By Topic

IBM Systems Journal

Issue 1 • Date 1999

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Message from the General Manager, global Industries

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (768 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Preface

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 2 - 3
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (826 KB)  

    The creation of software from existing resources is a well-established part of programming and software engineering for reasons of quality, productivity, and rapid development and deployment. Progress on this broad approach to reuse began at the lowest levels of programming, such as code, and has slowly reached toward the highest levels of software, such as architecture. The ability to reuse architectural assets is a vital step in the effective, efficient development of new systems and solutions from all the work that has gone before. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Enterprise solutions structure

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 4 - 10
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2182 KB)  

    Enterprise Solutions Structure (ESS) is a major ISM initiative to establish a standard architectural framework to support creation, reuse, and maintenance of architecture and design assets for developing and delivering enterprise solutions. It draws on experiences with building customer solutions to distill “best practice” structures, models, and methods. The framework provides a rich set of architectural building blocks for solution architects and provides guidance on when and how to use this content to advantage. This paper gives an overview of ESS, describes the advantages of this approach, and serves as an introduction and context for some of the other papers in the issue. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A standard for business architecture description

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 12 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4159 KB)  

    A complete architectural specification of an information technology (IT) system includes information about how it is partitioned and how the parts are interrelated. It also contains information about what it should do and the purpose it must serve in the business. This paper provides a set of business concepts that partition the world of business meaning. It discusses the purpose of such an architectural view of business and ways in which it can be used. A set of generic concepts and their interrelationships organize business information content in terms of requirements on the business, the boundary of the business, and the business as a system for delivery of value. Methods are introduced to explore variations on the basic business concept patterns. These concepts are positioned to describe IT systems that support the business, and they are used to manage the work of IT system development and deployment. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A standard for architecture description

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 32 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3345 KB)  

    A profitable information technology (IT) services organization is dependent on widespread asset harvesting (from previous engagements) and scalable asset deployment (into current and future engagements). This activity demands consistency of terminology and notation in the creation and use of engagement artifacts, including work products. This paper presents a standard for architecture description in which a set of conventions for terminology and notation is used to describe and to express the organization of the architecture for an IT system. This standard, the Architecture Description Standard (ADS), is intended to be used by the IBM architecture community. The emphasis is on a minimal set of shared concepts that can be effectively taught to a broad range of IT architects with different skills and that is usable in practice. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Technical reference architectures

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 51 - 75
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5848 KB)  

    Today's approaches to solution development are still primarily based on “handcrafting”; and bear little relationship to the asset-based engineering methods so successfully used in other disciplines. In this paper we argue that these handcrafting approaches have passed their “sell-by” dates, and a more disciplined and constrained method of system development is needed. We focus particularly on the definition of technical architectures as the basis for constructing applications. We argue that a constrained set of reference architectures for a given set of problem domains is not only feasible, but mandatory for large-scale enterprise development, and we provide some example fragments of reference architectures for the administrative systems domain. These reference architectures and their successors, harvested and continually refreshed from successful consulting engagements, will form the basis of IBM's asset-based approach to solutions development in the future. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Solution customization

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 76 - 97
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3990 KB)  

    Customization involves fit and alterability and is based on understanding the commonality and variability (c/v) across industries, geographies, customers, and systems. This paper argues for an emphasis on c/v through a customization life cycle, from engineering customizable assets, components, and solutions to supporting their effective deployment. Examples of systems that focus on customization through c/v are given. These examples are described using the customization life cycle and show what mechanisms are most useful in each phase. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Experiences in reusing technical reference architectures

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 98 - 117
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5147 KB)  

    Despite significant investment, the promise of reuse in IT (information technology) solution development—shorter delivery times, cost reductions, risk mitigation—has seldom been realized in practice. The difficulties of reuse at the front end of the projects have overwhelmed the potential benefits downstream. Enterprise Solutions Structure (ESS) is designed to provide a rigorous and powerful structure to facilitate the sharing of experience and IT architectural assets across IBM's solutions development community worldwide. The key question this paper seeks to answer is, can the ESS approach address this very real barrier and deliver the promised value? Described here by the consultants involved are a number of customer engagements in which the early ESS work was exploited. We show how relevant assets could readily be identified and the value they contributed to both our clients and IBM at different stages of the full engagement life cycle—at bid/proposal time, in contract definition and scoping, and during the engagement—and the continuing benefit after the engagement. Finally, we outline some of the challenges yet to be addressed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Technical note—A proposal to simplify data flow diagrams

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 118 - 121
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1885 KB)  

    This technical note presents an adaptation of the data flow diagram (DFD) technique whereby each data store symbol represents a database rather than a single table. It is conjectured that this modification makes DFDs easier to create, understand, and maintain. It also reduces an overlap with the entity-relationship diagram technique by curtailing graphical manifestations of the data model in the DFD. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Books

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 122 - 124
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (1268 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Suggested reading

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 125
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (1002 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

Throughout its history, the IBM Systems Journal has been devoted to software, software systems, and services, focusing on concepts, architectures, and the uses of software.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
John J. Ritsko
IBM T. J. Watson Research Center5