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IBM Systems Journal

Issue 2 • Date 2002

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Message from the Senior Vice President and Group Executive, IBM Software Group

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 167
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Preface

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 168 - 169
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (29 KB)  

    As business-to-business interactions via the Internet become more dynamic, new developments in Web services and e-commerce support an increasing number of business transactions.Webservices, using standardized software mechanisms and protocols, are self-contained, modular applications dynamically accessible over a network that often provide the capability of facilitating a business transaction. Private trading exchanges and marketplaces promote e-commerce with the use of auctions and other trading methods to conduct transactions over the Internet. View full abstract»

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  • Introduction to Web services architecture

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 170 - 177
    Cited by:  Papers (60)  |  Patents (31)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (191 KB)  

    This paper introduces the major components of, and standards associated with, the Web services architecture. The different roles associated with the Web services architecture and the programming stack for Web services are described. The architectural elements of Web services are then related to a real-world business scenario in order to illustrate how the Web services approach helps solve real business problems. View full abstract»

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  • Developing XML Web services with WebSphere Studio Application Developer

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 178 - 197
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3029 KB)  

    Web services have recently emerged as a powerful technology for integrating heterogeneous applications over the Internet. The widespread adoption of Web services promises to usher in an exciting new generation of advanced distributed applications. These will support a new and growing set of specifications, such as Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP), Web Services Description Language (WSDL), and Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration (UDDI). Extensible Markup Language (XML) and its associated family of standards also play a central role in Web services by providing a data interchange format that is independent of both programming languages and operating systems. The application developer seeking to reap the benefits of Web services is therefore faced with a significant, and potentially steep, new learning curve. Clearly, application development tools that lower this barrier are crucial for the rapid and widespread adoption of Web services. This paper discusses the development tasks associated with XML Web services and describes a new suite of tools that improve developer productivity, by reducing the requirements for detailed knowledge of the underlying specifications and standards, and allow the developer to focus on the business problem domain. This suite of XML and Web services tools is part of IBM's recently released WebSphere® Studio Application Developer product, which is based on the new Eclipse open source tool integration platform. View full abstract»

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  • Web services and business process management

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 198 - 211
    Cited by:  Papers (70)  |  Patents (18)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (781 KB)  

    Web services based on the service-oriented architecture framework provide a suitable technical foundation for making business processes accessible within enterprises and across enterprises. But to appropriately support dynamic business processes and their management, more is needed, namely, the ability to prescribe how Web services are used to implement activities within a business process, how business processes are represented as Web services, and also which business partners perform what parts of the actual business process. In this paper, the relationship between Web services and the management of business processes is worked out and presented in a tutorial-like manner. View full abstract»

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  • Web services management approaches

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 212 - 227
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (7)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (259 KB)  

    Web services are important to business-to-business and business-to-consumer application deployment and are poised to be a critical aspect of the Web architecture of a business. Their reliable operation is required for the smooth and profitable operation of the business, mandating that Web services be well managed. This management includes controlling the life cycle of the service and collecting information about existence, availability, and health. All these activities can be accomplished in a manner specific to no particular vendor so that a number of management applications, such as those from Tivoli, can manage Web services in the context of the business applications of which they are components, as well as in relation to the other resources in the enterprise. View full abstract»

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  • Securing Web services

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 228 - 241
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (190 KB)  

    The Web service security challenge is to understand and assess the risk involved in securing a Web-based service today, based on our existing security technology, and at the same time track emerging standards and understand how they will be used to offset the risk in new Web services. Any security model must illustrate how data can flow through an application and network topology to meet the requirements defined by the business without exposing the data to undue risk. In this paper we propose a mechanism for the client to provide authentication data, based on the service definition, and for the service provider to retrieve those data. We also show how XML Digital Signatures and encryption can be exploited to achieve a level of trust. View full abstract»

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  • A platform for business-to-business sell-side, private exchanges and marketplaces

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 242 - 252
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (133 KB)  

    E-commerce, in terms of the monetary value of transactions, is heavily skewed toward business-to-business (B2B) commerce. Numerous B2B sites are already in existence, providing a fairly rich set of functionality for enabling simple or sophisticated trading of goods and services. In the coming years, we expect a strong growth in many kinds of B2B sites for trading, procurement, and sales. In this paper, we present a B2B platform suitable for various kinds of businesses such as large sellers, dealers, distributors, private exchanges, marketplaces, and procurement hubs. We present business scenarios, describe our design criteria, and present the architecture for the B2B platform. We discuss two major IBM offerings within the WebSphere® Commerce Suite product— WebSphere Commerce Suite, Marketplace Edition (MPE) and WebSphere Commerce Business Edition (BE)—that are based on this platform. We also present some experiences with and deployment of MPE for private exchanges and marketplace s. View full abstract»

