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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date Nov. 2009

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Displaying Results 1 - 22 of 22
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): C1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management publication information

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): C2
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  • From the Editor

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 569 - 570
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  • Further Motivation for Continuous Improvement in Just-In-Time Logistics

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 571 - 583
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (300 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In the supply chain literature, little work has been done on modeling the propagation pattern of quality defects in supply chains. We quantitatively model a defect bullwhip effect in supply chains that can be addressed logistically by reducing time intervals between product deliveries. We explicitly consider the cause and effect of this defect bullwhip effect and demonstrate analytically that there is a strong incentive for practitioners to continuously reduce shipment size. We also consider production characteristics such as the frequency of supplier failure and stringency of the buyer's inspection process. Implications for managers are suggested. View full abstract»

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  • Managing Cultural Variation in Software Process Improvement: A Comparison of Methods for Subculture Assessment

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 584 - 599
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (588 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The scale and complexity of change in software process improvement (SPI) are considerable and managerial attention to organizational culture during SPI can therefore potentially contribute to successful outcomes. However, we know little about the impact of variations in organizational subculture on SPI initiatives. On this backdrop, we present an exploratory study of a large-scale SPI project in a Danish high-technology company, Terma. Two of its business units-integrated systems (ISY) and airborne systems (ASY)-followed similar approaches over a three-year period, but with quite different outcomes. While ISY reached capability maturity model integration (CMMI) level 2 as planned, ASY struggled to implement even modest improvements. To help explain these differences, we analyzed the underlying organizational culture within ISY and ASY using two different methods for subculture assessment. The study demonstrates how variations in culture across software organizations can have important implications for SPI outcomes. Furthermore, it provides insights into how software managers can practically assess subcultures to inform decisions about and help prepare plans for SPI initiatives. View full abstract»

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  • An Adaptive Process Model to Support Product Development Project Management

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 600 - 620
    Cited by:  Papers (21)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1557 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Projects are temporary allocations of resources commissioned to achieve a desired result. Since each project is unique, the landscape between the current state (the start of the project) and the desired state (the successful end of the project) is often dynamic, uncertain, and ambiguous. Conventional project plans define a set of related activities (a work breakdown structure and activity network) with the assumptions that this set is necessary and sufficient to reach the project's desired result. Popular models for project planning (scheduling, budgeting, etc.) and control are also based on a set of project activities that are specified and scheduled a priori. However, these assumptions often do not hold, because, as an attempt to do something novel, the actual path to a project's desired result is often revealed only by the additional light provided once the work is underway. In this paper, we model a product development process as a complex adaptive system. Rather than prespecifying which activities will be done and when, we set up: 1) a superset of general classes of activities, each with modes that vary in terms of inputs, duration, cost, and expected benefits; and 2) simple rules for activity mode combination. Thus, instead of rigidly dictating a specific project schedule a priori, we provide a ldquoprimordial souprdquo of activities and simple rules through which the activities can self-organize. Instead of attempting to prescribe an optimal process, we simulate thousands of adaptive cases and let the highest-value process emerge. Analyzing these cases leads to insights regarding the most likely paths (processes) across the project landscape, the patterns of iteration along the paths, and the paths' costs, durations, risks, and values. The model also provides a decision support capability for managers. For researchers, this way of viewing projects and the modeling framework provide a new basis for future studies of agile and adaptive processe- s. View full abstract»

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  • Freedom to Cooperate: Gaining Clarity Into Knowledge Integration in Information Systems Development Teams

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 621 - 635
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (708 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The specialized knowledge that exists among information systems development (ISD) teams must be shared and integrated to successfully develop systems solutions. Unfortunately, knowledge sharing and integration continues to be problematic. In this study, we seek out those antecedent characteristics that ISD teams should possess to facilitate the collaboration and knowledge integration necessary for enhanced performance. We propose cooperative learning theory as a lens to understand knowledge integration activities in ISD projects. We suggest that knowledge integration behaviors are discretionary, and that ISD professionals must feel autonomy in deciding to engage in them. We investigate whether the effects of autonomy on cooperative learning and of cooperative learning on work outcomes vary depending on the types of autonomy present in ISD teams. A research model is proposed, and it is empirically tested through a study of 206 ISD professionals from 38 ISD teams. Our findings suggest that autonomous teams engage more frequently in cooperative learning behaviors, and consequently perform more effectively and are more satisfied. We also find that relationships exist between the type of autonomy present in teams and the resultant elements of cooperative learning and work outcomes. View full abstract»

