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Nanotechnology Magazine, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date December 2009

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine - Front cover

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 1 - 2
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  • Revolutionizing information storage technology [The Editor's Desk]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 3
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  • Nonvolatile semiconductor memory revolutionizing information storage

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 4 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (985 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    (1) NVSM has revolutionized the information-storage technology and has ushered in the mobile electronics era. (2) NVSM has enabled the development of numerous new electronic applications and has penetration rates of over 90% in electronic systems since 2005; it is ubiquitous. (3) Flash memory owns many good attributes for an almost ideal memory. Therefore, it is an inevitable key component in many applications. (4) NAND-based Flash is not only for memory use but is the best solution today for semiconductor digital-mass storage among all other semiconductor choices. Many exotic/emerging technologies are under research for the next-generation candidate, but as of today, none are ready to overtake the floating-gate NVSM- the gap is still quite large. View full abstract»

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  • A new generation of scanning probe technology

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 10 - 13
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    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) analysis of materials is reliant upon direct physical interaction between a scanning probe and a sample surface. This physical interaction provides a range of analysis and surface modification techniques that are unique in microscopy and offers particular advantages and limitations. Precise computer-controlled positioning capabilities of SPM instrumentation continues to improve and is being combined with new nanoengineered probe types to achieve long-sought nanotechnology goals and minimize some of the traditional limitations of scanning probe technology. View full abstract»

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  • Scaling properties of nanotube-based macroscopic cables through multiscale numerical simulations

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 14 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1350 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles are extremely interesting for engineering applications because of their density, elastic modulus, and mechanical strength. In particular, ambitious structures such as space elevators or superbridges (i.e., kilometer-long suspended bridges) could be conceived by exploiting the unique properties provided by CNT technology.Many experimental studies exist for the evaluation of the mechanical characteristics of CNTs or CNT yarns; however, numerical studies clearly become indispensable when predictions are to be made for full-scale structures.To address these issues, we describe a numerical procedure based on a hierarchical fiber-bundle model (HFBM) approach specifically developed to carry out multiscale simulations for CNT-based cables and estimate relevant mechanical characteristics such as Young's modulus, strength or released energy during damage progression, and evaluate the scaling of these properties with cable size. View full abstract»

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  • Nanopackaging research at Georgia Tech

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 20 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    The vision of GT-PRC's 3D systems is to go beyond 3D ICs to miniaturize the entire electronic or bioelectronic system components to nanoscale, such as passive components, system interconnections, thermal structures, and power supplies. Recent advances in the synthesis of nanomaterials with outstanding properties combined with novel processing technologies can lead to highly miniaturized, highly functional, and lowcost components and systems (Table 2). The nano to microscale wiring on system packages, off-chip nanointerconnections, and functional nanocomponents for RF, digital, and biofunctions will eventually migrate systems to nanoscale. Nanopackaging, therefore, should transform the handheld devices of today to become megafunctional convergent systems with computing, communications, and sensor capabilities. View full abstract»

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  • Standards for nanotechnology: what's important

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 26 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (728 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In the September 2008 issue of IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine, I wrote an article discussing why we might not achieve a nanotechnology gold rush without the development of standards. My message was very simple: standards are needed to achieve a high degree of interoperability, create order in the marketplace, simplify production requirements, manage the potential for adverse environmental impacts, and above all, ensure for the safety and health of those of us who will be developing and using the next generation of materials and devices. Since that article was published, numerous questions were raised as to where our efforts and resources are most needed in the development of standards. The IEEE and other organizations such as the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) have worked together in the area of electronics. However, electronics is only a small piece of the pie. View full abstract»

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  • Nanopackaging--Nanotechnologies and Electronics Packaging (Morris, J.E.) [Book review]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 32 - 33
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  • IEEE-NEMS 2010 - Call for participation

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 34
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  • 2009 Index IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine Vol. 3

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 35 - 38
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  • The 5th IEEE-NEMS 2010

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 39
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