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Industry Applications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date January-February 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 21 of 21
  • IEEE Industry Applications Magazine - Front cover

    Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • Inferences [From the Editor's Desk]

    Page(s): 2
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  • IAS---A volunteer organization [President's Message]

    Page(s): 4
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  • Safety's stories [Electrical Safety]

    Page(s): 6
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  • From power to applications---A two-year journey

    Page(s): 7 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1364 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Perhaps few people know the origin of the IEEE Industry Applications Society (IAS) Electric Machines Committee (EMC). EMC is one of the most active committees in the IAS. It sponsored 44 technical papers at the 2008 IAS Annual Meeting, and, as of September 2009, it had received 140 manuscript submissions to the IAS ScholarOne Manuscripts site, making it the most prolific technical committee in IAS. Many of these papers originated at cosponsored technical conferences held by non-IEEE organizations outside North America. Figure 1 depicts the global reach of EMC as measured in the list of countries from which papers have been received for review within the past year. Typically, each year, one or two papers are awarded prizes for their originality, technical content, and expertise. View full abstract»

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  • Revising IEEE Standard C37.2

    Page(s): 10 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (724 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article describes the experiences in revising and updating a key IEEE Standard C37.2 - Standard for Electrical Power System Device Function Numbers, Acronyms, and Contact Designations. The article cites the historical evolution of this standard dating back to 1928. The wide utilization of modern, multifunction relays and many new functions made clear the need to update the 1996 version of this standard. In addition the interweaving of communication facilities into protection and control requirements had to be addressed from function and designation points of view. The article demonstrates the importance of the involvement of the members of the IEEE in standards and the need for continued input from these members to ensure relevance to present application needs, coherence, and compatibility with other industry standards and practices. View full abstract»

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  • New marine harmonic standards

    Page(s): 16 - 25
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5944 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To address concerns associated with electrical power system harmonic distortion on ships and offshore oil rigs and platforms, marine regulating bodies have introduced strict new harmonic standards. These standards define the acceptable level of harmonic voltage distortion allowed on the vessels they certify. High-harmonic distortion levels are appearing as a result of the increased use of power-electronic drive converters for electric propulsion, drilling and pumping applications, and many other uses of variable speed-drive (VSD) systems. To meet these new standards, methods to control harmonics must be adopted. This article will discuss some of these methods and present an application where a unique wide-spectrum passive harmonic filter was used to meet harmonic limits on a cable-laying ship that previously required the use of rented generators to allow operation of VSDs. View full abstract»

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  • The best concepts from the NEC, CEC, and IEC

    Page(s): 26 - 33
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1567 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In Alberta, Canada, the authority having jurisdiction, or the regulator, has allowed qualified users the flexibility to adapt or combine elements from the CEC, NEC, and IEC into a single operating system to take advantage of the best in global technologies. This has resulted in a unique blended system that combines the best of the traditional North American and international approaches and provides cost savings over traditional electrical installations. This article discusses some of the elements used to develop this hybrid approach in terms of global technology equipment designs and wiring practices. View full abstract»

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  • Migration of fluids through a wiring system

    Page(s): 34 - 46
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1483 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The National Electrical Code (NEC) and the Canadian Electrical Code (CEC) contain the sealing requirements to prevent the migration of flammable fluids from traveling through wiring systems to nonhazardous locations, This article reviews the need for the intent and application of these code requirements. Case studies of incidents are discussed to demonstrate that significant hazards exist and how these are effectively mitigated by the requirements of these codes. View full abstract»

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  • Auditing is key

    Page(s): 47 - 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (473 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Auditing is a key element to ensure that an effective electrical safety program exists in your facility. It is recommended that internal audits be performed at least once each year and that external audits be performed not to exceed once every three years. Auditing provides the means to understand performance versus established standards and identify areas for continued improvement. To have an effective electrical safety program, an auditing process must be an integral element of the electrical safety program. An effective audit program helps to ensure that the electrical safety management systems are maintained and sustainable. A set of audit criteria and protocol provides the framework or basis for the audit program. Using protocols is beneficial to ensure consistency of the audits. To be truly effective, an audit program must be designed to be sustainable, both in terms of management commitment to the process and to the ongoing development of knowledgeable and capable auditors. A management process that addresses the content and scope of the audits, standards and regulations that apply to the facilities, use of audit protocols, the frequency of audits, and training of auditors is integral to an effective and sustainable auditing program. A sustainable auditing program ensures that the electrical safety procedures, recordkeeping, and operating discipline are continuously monitored and improved upon, and in the end, electrical-related incidents and injuries are reduced. View full abstract»

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  • Arc-resistant motor control equipment

    Page(s): 57 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1977 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article outlines the added benefits of arc-resistant medium-voltage (MV) motor-control equipment along with the details surrounding the appropriate installation and site-application considerations when arc- resistant MV control products are being considered. A case history is also included, where arc-resistant MV motor-control equipment was installed at a North American production facility of a large chemical company. Failure within a piece of MV control equipment, whether from a defect, an unusual service condition, lack of maintenance, or maloperation, may initiate an internal arc. Standards and guides have been developed over a period of many years through the cooperative efforts of users, those who specify equipment, manufacturers, and other interested parties to evaluate the ability of a given design to withstand fault conditions. These test conditions were traditionally representative of downstream events, referred to as bolted faults, that simulate a short-circuit condition outside the equipment under test. View full abstract»

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  • Benefits of distribution automation

    Page(s): 65 - 73
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3191 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    It is the intent of this review to demonstrate some of the benefits of distribution system automation. It should be clear through the evidence presented that United has been successful at implementing DA technologies in several ways to benefit its members. In fact, because of this success, United is proactively pursuing newer technologies for its future DA plans. In so doing, United will continue finding ways to keep reliability, availability, and overall member satisfaction at the highest level of industry standards. View full abstract»

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  • Society news [including obituaries]

    Page(s): 74 - 76
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  • IAS and ECCE: A joint effort [Conference News]

    Page(s): 78 - 79
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  • Myron Zucker and Expert Now programs [Education Department News]

    Page(s): 80
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  • Standards activities for 2010 [Standards]

    Page(s): 82 - 83
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  • 2010 IEEE IAS Industrial Power Conversion Systems Department Gerald Kliman Innovator Award - Call for nominations

    Page(s): 83
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  • CMD Workshops and New Student Branches [Chapter News]

    Page(s): 84 - 84, 86
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  • IAS Conferences [Conference Calendar]

    Page(s): 86
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  • On the lighter side: Faces at Conferences

    Page(s): 88
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Industry Applications Magazine reports on the development and application of electrical systems, apparatus, devices, and controls to the processes and equipment of industry and commerce; the promotion of safe, reliable, and economic installations; the encouragement of energy conservation; and the creation of voluntary engineering standards and recommended practices.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
H. Landis "Lanny" Floyd