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IBM Systems Journal

Issue 1 • Date 1982

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • Preface

    Page(s): 2 - 3
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (708 KB)  

    Only a few years ago the impact of computing on the organization was limited to specific application areas. We are now developing systems that broadly affect the entire structure. for such systems to be effective and lasting in their benefit, the total needs of the organization must be evaluated and considered in their development. This issue of the IBM Systems Journal is devoted to enterprise analysis techniques in recognition of their role in the development of systems that are responsive to the needs of the entire enterprise. View full abstract»

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  • Strategies for information requirements determination

    Page(s): 4 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1973 KB)  

    The problem to which the paper has been directed is the selection of an information requirements determination strategy. In developing the concept of strategy selection, the paper defines two levels of requirements: organizational information requirements and application-level requirements. The constraints on humans as specifiers of information requirements are explored. Four broad strategies for information requirements determination encompass groups of methods. These strategies are (1) asking, (2) deriving from an existing information system, (3) synthesis from characteristics of the utilizing system, and (4) discovering from experimentation with an evolving information system application. View full abstract»

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  • Business Systems Planning and Business Information Control Study: A comparison

    Page(s): 31 - 53
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1921 KB)  

    The area of enterprise analysis is in its formative stages. As the technology continues to mature and as industry evolves to later stages of learning with regard to managing data, the demand for greater levels of sophistication in enterprise ananlysis will increase. Enterprise-level dependencies will have to be identified and protected to provide for systems and data integration. Limited information systems resources will have to be effectively allocated. Short-term and long-term trade-offs will have to be made in determining the information system resource investment strategies. Holistic models of the business will be required to support the management planning and control apparatus. These issues will become more pressing over time and will precipitate substantial increases in the body of knowledge concerning enterprise analysis. View full abstract»

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  • Supporting Business Systems Planning studies with the DB/DC Data Dictionary

    Page(s): 54 - 80
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1940 KB)  

    We have shown an approach in which the IBM DB/DC Data Dictionary can be used as a tool to support Business Systems Planning studies. We have defined a BSP data model in terms of Dictionary subject categories, relationships, and attributes, and identified some of the useful reports that can be implemented as PAF programs. We have also discussed some of the operational issues involved in implementing this approach. Although this approach is only one of several possible, we believe it is a viable one which can contribute greatly to BSP studies. However, it has a greaterv alue in its potential too ffer an integrated approach for managing activities from the BSP study on through requirements definition, data base administration, systems design, development, and maintenance. The approach shown here, we feel, is the logical beginning of such an integrated approach to managing I/S activities. View full abstract»

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  • Towards an integrated development environment

    Page(s): 81 - 107
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2114 KB)  

    In this paper we have attempted to demonstrate two points: (1) that there is a need for increased attention to environment integration, and (2) that such integration requires a fundamental reworking of various approaches rather than the establishment of superficial connections. View full abstract»

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  • Enterprise information analysis: Cost-benefit analysis and the data-managed system

    Page(s): 108 - 123
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1667 KB)  

    A gradual evolution of systems design has occurred concurrently with the introduction of each new computer generation. The initial systems design was batch-oriented, largely a replacement of clerical functions supporting operational management, which lent itself well to a financial justification using classical cost-benefit analysis and which had virtually no intangible costs or benefits to consider. With the development of the facilities to support on-line systems came the development of “management information systems” and “management inquiry systems,” providing information and data as input to functional management for tactical planning. The intangible benefits of “better management decisions” were generally noted but not assigned a value in the cost-benefit analysis. The development of data-managed management information systems and decision support systems has extended information systems capabilities that provide the potential for integrated support of the strategic planning efforts of the enterprise. These systems cannot be cost-justified on the same basis as the “clerical function replacement” systems. From an accounting perspective, the costs (investments) should be treated differently. The benefits are intangible and, therefore, difficult to assess (1) in dollar terms and (2) in probability of occurrence; however, “hard” dollars will ultimately appear on the Profit and Loss Statement of the enterprise. (Table 1 provides a summary of the differences in the financial aspects of the systems.) View full abstract»

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  • Authors

    Page(s): 124 - 125
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Suggested reading

    Page(s): 126 - 128
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (986 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

Throughout its history, the IBM Systems Journal has been devoted to software, software systems, and services, focusing on concepts, architectures, and the uses of software.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
John J. Ritsko
IBM T. J. Watson Research Center5