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IBM Systems Journal

Issue 4 • Date 2007

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • Message from the Senior Vice President, Enterprise On Demand Transformation & Information Technology

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Changing the corporate IT development model: Tapping the power of grassroots computing

    Page(s): 1 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1815 KB)  

    The recent rise of grassroots computing among both professional programmers and knowledge workers highlights an alternative approach to software development in the enterprise: Situational applications are created rapidly by teams or individuals who best understand the business need, but without the overhead and formality of traditional information technology (IT) methods. Corporate IT will be increasingly challenged to facilitate the development, integration, and management of both situational and enterprise applications. In this paper, we describe the emerging prevalence of situational application development and the changing role of IT. We also describe the experience at IBM in building, deploying, and managing the IBM Situational Applications Environment that enables employees to take responsibility for some of their own solutions. Finally, we discuss ways in which the situational application development paradigm may evolve in coming years to benefit enterprises, the demands that it will put on IT departments, and possible ways to address these challenges. View full abstract»

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  • Preface

    Page(s): 627 - 628
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    Advances in information technology (IT), coupled with the increased competition brought about by globalization, are strongly affecting the business environment. To succeed in this new environment, businesses are transforming themselves and becoming more agile and more efficient. The IBM strategy for its on demand transformation is enabled by IT and involves creating new approaches to solving its business challenges, making better use of the talent and experience of its workforce through improved collaboration, and enhancing productivity by improving its business processes. View full abstract»

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  • A model for CIO-led innovation

    Page(s): 629 - 637
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (468 KB)  

    The CIO (chief information officer) organization at IBM has adopted the idea of a participatory Web and is engaged in leveraging employee talent to address the persistent information technology challenges facing global enterprises. A series of unique open conversations among employees resulted in a new approach to collaborative innovation. This new model of innovation has become an important component of the IBM product and service strategy, as it has generated new solutions that have met quick market success. In this paper we describe this model of innovation and illustrate our experience in four case studies. View full abstract»

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  • Engaging a corporate community to manage technology and embrace innovation

    Page(s): 639 - 650
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    It has been estimated that approximately 50 percent of technology implementation failures are due to scheduling and budget issues and 27 percent are due to customer dissatisfaction. If typical technology solutions face these odds, how can riskier emerging technology and innovation activities succeed? This paper describes the IBM Technology Adoption Program (TAP), an effort by its technology and innovation team to formalize its innovation management discipline. Instead of using structured governing processes, the program uses an organic approach for accelerating change. TAP is focused on cultivating and harnessing the existing early adopter and innovator communities within the enterprise to shorten the technical development cycle and deliver solutions that engage a variety of users, ensuring rapid, widespread accommodation. We describe TAP in the context of the challenges enterprises face in fostering and measuring innovation, focusing on three key areas: rallying the community, encouraging the technical investment supporting the community, and gauging the priority and value of new technology. We present several examples to illustrate the benefits that materialize from overcoming obstacles and delivering significant innovation. View full abstract»

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  • IBM business transformation enabled by service-oriented architecture

    Page(s): 651 - 667
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    This paper discusses the use of service-oriented architecture (SOA) as one of the key elements supporting business transformation at IBM. It describes the internal SOA strategy, SOA governance, organizational impacts, and several IBM internal SOA case studies. The top-down and bottom-up approaches to promoting SOA within the enterprise are also illustrated, along with a set of SOA business and information technology lessons learned. View full abstract»

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  • The internal information transformation of IBM

    Page(s): 669 - 683
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    The ability to utilize data as an enterprise asset is central to every enterprise transformation initiative. This ability is critical for reusing data consistently throughout the enterprise and deriving actionable knowledge from it. Accurate and high-quality data must consistently propagate meaning and value throughout the enterprise and comply with the policies and processes of the enterprise. For a variety of reasons, large enterprises manage data at a local level (e.g., for each department and location), resulting in information “silos” where data is redundantly stored, managed, and processed, each with its own policies and processes, leading to inconsistency. IBM has begun a transformation process to establish a program for the management of its critical data, beginning with the creation of an enterprise data strategy that is aligned with IBM business strategy. In this paper, we describe the progress, to date, of the IBM transformation process. We focus on the activities of the IBM Enterprise Business Information Center of Excellence (EBI CoE), which is responsible for establishing, implementing, and deploying the enterprise data architecture program. The EBI CoE uses leading-edge information management technology and services from IBM and its partners to address enterprise data challenges. We present lessons learned and best practices derived from this ongoing internal transformation process that can be useful for enterprises facing similar data challenges as they transform their operations and business models. View full abstract»

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  • Sense-and-respond supply chain using model-driven techniques

    Page(s): 685 - 702
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1255 KB)  

    The results of an effort to build a sense-and-respond solution for a supply chain by using a model-driven development framework are described in this paper. One of the components of the framework is the IBM Research-developed model-driven business-transformation (MDBT) toolkit, a set of formal models, methods, and tools. The inventory optimization analytics used to improve supply chain performance are also described. This approach is illustrated through a case study involving the IBM System x™ supply chain. View full abstract»

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  • Artifact-centered operational modeling: Lessons from customer engagements

    Page(s): 703 - 721
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    For almost a decade, the artifact-centered operational-modeling approach for modeling business operations, also referred to as the “business artifact method,” has been practiced and refined. This approach has been used in a variety of engagements, and each engagement has brought forth innovations that have enriched and strengthened the approach. In this paper, we describe three of these engagements in order to illustrate the method and highlight some of the lessons learned. The main objective of this paper is to establish the value of operational modeling in business transformation and to incorporate the lessons we have learned into a more comprehensive account of the method. We also describe the model-driven business transformation toolkit, which adds a unique value proposition to the method—the rapid and effective transformation of operational models into implementations that are manageable and can be monitored. View full abstract»

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  • Core business architecture for a service-oriented enterprise

    Page(s): 723 - 742
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    The business architecture of a service-oriented enterprise can be adequately represented through five main architectural domains: business value, structure, behavior, policy, and performance. In this paper we focus on the core business architecture, the set of essential elements in each of the five domains, and the interrelationships among these elements. The business architecture described in this paper identifies the key elements required for business reasoning and for its application to business transformation through service-oriented solutions. A business scenario involving a fictional company in the apparel business illustrates the concepts presented here. View full abstract»

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  • Voice-enabled IT transformation: The new voice technologies

    Page(s): 763 - 775
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    Voice technologies can enrich the ways in which people communicate and enable novel modes of collaboration, such as integrated voice- and text-based communication services, social and business networking facilities, and the evolving Internet technologies (collectively known as the Web 2.0 technologies). These new technologies can alleviate many problems in interpersonal communications, including those affecting person-to-person, online meeting, contact center, and business-process scenarios. In this paper, we identify some of the new challenges enterprise employees face and discuss the potential of voice technologies to help with these challenges. We also examine the new business environment, the communication services it demands, and the challenges enterprises face in delivering these services. View full abstract»

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  • On optimizing the selection of business transformation projects

    Page(s): 777 - 795
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    To compete and thrive in a changing business environment, a business can adapt by initiating and successfully carrying out business transformation projects. In this paper we propose a methodology for the optimal selection of such transformational projects. We propose a two-stage methodology based on (1) correlation analytics for identifying key drivers of business performance and (2) advanced portfolio-optimization techniques for selecting optimal business-transformation portfolios in the face of resource constraints, budget constraints, and a rich variety of business rules. We illustrate our methodology through a case study from the electronics industry. View full abstract»

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  • Analytics-driven solutions for customer targeting and sales-force allocation

    Page(s): 797 - 816
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    Sales professionals need to identify new sales prospects, and sales executives need to deploy the sales force against the sales accounts with the best potential for future revenue. We describe two analytics-based solutions developed within IBM to address these related issues. The Web-based tool OnTARGET provides a set of analytical models to identify new sales opportunities at existing client accounts and noncustomer companies. The models estimate the probability of purchase at the product-brand level. They use training examples drawn from historical transactions and extract explanatory features from transactional data joined with company firmographic data (e.g., revenue and number of employees). The second initiative, the Market Alignment Program, supports sales-force allocation based on field-validated analytical estimates of future revenue opportunity in each operational market segment. Revenue opportunity estimates are generated by defining the opportunity as a high percentile of a conditional distribution of the customer's spending, that is, what we could realistically hope to sell to this customer. We describe the development of both sets of analytical models, the underlying data models, and the Web sites used to deliver the overall solution. We conclude with a discussion of the business impact of both initiatives. View full abstract»

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  • Model analysis for business event processing

    Page(s): 817 - 831
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (278 KB)  

    Business event processing requires efficiently processing live events, computing business performance metrics, detecting business situations, and providing real-time visibility of key performance indicators. Given the high volume of events and significant complexity of computation, system performance—event throughput—is critical. In this paper, we advocate model-analysis techniques to improve event throughput. In the build time, a series of model analyses of the application logic are conducted to understand such factors as runtime data-access path, data flow, and control flow. Such analyses can be used to improve throughput three ways: at build time it can be used to facilitate the generation of customized code to optimize I/O and CPU usage; information about the control flow and data flow can be used to ensure that CPU resources are used effectively by distributing event-processing computation logic evenly over time; and at runtime, knowledge gained from the model can be used to plan multithreaded parallel event-processing execution to reduce wait states by maximizing parallelization and reducing the planning overhead. This paper presents a series of model-analysis techniques and the results of experiments that demonstrate their effectiveness. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Throughout its history, the IBM Systems Journal has been devoted to software, software systems, and services, focusing on concepts, architectures, and the uses of software.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
John J. Ritsko
IBM T. J. Watson Research Center5