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Industrial Electronics, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 12 • Date Dec. 2009

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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): C1 - 4741
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  • IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics publication information

    Page(s): C2
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  • Guest Editorial

    Page(s): 4742 - 4743
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  • Current Trends in Remote Laboratories

    Page(s): 4744 - 4756
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Remote laboratories have been introduced during the last few decades into engineering education processes as well as integrated within e-learning frameworks offered to engineering and science students. Remote laboratories are also being used to support life-long learning and student's autonomous learning activities. In this paper, after a brief overview of state-of-the-art technologies in the development of remote laboratories and presentation of recent and interesting examples of remote laboratories in several areas related with industrial electronics education, some current trends and challenges are also identified and discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Addressing Software Impact in the Design of Remote Laboratories

    Page(s): 4757 - 4767
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    Remote Laboratories or WebLabs constitute a first-order didactic resource in engineering faculties. However, in many cases, they lack a proper software design, both in the client and server side, which degrades their quality and academic usefulness. This paper presents the main characteristics of a Remote Laboratory, analyzes the software technologies to implement the client and server sides in a WebLab, and correlates these technologies with the characteristics to facilitate the selection of a technology to implement a WebLab. The results obtained suggest the adoption of a Service Oriented Laboratory Architecture-based approach for the design of future Remote Laboratories so that client-agnostic Remote Laboratories and Remote Laboratory composition are enabled. The experience with the real Remote Laboratory, WebLab-Deusto, is also presented. View full abstract»

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  • A Service-Oriented Educational Laboratory for Electronics

    Page(s): 4768 - 4775
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (761 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes a service-oriented middleware to access heterogeneous remote laboratory equipment and experimental settings through the network. The Web service paradigm is used to expose the functionality of the instruments and to compose measurement workflows in a multilevel architecture that enables high flexibility, scalability, and interoperability. The proposed architecture has been applied to the development of a remote laboratory for education on electronics, but the middleware can address a broad range of instrumentation and experimental activities in different fields via the same architectural design. View full abstract»

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  • Integrating Mixed-Reality Remote Experiments Into Virtual Learning Environments Using Interchangeable Components

    Page(s): 4776 - 4783
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (327 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a proposal to integrate mixed-reality remote experiments into virtual learning environments (VLEs) using the concept of interchangeable components, which can represent either real or virtual devices or software in industrial automation systems. Combinations of real and virtual technical plants and automation systems are used in different learning scenarios for teaching control and automation concepts. Configurations of interchangeable components can be dynamically created via a VLE by configuring database parameters. The proposed system includes a remote Web interface that follows a thin client strategy and is designed to be compatible with Web browsers, including basic Java support. As the architecture that supports the integration of virtual and real components is located on the server side, remote students/users are only concerned with the experiment and do not need to be aware of the system that provides this integration and flexibility. In the current version, interchangeable components are integrated via an Object Linking and Embedding for Process Control interface, which is a widely adopted standard in the control and automation area. The proposed approach also provides practical and theoretical support for experiments within a collaborative virtual environment. This paper includes a description of four experiments developed using the proposed environment and concepts. View full abstract»

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  • Performance Analysis of MicroNet: A Higher Layer Protocol for Multiuser Remote Laboratory

    Page(s): 4784 - 4790
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (392 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper analyzes the modeling and the validation of multiuser remote microcontroller laboratory-MicroLab. The MicroLab allows geographically dispersed students to conduct individual laboratory experiments remotely and simultaneously from anywhere. The distributed architecture of the laboratory behind the host computer is created by MicroNet, which is a designed higher layer controller-area-network protocol between laboratory experiments and the host computer. This paper particularly focuses on the question of whether the MicroNet meets the requirements of controlling and monitoring of laboratory experiments for multiple clients. In order to determine the validation of the MicroNet protocol, remote laboratory is modeled and simulated under various message traffics. In addition, the achievable highest amounts of laboratory experiments are investigated. Overall, the results showed that the microcontroller experiments can be remotely programmed and conducted. Furthermore, the results also demonstrate that, if needed, more laboratory experiments can be added to remote laboratories. View full abstract»

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  • Ciclope Robot: Web-Based System to Remote Program an Embedded Real-Time System

    Page(s): 4791 - 4797
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    This paper presents a particular case of a pedagogically successful, dynamic, and efficient remote laboratory. The aim of the remote laboratory is to learn how to program embedded real-time systems in a real machine such as a robot. The system supplies feedback information to the user through a Web browser and an ssh terminal. Likewise, the remote laboratory allows a high degree of interaction owing to a clear and simple interface. This type of telecontrol Web-based system generates strong interest among students. The following are the two main contributions of this system: The remote laboratory allows collaboration among students in order to solve the problem, and the usage of a free software architecture allows anyone to replicate and improve the laboratory. View full abstract»

