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Software, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 1993

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Is object technology software's industrial platform?

    Page(s): 24 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (795 KB)  

    The past, present, and future of object-oriented software technology are discussed. The current beamless modeling of object-oriented systems and language choices are renewed. Future architecture development, development processes, legacy systems, and languages are described.<> View full abstract»

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  • The essence of objects: concepts and terms

    Page(s): 31 - 42
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    Core concepts in object-oriented technology are defined. The concepts are the basis for characterizing and contrasting various object-oriented technologies. The core concepts are: all objects embody an abstraction, objects provide services, clients issue requests, objects are encapsulated, requests identify operations, requests can identify objects, new objects can be created, operations can be generic, objects can be classified in terms of their services, objects can have a common implementation, and objects can share partial implementations. To address communication problems, a glossary of terms appropriate for the diverse set of domains in which object-oriented concepts are being applied is developed. The definitions are grouped into three sections in top-down order: terms related to abstraction, terms related to requesting services, and terms related to performing services.<> View full abstract»

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  • Lessons learned in managing object-oriented development

    Page(s): 43 - 53
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    The author relates experience gained in developing tightly constrained, custom object-oriented systems, in which success depends on delivering a functional system on time and on budget, often for a fixed price. Many of the systems developed had the additional constraint of real-time requirements, and most had some kind of reuse goals. The organization, planning, and progress tracking of an object-oriented project are discussed. The management model and resources used in such a project are described.<> View full abstract»

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  • Formalizing specification modeling in OOA

    Page(s): 54 - 66
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    It is argued that object-oriented analysis is not a fully mature upstream-development method because its specification process is a complex round-trip method that has not been described in detail. The round-trip OOA model involves data and activities that are intricately dependent on each other. If an analyst tries to use OOA to model specification sequentially, backward control flows will occur. An OOA specification process is presented that is decomposed into steps, substeps, and activities, that clarifies the dataflow between each step, substep, and activity. paying close attention to the chains of data dependence to expose activities and their relations, and that defines OOA control flows, in an effort to minimize process retrogression. The specification process is applied to a definite specification example and to formalization and visualization of an OOA.<> View full abstract»

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  • Object-oriented development at Brooklyn Union Gas

    Page(s): 67 - 74
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    The application architecture, development environment, and performance of the object-oriented customer-related information system (CRIS-II) are discussed. It is shown that CRIS-II's implementation in a Smalltalk-like execution environment with object-oriented features lessened coupling between components, compared with other object systems. The system accommodates many traditional, non-object-oriented components such as a relational database manager, an online transaction manager, a batch report writer, and a user-interface dialog manager. A technical description of CRIS-II is presented. Experiences with CRIS-II relating to code reuse and system behavior are reviewed.<> View full abstract»

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  • Maintaining object-oriented software

    Page(s): 75 - 80
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    The maintenance requirements of object-oriented software, including the ability to make changes easily and an in-depth understanding of the software's structure and behavior, are discussed. The problems encountered by a maintainer trying to understand object-oriented software by reading and statically analyzing it are described. The problems caused by dynamic binding, polymorphism, and cooperating object classes in object-oriented software maintenance are reviewed.<> View full abstract»

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  • Object-oriented design of telecommunication software

    Page(s): 81 - 87
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    A real-time object-oriented method, ROOD, that is specially designed to handle the complexity inherent in telecommunication systems is discussed. ROOD comprises an extended object-oriented modeling technique, called multiview modeling and a hierarchical system model, both tailored to the special needs of large real-time systems, especially telecommunication systems. The application of ROOD to the design of radio-controller software for a cellular phone system is described.<> View full abstract»

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  • Planning and certifying software system reliability

    Page(s): 88 - 99
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    An approach to software reliability and certification is presented that is based on the use of three mathematical models: the sampling, component, and certification models. The approach helps reduce reliability analysis to a problem that can be evaluated and manipulated through a series of spreadsheets. This approach was motivated by interest in applying the cleanroom software-engineering method in environments that require extensive code reuse.<> View full abstract»

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  • Beyond intelligent machines: just do it

    Page(s): 100 - 103
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    The author argues that users want a sense of direct and immediate control over computers that differs from how they interact with people. He presents several examples of these predictable and controllable interfaces developed in the lab. The examples include tree maps and dynamic queries.<> View full abstract»

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  • Getting started on software metrics

    Page(s): 108 - 109
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    The principles on which the Software Management Metrics system is based are discussed. The system collects metrics at regular intervals and represents current estimates of the work to be done, the work accomplished, the resources used, and the status of products being generated. The lessons learned in the eight years since Software Management Metrics were first imposed on the US Air Force's software contractors are reviewed.<> View full abstract»

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Forrest Shull
Fraunhofer Center for Experimental Software Engineering