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  • A framework-based approach to building private trading exchanges

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 253 - 271
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (303 KB)  

    The private trading exchange (PTX) is emerging as the cornerstone of business-to-business e-commerce. At its core, a private trading exchange involves interenterprise integration and collaboration. Our main objective in this paper is to introduce a versatile application platform for building private trading exchanges. This platform supports the management and execution of multienterprise business processes and collaborations in the context of these processes. We review the business requirements of PTX-based systems and the technical challenges in developing such systems. We then examine and categorize the main interaction patterns between the private trading exchange and its participants. These patterns lead to the design of a component framework for process brokering and content aggregation. This framework is the foundation of our application platform for building PTX solutions. We describe the platform and discuss how to use it to implement a PTX solution. View full abstract»

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  • E-commerce interoperability with IBM's WebSphere Commerce products

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 272 - 286
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (542 KB)  

    With the growth of the Internet, business-to-business procurement and other processes are being moved to the World Wide Web, for increased efficiency and reach. Procurement systems from different vendors use various protocols, and additional protocols are being defined by several industry consortia. As a consequence, suppliers are faced with the difficult task of supporting a large number of protocols in order to interoperate with various procurement systems and private marketplaces. In this paper, we outline the connectivity requirements for suppliers and private marketplaces, and we describe how suppliers and marketplaces based on IBM's WebSphere® Commerce Business Edition and WebSphere Commerce Suite, Marketplace Edition can interoperate with diverse procurement systems and electronic marketplaces. We first describe simple connectivity based on punchout processes for fixed and contract-based pricing. We then describe how asynchronous processes, such as requests for quote, auctions, and exchanges can be distributed for interoperability across suppliers and marketplaces. Finally, we describe B2B/M2M Protocol Exchange, a prototype we have implemented that maps between different, but analogous, protocols used in procurement systems, and thus alleviates some of the interoperability difficulties. View full abstract»

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  • Applications of flexible pricing in business-to-business electronic commerce

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 287 - 302
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (454 KB)  

    The increasingly dynamic nature of business-to-business electronic commerce has produced a recent shift away from fixed pricing and toward flexible pricing. Flexible pricing, as defined here, includes both differential pricing, in which different buyers may receive different prices based on expected valuations, and dynamic-pricing mechanisms, such as auctions, where prices and conditions are based on bids by market participants. In this paper we survey ongoing work in flexible pricing in the context of the supply chain, including revenue management, procurement, and supply-chain coordination. We review negotiation mechanisms for procurement, including optimization approaches to the evaluation of complex, multidimensional bids. We also discuss several applications of flexible pricing on the sell side, including pricing strategies for response to requests for quotes, dynamic pricing in a reverse logistics application, and pricing in the emerging area of hosted applications services. We conclude with a discu ssion of future research directions in this rapidly growing area. View full abstract»

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  • Instance-level access control for business-to-business electronic commerce

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 303 - 317
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (9)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (578 KB)  

    The emergence of e-marketplace Web sites that contain proprietary information from multiple organizations requires the creation of new access control schemes that provide fine-grained access control while reducing both administrative and run-time overhead. It is also desirable to have clear, concise, and easily configurable definitions of access control policies that are aligned with business processes, and to have these policies enforced consistently throughout an e-commerce system. In this paper, we describe a policy-based access control scheme, and its implementation, that allows access to individual instances of resources to be specified in a concise and computationally efficient manner. We model business relationships between users and business objects and use implicit grouping of users and resources. These concepts allow policies to refer efficiently to aggregates of resources and users and to document the intention of an authorization policy. Our access control scheme is implemented as an applicati on-level access control mechanism within IBM's WebSphere® Commerce Suite, Marketplace Edition. We use this implementation to provide examples and give performance data. For future work, we discuss how our policy-based, resource-level access control scheme might be enhanced to augment language-level access control schemes, such as the Java™ 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE™) security model. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Throughout its history, the IBM Systems Journal has been devoted to software, software systems, and services, focusing on concepts, architectures, and the uses of software.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
John J. Ritsko
IBM T. J. Watson Research Center5