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  • Remote Experiments With Mobile-Robot Hardware via Internet at Limited Link Capacity

    Page(s): 4798 - 4805
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (559 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Mobile robots provide a motivating basis for hardware experiments in kinematics, dynamics, and control topics. A suitable infrastructure is to be established in order to offer a worldwide user community of students' access to the mobile robots via Internet. Functionalities in the area safety, user-management, hardware interfaces, and constraints related to the available link quality must be taken into account. In this paper, in particular, aspects related to efficient teleoperation of mobile robots despite communication-link constraints are analyzed. Details of the technical implementation of the system architecture are described as well as characteristic performance measurements. View full abstract»

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  • Remote Programming of Network Robots Within the UJI Industrial Robotics Telelaboratory: FPGA Vision and SNRP Network Protocol

    Page(s): 4806 - 4816
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1600 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the UJI Industrial Robotics Telelaboratory, which lets Ph.D. and Master's degree students perform robotics and computer vision tele-experiments. By using this system, students are able to program experiments remotely via the Web, in order to combine the use of a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) to provide real-time vision processing, a conveyor belt, and a Motoman industrial manipulator. This paper introduces the novel SNRP protocol (i.e., Simple Network Robot Protocol), which permits the integration of network robots and sensors within an e-learning platform in a simple and reliable manner. As long as the students are able to interact remotely with a real robotic scenario, this system helps students very much to learn robotics control techniques like visual servoing control, vision for industrial applications, and robotics manipulation. The various components of the system are connected via a 100BaseT Ethernet network and follow the SNRP protocol, which grants simple access to generic networked devices using enhanced HTTP-based connections. Moreover, the whole telelaboratory is connected to the Internet through a router that permits the user to control the networked devices according to security constraints. The SNRP architecture is compared with a Common Object Request Broker Architecture-based approach, which was used in a previous telelaboratory. This paper describes two principle contributions: the design of a novel SNRP network architecture for the intercommunication of robots and sensors within an e-learning telelaboratory and the integration of a programmable FPGA vision system, which allows students to learn not only robotic techniques but also the design of high-performance circuits for industrial vision applications. View full abstract»

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  • From Remote Experiments to Web-Based Learning Objects: An Advanced Telelaboratory for Robotics and Control Systems

    Page(s): 4817 - 4825
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (798 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the current evolution of the telelaboratory facilities at the University of Pisa. In particular, starting from a standard environment providing remote access to a set of experiments, the telelaboratory is now organized as a collection of learning objects, i.e., modular didactic units designed following specific learning objectives within control systems and robotic fields. The telelaboratory has a remote Web-based access which can be used both as a simulation environment and as a remote way of performing real physical experiments. The developed telelaboratory is based on free open-source software such as Scilab/Scicos, Comedi, and real-time application interface patch for Linux kernels. In-house software tools, such as a Java Web hyper modular interface system, graphic environment tools, and a virtual laboratory interface based on Java applets, have been developed as a support for the learning process. View full abstract»

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  • Energetic Macroscopic Representation and Inversion-Based Control Illustrated on a Wind-Energy-Conversion System Using Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation

    Page(s): 4826 - 4835
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    Study of a wind-energy-conversion system (WECS) is a very attractive topic for students. The analysis of an entire WECS requires knowledge of different scientific fields, which are of interest for future engineers. In this paper, energetic macroscopic representation is used to describe a complete WECS. This synthetic graphical tool yields a natural decomposition of the studied WECS with respect to physical laws. Moreover, a control scheme is easily deduced from this description using inversion-based rules. Thus, maximum-power point-tracking strategies and drive controls can be defined. The simulation of the studied WECS is directly transposed to Matlab-Simulink. Moreover, a hardware-in-the-loop simulation of the WECS is studied using an actual induction generator and an electrical drive to simulate the wind turbine. This graphical methodology is used in the electrical engineering Masters degree at the University of Lille (France). View full abstract»

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  • A Remote Laboratory in Engineering Measurement

    Page(s): 4836 - 4843
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (954 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Online engineering practice is offering nowadays new potentials for training of measurement technologies and experimental procedures. In a laboratory mainly devoted to instrumentation for measurement by hands-on activity in engineering fields, students and engineering professionals are using, at present, online experiments in a blended-learning approach. A set of experiments has been designed and developed as well as some virtual simulators. The experiments integrated in a Moodle platform are using a Web-server system based on LabVIEW 7.1, linked to them by data acquisition interface cards, a video server, and a booking system developed as an extension of the Moodle platform. This paper reports a particular setup specially designed for remotely measuring and determining mechanical material properties and its combination with the design of a highly interactive user interface. The user may remotely conduct the experiment, getting numerical, graphical, and live video output information and receiving e-mailed experimental results. View full abstract»