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  • From DSM-Based Planning to Design Process Simulation: A Review of Process Scheme Logic Verification Issues

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 636 - 649
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (638 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Planning product development processes (PDP), and particularly new product development (NPD) processes, is complex and challenging. The plan should reflect the product-related knowledge, including the influences of performing changes in one product component on the need to rework the design of other components. Given the complexity, dynamics, and uncertainties of design processes (DPs), the plan evaluation requires simulation tools. The design structure matrix (DSM) is a known method for DP planning. However, the DSM itself does not express all the relevant information required for defining process logic. Many logic interpretations are applicable in different business cases; yet, a consistent method of transforming a DSM-based plan to a logically correct concurrent process model in the case of iterative activities is lacking. A gap was identified between the literature concerning activities sequencing based on DSM and the process modeling literature concerning process verification. This survey systematically classifies the approaches used in DSM-based process planning, and discusses their strengths and limitations with problems related to process modeling logic verification of iterative processes. Demonstration of the logic differences emphasizes the need for simulation-based decision making according to the specific process attributes. View full abstract»

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  • Preemptive Learning, Competency Traps, and Information Technology Adoption: A Real Options Analysis

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 650 - 662
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (452 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Many previous real options studies suggest that increase in investment uncertainties makes deferral options more valuable. We propose a new real options model where both organizational capabilities and technological learning are emphasized. Our model demonstrates that when a company is capable of reaping sufficient benefits from preemptive learning of a new information technology, it will expedite its adoption of the technology under greater uncertainty. When exogenous gains created by technology advance are independent of technological learning, they tend to have minimal impact on the company's optimal adoption strategy. The results of our analysis also support the view that existing technology capabilities may lead to competency traps hindering a company's technological adaptation. View full abstract»

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  • An Investigation of Customization in ERP System Implementations

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 663 - 676
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This research investigates why certain enterprise resource planning (ERP) system adopters have pursued high levels of software customization during implementation despite the generally accepted best-practice heuristic of limiting customization. Qualitative data from ERP adoption projects and consultants working with ERP implementations have been collected. This study empirically identifies customization drivers and explains their relationship to customization. The results suggest that high customization may occur because of: unnecessary redevelopment of functionality that is available in the ERP system standard, resistance to change based on cultural issues and low project acceptance, insufficient weight given to the implementation team's recommendations, and the implementation team's lack of opposition to customization requests. The results of this study also explain how these problems occur and why they lead to overcustomization. View full abstract»

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  • Effects of Institutional Pressures on Information Technology Investments: An Empirical Investigation

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 677 - 691
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (381 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Information technology (IT) investments account for a significant proportion of capital budgets of most firms today. While research attention so far has been focused on if and how firms benefit from these investments, limited attention has been paid to understand what determines the IT investment levels of firms. In this study, we examine the effects of institutional pressures and firm characteristics on the IT investment levels of a firm after controlling the financial conditions of the firm. Using available data from secondary sources, we find that the IT investment intensity of a firm is positively associated with that of its competitors, suppliers, and customers. We also find that the degree of institutional shareholding is positively associated with its IT investment intensity. Our results shed light on the motives and drivers of IT investment decisions by highlighting that these decisions are influenced by both economic considerations and legitimacy considerations such as conforming to institutional norms. View full abstract»

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  • IT Capital Accumulation and Productivity Growth in Public Accounting Firms

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 692 - 700
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (294 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this study, we apply the tripartite decomposition of productivity growth proposed by Kumar and Russell (Amer. Econ. Rev., vol. 92, pp. 527–548, 2002) to estimate and evaluate the contribution of firms’ IT capital accumulation to their productivity growth. Analyzing a panel data on 52 public accounting firms in Taiwan for ten years from 1993 to 2002, our results indicate that the productivity growth of these accounting firms was primarily due to their accumulation of IT capital. In addition, our results indicate that services diversification towards nonaudit services and workforce quality contributed to accounting firms’ IT capital accumulation, which, in turn, led to their productivity growth. View full abstract»

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  • Journal subscription information

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 701
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Forthcoming Engineering Management Related Conferences

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 702 - 703
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Papers to be published in future issues

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 704 - 705
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Acknowledgment of Reviewers

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 706 - 708
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 709 - 710
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Special issue on hybrid innovation management and global corporations

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 711
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 2009 Index IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management Vol. 56

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 712 - 718
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  • IEEE copyright form

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 719 - 720
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  • IEEE Engineering Management Society Information

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): C3
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  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management information for authors

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E. 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Rajiv Sabherwal
Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas