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Internet Computing, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan.-Feb. 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 21 of 21
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • Digital Editions [advertisement]

    Page(s): c2
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  • Call for Papers

    Page(s): 1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • It's All About the (Social) Network

    Page(s): 4 - 6
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  • New Internet Economics Might Not Make It to the Edge [News & Trends]

    Page(s): 7 - 9
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  • Internet predictions [Guest editor's introduction]

    Page(s): 10 - 11
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  • Participatory sensing: applications and architecture [Internet Predictions]

    Page(s): 12 - 42
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  • IEEE Computer Society Career Center [advertisement]

    Page(s): 43
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  • Smart objects as building blocks for the Internet of things

    Page(s): 44 - 51
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    The combination of the Internet and emerging technologies such as nearfield communications, real-time localization, and embedded sensors lets us transform everyday objects into smart objects that can understand and react to their environment. Such objects are building blocks for the Internet of Things and enable novel computing applications. As a step toward design and architectural principles for smart objects, the authors introduce a hierarchy of architectures with increasing levels of real-world awareness and interactivity. In particular, they describe activity-, policy-, and process-aware smart objects and demonstrate how the respective architectural abstractions support increasingly complex application. View full abstract»

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  • Semantic mediation for standard-based B2B interoperability

    Page(s): 52 - 63
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    A semantic-mediation architecture advances traditional approaches for standard-based business-to-business interoperability. The architecture formally models a business domain in a reference ontology and annotates domain message schemas to define public and proprietary reconciliation rule sets. Enterprises can use the rule sets to implement standard-based message interfaces and to translate message content between their proprietary message forms. An implementation of the semantic-mediation architecture augments a general applications-integration toolset developed for the Athena European FP 6 project. The implementation demonstrates the architecture's feasibility and suggests directions for future tool enhancements. View full abstract»

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  • Metrics for mitigating cybersecurity threats to networks

    Page(s): 64 - 71
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    To achieve their full potential, networks must be secure as well as functional. With this in mind, the author identifies metrics designed to mitigate vulnerabilities to cyberattacks in networks that are key to the critical infrastructure of the US. He discusses both growth metrics - based on data obtained from the US National Institute of Standards and Technology and Department of Homeland Security vulnerability database - and metrics designed to mitigate the risk of security vulnerabilities in networks. If used together, these two types of metrics can help make networks more secure. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE CS Press [advertisement]

    Page(s): 72
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  • VWRAP for virtual worlds interoperability [Standards]

    Page(s): 73 - 77
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    The IETF has chartered a Virtual World Region Agent Protocol Working Group (VWRAP WG). This article briefly describes the history of virtual worlds, the architecture, protocols, and operation of Second Life (a currently prominent virtual world), and the emergence of standards efforts within the virtual world space. The authors detail the current efforts and timeline of the VWRAP WG. View full abstract»

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  • Composition as a service [Web-Scale Workflow]

    Page(s): 78 - 82
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    Understanding reusable software and assets within and among multiple organizations' system infrastructures can be challenging. IT systems might be widely distributed, and interconnections can be complicated. Ever-evolving computing technologies reduce an organization's in-house expertise for reusing software, even when leveraging software systems within its own firewalls. As such, the on-demand integration of software and capabilities might benefit from an outsourcing paradigm - described here as composition as a service. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Internet Computing EIC Search House Advertisement

    Page(s): 83
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  • Why didn't we spot that? [Practical Security]

    Page(s): 84 - 87
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    The Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol and its standards-track successor, the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol, were developed more than a decade ago and have generally withstood scrutiny in that the protocols themselves haven't been found to have security flaws. Marsh Ray and Steve Dispensa discovered a design flaw in the TLS protocol that affects all versions of the protocol up to and including the current version.Whereas the vulnerability itself is serious, it need not affect many deployments once administrators apply suitable patches to disable renegotiation, leaving TLS sufficiently secure in most cases because exploiting the vulnerability requires the attacker to be an active man-in-themiddle, redirecting traffic between victims (for example, a browser and a Web server). However, because security problems only ever get worse, a change to the protocol is required. The vulnerability is an interesting attack in itself, but perhaps more interesting is the question, why didn't we see this earlier? In this article, the author explore this question but, unfortunately, can't answer it. Hopefully, simply asking the question might prompt developers to re-examine assumptions they've forgotten they've even made. View full abstract»

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  • Computing for human experience: Semantics-empowered sensors, services, and social computing on the ubiquitous Web

    Page(s): 88 - 91
    Multimedia
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    People are on the verge of an era in which the human experience can be enriched in ways they couldn't have imagined two decades ago. Rather than depending on a single technology, people progressed with several whose semantics-empowered convergence and integration will enable us to capture, understand, and reapply human knowledge and intellect. Such capabilities will consequently elevate our technological ability to deal with the abstractions, concepts, and actions that characterize human experiences. This will herald computing for human experience (CHE). The CHE vision is built on a suite of technologies that serves, assists, and cooperates with humans to nondestructively and unobtrusively complement and enrich normal activities, with minimal explicit concern or effort on the humans' part. CHE will anticipate when to gather and apply relevant knowledge and intelligence. It will enable human experiences that are intertwined with the physical, conceptual, and experiential worlds (emotions, sentiments, and so on), rather than immerse humans in cyber worlds for a specific task. Instead of focusing on humans interacting with a technology or system, CHE will feature technology-rich human surroundings that often initiate interactions. Interaction will be more sophisticated and seamless compared to today's precursors such as automotive accident-avoidance systems. Many components of and ideas associated with the CHE vision have been around for a while. Here, the author discuss some of the most important tipping points that he believe will make CHE a reality within a decade. View full abstract»

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  • Plenty of room outside the firm [Peering]

    Page(s): 92 - 96
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    There are many ways to think about the future of computing, but to do so successfully requires looking at previous experience and predictions. The author's focus here is on computing rather than computers, though the increasing power of the latter facilitates the former. For example, the author have nothing to say about the future of multicore or parallel computing, except that beyond the Internet, the predictions for this technology have been rather optimistic for the past 30 years. This paper is all about how the author argue for the topics of future not often addressed. Some of these topics are: the authors envisioned computing application; the fall of the computing politburo; emergent collectives; everyone is a service; coordinating services; and the plenty of room for research. View full abstract»

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  • Editorial Calendar

    Page(s): c3
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  • Computer Society Student Membership

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Internet Computing provides journal-quality evaluation and review of emerging and maturing Internet technologies and applications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Michael Rabinovich
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Case Western Reserve University