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  • ENEL PILOT: From a Research Testbed to a Virtual Educational Laboratory

    Page(s): 4844 - 4853
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1146 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Education in the field of distributed process control and intelligent actuation and measurement (IAM) systems can be greatly enhanced through the use of tools that simulate the behavior of real systems, thus allowing students to test and compare different configurations. In this paper, we present an educational virtual laboratory, called the IAM-Pilot Virtual Laboratory (IPVL), which simulates a physical process consisting of a closed circuit of treated water implementing four regulation loops for pressure, level, flow, and temperature, respectively. This tool is the virtual implementation of a real research laboratory (IAM-Pilot), which was developed a few years ago in the framework of several projects funded by the European Commission, in order to test concepts regarding distributed systems, technologies, and components. The tool allows students to set several different system configurations, both in the control and communication parts, and then assess the resulting behavior. They can also install on the plant different virtual devices, with different features, and monitor their effect on the system. The tool produces graphs that allow students to evaluate the performance offered by the control system. This paper describes the architecture and implementation of the IPVL and reports on its usage in the context of the distributed process control network course at the Faculty of Engineering, University of Catania. View full abstract»

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  • A Flexible Converter With Two Selectable Topologies

    Page(s): 4854 - 4861
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (786 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In order to satisfy the requirement of wide adaptability for standard power modules in the scheme of power electronics system integration, a novel conception of flexible converter is proposed. Next, a practical case of flexible converter with two selectable topologies based on LLC resonant converter with frequency modulation is also proposed. This converter can operate under two various topologies to satisfy various applications only by altering the connecting mode of the output pins. This converter is suitable for two applications of V/I output and 2V/(I/2) output and the voltage stresses and current stresses of all main components are peer to peer under these two applications. The design considerations of small-signal, electromagnetic compatibility, and layout for the flexible converter are also discussed. A prototype with selectable output of 110 V/10 A and 220 V/5 A is built to verify the aforementioned analysis and the highest efficiency is above 96%. View full abstract»

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  • Design and Implementation of RGB LED Drivers for LCD Backlight Modules

    Page(s): 4862 - 4871
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1321 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, a backlight module driver driving high-power red, green, and blue light-emitting diodes (RGB LEDs) for a 19-in liquid crystal display is proposed. The DC-DC series resonant converters (SRCs) with zero-voltage switching and constant-output-current control are implemented to drive the RGB LED arrays. Phase-shifted pulsewidth modulation dimming control is adopted to effectively narrow the load variations and improve the output voltage regulations of the SRCs. A DSP-based hysteresis control algorithm is performed to track the white-color point and the specified backlight luminance. Analysis and design considerations of the proposed drivers are presented in detail. Experimental results agree well with the theoretical predictions and confirm the validity of the proposed approach. View full abstract»

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  • Design of an Analog Quasi-Steady-State Nonlinear Current-Mode Controller for Single-Phase Active Power Filter

    Page(s): 4872 - 4881
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (393 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The injection of sinusoidal current to an electrical grid is nowadays possible with the use of active power filters (APFs). With quasi-steady-state (QSS) nonlinear controllers, these power filters provide low grid-current-harmonic content with simple-control analog implementation. This paper focuses on the design of a QSS nonlinear controller for a single-phase APF. A complete analysis based on the sliding-mode-control theory is given. From the analysis, a set of control-design guidelines is presented to select the gains and parameters of the control scheme. Selected experimental results are reported to validate the theoretical design procedure. View full abstract»

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  • An Improved AC–DC Single-Stage Full-Bridge Converter With Reduced DC Bus Voltage

    Page(s): 4882 - 4893
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    A new ac-dc single-stage voltage-fed pulsewidth-modulation (PWM) full-bridge converter is proposed in this paper. The converter can simultaneously perform input power factor correction and dc-dc conversion using conventional phase-shift PWM and can maintain a primary-side dc bus voltage of less than 450 V even at a high input line voltage of 265 Vrms. This is a combination of features that few, if any, other converters of the same type have. The proposed converter has these features due to the novel implementation of an asymmetrical auxiliary transformer winding that is placed in series with the input inductor and acts as a boost switch. In this paper, the operation of the proposed converter is explained in detail, its outstanding features are discussed, and a detailed design procedure is given and demonstrated with an example. Experimental results that confirm the feasibility of the converter and its ability to meet IEC1000-3-2 Class D standards for electrical equipment are also presented in this paper. View full abstract»

