): 91 - 93
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (322 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Errata [Erratum]

    Page(s): 94 - 95
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (218 KB)  
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  • Contents of previous issue

    Page(s): 96
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IBM Journal of Research and Development is a peer-reviewed technical journal, published bimonthly, which features the work of authors in the science, technology and engineering of information systems.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Clifford A. Pickover
IBM T. J. Watson Research Center