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IBM Systems Journal

Issue 4 • Date 1993

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Preface

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 546 - 547
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1143 KB)  

    This issue presents three papers and three special contributions on software reuse, a paper on standardized (reference) designs for distributed systems applications, and two papers on advances in software systems for printing. The three special contributions introduce a new feature of the IBM Systems Journal, called Technical Forum. We are indebted to W. Tracz of the IBM Federal Systems Company in Owego, New York, for his solicitation and coordination of the reuse set, and to R. K. deBry of Pennant, the IBM Printing Systems Company, in Boulder, Colorado, for his involvement in and support of the papers on printing technology. View full abstract»

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  • Software reuse: From library to factory

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 548 - 566
    Cited by:  Papers (28)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3240 KB)  

    Systematic software reuse is a key business strategy that software managers can employ to dramatically improve their software development processes, to decrease time-to-market and costs, and to improve product quality. Effective reuse requires much more than just code and library technology. We have learned that careful consideration must be given to people, process, and technology. One approach to the systematic integration of these three elements is the concept of the software factory. At Hewlett-Packard Co., we have initiated a multifaceted corporate reuse program to help introduce the best practices of systematic reuse into the company, complemented by multidisciplinary research to investigate and develop better methods for domain-specific, reuse-based software engineering. This essay discusses our experiences. Key aspects include domain-specific kits, business modeling, organization design, and technology infrastructure for a flexible software factory. View full abstract»

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  • The business case for software reuse

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 567 - 594
    Cited by:  Papers (25)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3521 KB)  

    To remain competitive, software development organizations must reduce cycle time and cost, while at the same time adding function and improving quality. One potential solution lies in software reuse. Because software reuse is not free, we must weigh the potential benefits against the expenditures of time and resources required to identify and integrate reusable software into products. We first introduce software reuse concepts and examine the cost-benefit trade-offs of software reuse investments. We then provide a set of metrics used by IBM to accurately reflect the effort saved by reuse. We define reuse metrics that distinguish the savings and benefits from those already gained through accepted software engineering techniques. When used with the return-on-investment (ROI) model described in this paper, these metrics can effectively establish a sound business justification for reuse and can help assess the success of organizational reuse programs. View full abstract»

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  • Implementing Critical Success Factors in software reuse

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 595 - 611
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2520 KB)  

    Software reuse is one of several technologies that can improve quality and effectiveness of software development. The introduction of a reuse infrastructure within an existing organization and the associated modification of employee behavior and processes is a complex interdisciplinary task. The structuring and monitoring of several coordinated activities is required in order to be successful. This paper describes a practical application of the Critical Success Factors method on reuse technology insertion into the software development process. The Critical Success Factors method has proved to be a useful means for the introduction of software reuse concepts. Application of the method and results are discussed in detail, concluding with lessons learned and recommendations for similar efforts. View full abstract»

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  • Management of reuse at IBM [Technical forum]

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 612 - 615
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (1267 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Information reuse parallels software reuse [Technical forum]

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 615 - 620
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (1593 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A reusable parts center [Technical forum]

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 620 - 624
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (1371 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Application reference designs for distributed systems

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 625 - 646
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2945 KB)  

    This paper is based on the findings and conclusions of a client/server work group that was commissioned in 1991 to report IBM's technical strategy for client/server computing. Although there are countless variations for designing applications and interconnecting components in a distributed environment, there seems to be a finite number of variations that represent what a large majority of customers want to build. The intent of the work group was to explore the possibility of defining a set of application “reference designs,” which would represent the distributed designs that customers are building today or want to build in the near future. This paper documents the customer scenarios, the reference designs that represent them, and the requirements that were generated for the underlying system software. The work group concluded that the reference designs described herein represent our best working assumption about “where customers are going” with distributed application designs. The discussion should give those who have not yet begun to exploit distributed systems a starting point and considerations for their design work. View full abstract»

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  • Advanced Function Printing—From print to presentation

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 647 - 664
    Cited by:  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2346 KB)  

    The strength of Advanced Function Printing™ (AFP™) is due largely to the architectures that form its foundation. The architectures on which AFP is based have been developed over the last 12 years and have influenced the development of standards, competitive architectures, and, most importantly, software inside and outside IBM. Customers are demanding a more comprehensive view of printing that includes easy creation, viewing, and even specialized editing of printable documents. These “next generation” requirements are now being satisfied by software products that are based on the existing architecture. This paper describes some of these products and how they use the architecture, and describes possible future directions for AFP and related technologies. View full abstract»

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  • The continuing evolution of Advanced Function Printing

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 665 - 683
    Cited by:  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2698 KB)  

    Advanced Function Printing™ (AFP™) has become one of the de facto printing standards. It is a broad architecture to support printing across an entire enterprise and encompasses IBM architectures as well as industry standards. AFP had its beginnings in the IBM System/370™ environment in 1984 and has since expanded to include midrange and local area network systems. Recently the capabilities of AFP have been extended beyond printing to include on-line viewing and management of presentation data. An overview of AFP capabilities was given in an earlier issue of the IBM Systems Journal. This paper traces the continuing evolution of AFP and its usage and how it is addressing the presentation requirements of businesses in the 1990s. View full abstract»

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  • Books

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 684 - 686
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (1251 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Contents of Volume 32, 1993

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 687
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (1072 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

Throughout its history, the IBM Systems Journal has been devoted to software, software systems, and services, focusing on concepts, architectures, and the uses of software.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
John J. Ritsko
IBM T. J. Watson Research Center5