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  • Z-Source-Converter-Based Energy-Recycling Zero-Voltage Electronic Loads

    Page(s): 4894 - 4902
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (713 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes two high-efficiency energy-recycling zero-voltage electronic loads (ELs) based on a Z-source converter. ELs are a family of power converters which are used as variable impedance loads in several applications. Such applications include testing of photovoltaic (PV) cells, power converters, and power supplies or frequency control of stand-alone microgeneration. In PV-cell performance tests, the zero-voltage operation, near the short-circuit point of the PV cell's I- V curve, creates a challenge for EL design. The converter that is suitable for this application must have the ideal current source behavior because the challenge is to draw a specific constant current from the source under test even during the zero-voltage condition. The energy recycling principle increases the efficiency and allows the construction of high-power ELs. The proposed topologies are based on the Z-source converter and achieve the ideal current source behavior of draining an adjustable current even when the source voltage is zero. These topologies also provide power recycling for energy saving and for developing high-power ELs. The first configuration is based on the traditional Z-source converter, and the second one is based on the recently proposed quasi Z-source converter. Two prototypes were analyzed and built. Experimental results are provided to verify the principle of operation. View full abstract»

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  • Modeling of a PEM Fuel-Cell Stack for Dynamic and Steady-State Operation Using ANN-Based Submodels

    Page(s): 4903 - 4914
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1171 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A simple and accurate fuel-cell model is required for fuel-cell-based power-electronic applications. An artificial neural network (ANN) model is developed in this paper to model some nonlinear structures within the hybrid model of a proton-exchange-membrane fuel-cell stack. It improves accuracy and allows the model to adapt itself to operating conditions. Moreover, the temperature effect on the fuel-cell stack is represented as the current effect by using ANN to help estimate the relationship between current and temperature. The real-time implementation of the proposed ANN model is realized via a dSPACE system. Experimental results are provided to verify the validity of the proposed model. View full abstract»

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  • Efficient FPGA Realization of CORDIC With Application to Robotic Exploration

    Page(s): 4915 - 4929
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    We present an area efficient method and field programmable gate array (FPGA) realization for two common operations in robotics, namely, the following: (1) rotating a vector in 2D and (2) aligning a vector in the plane with a specific axis. It is based on a new coordinate rotation digital computer (CORDIC) algorithm that is designed to work with a small set of elementary angles. Unlike conventional CORDIC, the proposed algorithm does not require a ROM and a full-fledged barrel shifter. The proposed CORDIC algorithm is used to design hardware efficient solutions for two mobile robotic tasks in an indoor environment without employing division and floating-point calculations. Experiments with a sole low end FPGA based robot in static as well as dynamic environments validate the power of the approach. View full abstract»

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  • A General Switch-Mode Amplifier Design for Actuators Using MIMO Optimal Feedback Quantization

    Page(s): 4930 - 4938
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (321 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes a novel switch-mode power stage architecture for actuators. For a large number of actuators, the associated power amplifier becomes costly and bulky when each actuator is controlled by an independent amplifier. The proposed architecture allows actuators to share power amplifiers, thereby reducing the number of switching devices. This architecture is mapped into the graph theorem, and acceptable actuation states are analyzed. The switching method is controlled by multiple-input multiple-output optimal feedback quantization, which is designed to minimize a weighted measure of quantization distortion. Simulation and experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. View full abstract»

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  • An Adaptive Address Power Saving Method Based on the Prediction of Power Consumption in an AC PDP

    Page(s): 4939 - 4948
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1026 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Address driver circuits are responsible for a significant portion of power consumption by a plasma display panel television. In the latest effort for the reduction of the power consumption by address driver circuits, the power-efficient operation mode is selected by controlling the voltage of the capacitor that affects the LC resonance. This paper presents an analysis of power consumption by the address circuits and observes that the operation mode change in a previous work is too slow to achieve an efficient power reduction when the number of data switchings of each scan line changes abruptly in the input image. This paper proposes a new power reduction method with a fast selection of the operation mode based on the analysis of the power consumption by each address operation mode. The fast mode selection enables rapid change of the address operation mode and consequently leads to a reduction of power consumption by 22.2% when compared with the previous method. View full abstract»

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  • 2009 Index IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics Vol. 56

    Page(s): 4949 - 5018
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics encompasses the applications of electronics, controls and communications, instrumentation and computational intelligence for the enhancement of industrial and manufacturing systems and processes.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Carlo Cecati
DISIM - Univ. degli Studi dell'Aquila
67100 Aquila, Italy
c.cecati@ieee.org
Phone: +39 0862 434 450
Fax: +39 0862 1960 411