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IBM Systems Journal

Issue 1 • Date 1965

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • An interpretive program for matrix arithmetic

    Page(s): 2 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2490 KB)  

    The experimental matrix computation program described in this paper embodies dynamic memory allocation of all matrices, and enables the user to specify most matrix operations by using single-address pseudo instructions. Several different matrix types are allowed, and the most common matrix operations (addition, subtraction, right- and left-hand multiplication, transposition, inversion, solution of linear equations and eigenvalue/eigenvector computations) have been implemnented. If desired, additional matrix types and/or matrix operations may be incorporated. View full abstract»

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  • Algorithm for computer control of a digital plotter

    Page(s): 25 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1210 KB)  

    The algorithm can be programmed without the use of multiplication or division. It was found that 333 core locations were sufficient for an IBM 1401 program (used to control an IBM 1627). The average computation time between successive incrementations was approximately 1.5 milliseconds. View full abstract»

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  • An analysis of floating-point addition

    Page(s): 31 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1569 KB)  

    The major problem in designing a floating-point system is the addition operation. Knowledge of the relative importance of each of the suboperations can assist the designer in materially improving performance. Of special import are the provisions for shifting in pre-addition alignment of the operand radix points and in post-addition normalization of the result. Since these shifts vary over a wide range, provision must be made for the worst cases, without requiring the time of these extremes for all cases. View full abstract»

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  • On the reliability of polymorphic systems

    Page(s): 43 - 52
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1902 KB)  

    The paper provides an approximate reliability analysis of polymorphic systems and indicates, in a rough way, the reliability gains given by the essential features of such systems. A complete analysis of polymorphic systems would involve many considerations ignored here. View full abstract»

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  • A technique to control waiting time in a queue

    Page(s): 53 - 57
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1490 KB)  

    The technique outlined gives a solution to the problem of optimizing the service rate(s) in a queuing system according to the given criteria. It should be noted that this solution is suboptimal in several respects. Whereas the stated objective of the procedure is to make W → Wd, the procedure actually makes E((w − Wd)2)→O. The minimization of E((W − Wd)2) tends to weight deviations on either side of Wd equally. which implies that the cost of an item finishing ahead of schedule is the same as the cost of an item late by an equal time. View full abstract»

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  • Notes on testing real-time system programs

    Page(s): 58 - 72
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1786 KB)  

    Pending appearance in the literature of a systematic and complete treatment, these notes are intended as a partial check-list for the systems engineer installing a real-time system. Although based on the implementation of an airline reservation system, the notes are generally applicable to large systems of similar complexity. View full abstract»

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  • Serial compilation and the 1401 FORTRAN compiler

    Page(s): 73 - 80
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1432 KB)  

    The IBM 1401 FORTRAN compiler1 was designed as a set of phases that operate sequentially on the source program. The source program having been placed in core storage, the compiler phases enter core one at a time. Each phase overlays its predecessor, operates on the source program and, in turn, is overlaid by the next phase of the sequence. Thus, in contrast to the customary technique of passing the source program against the compiler in core, the compiler is passed against the source program which resides in core. It is assumed that the source program is more concise than the object program, and that an object program of interest can be accommodated in core. View full abstract»

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  • Authors

    Page(s): 81 - 82
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Contents of Volume 3, 1964

    Page(s): 83
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (1052 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
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Throughout its history, the IBM Systems Journal has been devoted to software, software systems, and services, focusing on concepts, architectures, and the uses of software.

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John J. Ritsko
IBM T. J. Watson Research Center5