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Computer

Issue 10 • Date Oct. 2009

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 33
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): 1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • Computer Highlights Society Magazines

    Page(s): 4 - 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (11769 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
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  • Letters

    Page(s): 6 - 7
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  • The Marketplace of Ideas

    Page(s): 8 - 11
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    Like many of the accomplishments of software engineering, connecting the grid to a virtual machine is a way of hiding information, of allowing programmers to focus on the task they want to complete and ignore details beyond that task. View full abstract»

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  • 32 and 16 Years Ago

    Page(s): 12 - 13
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    Highlights new technologies being written about in Computer Magazine in 1977 and 1993. View full abstract»

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  • Intel [advertisement]

    Page(s): 14
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  • The OS Faces a Brave New World

    Page(s): 15 - 17
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    Increasingly popular approaches such as virtualization, cloud computing, and application development frameworks are changing the importance of the traditional operating system. Virtualization lets a single server host slices of multiple operating systems, each of which can run different applications within virtual machines. This makes the installation of any single full-featured OS instance a choice rather than a necessity. Cloud computing features applications that run on servers spread across the Internet. Cloud providers push these applications to users' browsers. Users of cloud based software thus don't need an OS to do more than run the browser. Developers are increasingly using frameworks that enable the faster building of applications that work with multiple OSs, again making the use of a specific operating system less important. The just enough operating system (JeOS, pronounced "juice") movement focuses on packaging an application with only the parts of an OS necessary for it to work. Over time, these developments could affect what constitutes an operating system, what its roles and responsibilities will be, and how it will be installed and used. View full abstract»

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  • News Briefs

    Page(s): 18 - 20
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  • IEEE PLIP [advertisement]

    Page(s): 21
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  • Models@ run.time

    Page(s): 22 - 27
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    Runtime adaptation mechanisms that leverage software models extend the applicability of model-driven engineering techniques to the runtime environment. Contemporary mission-critical software systems are often expected to safely adapt to changes in their execution environment. Given the critical roles these systems play, it is often inconvenient to take them offline to adapt their functionality. Consequently, these systems are required, when feasible, to adapt their behavior at runtime with little or no human intervention. A promising approach to managing complexity in runtime environments is to develop adaptation mechanisms that leverage software models, referred to as models@run. time. Work on models@run.time seeks to extend the applicability of models produced in model-driven engineering (MDE) approaches to the runtime environment. Models@run. time is a causally connected self-representation of the associated system that emphasizes the structure, behavior, or goals of the system from a problem space perspective. View full abstract»

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  • Using Model-Based Traces as Runtime Models

    Page(s): 28 - 36
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    Software engineers typically use code-level tracing to capture a running system's behavior. An alternative is to generate and analyze model-based traces, which contain rich semantic information about the system's runs at the abstraction level that its design models define. A set of metrics and operators can aid such trace analysis. View full abstract»

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  • Autonomic Computing through Reuse of Variability Models at Runtime: The Case of Smart Homes

    Page(s): 37 - 43
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    Our research shows that autonomic behavior can be achieved by leveraging variability models at runtime. In this way, the modeling effort made at design time is not only useful for producing the system but also provides a richer semantic base for autonomic behavior during execution. The use of variability models at runtime brings new opportunities for autonomic capabilities by reutilizing the efforts invested at design time. Our proposed approach has two aspects: reuse of design knowledge to achieve AC and reuse of existing model-management technologies at runtime. We developed the Model-Based Reconfiguration Engine (MoRE) to implement model-management operations. Our research demonstrates the approach's feasibility for smart homes, especially for self-healing and -configuring capabilities. View full abstract»

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  • Models@ Run.time to Support Dynamic Adaptation

    Page(s): 44 - 51
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    Today's society increasingly depends on software systems deployed in large companies, banks, airports, and so on. These systems must be available 24/7 and continuously adapt to varying environmental conditions and requirements. Such dynamically adaptive systems exhibit degrees of variability that depend on user needs and runtime fluctuations in their contexts. The paper presents an approach for specifying and executing dynamically adaptive software systems that combines model-driven and aspect-oriented techniques to help engineers tame the complexity of such systems while offering a high degree of automation and validation. View full abstract»

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  • Using Architectural Models to Manage and Visualize Runtime Adaptation

    Page(s): 52 - 60
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    The architectural runtime configuration management approach provides an accurate model of adaptive software system behavior over time. ARCM improves the visibility and understandability of runtime adaptive processes while allowing human input into the adaptation-control loop. View full abstract»

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  • Mirrors of meaning: supporting inspectable runtime models

    Page(s): 61 - 68
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    Hierarchical graphs provide a data structure to support a programming model that aims to improve understandability by creating an architectural basis for building inspectable systems.We engage developers in constructing and exposing a runtime model of a system in a clear and structured way, thereby enabling them to build inspectable systems. This approach rests on the intuition that by supporting inspection at the developers' level of detail, for their own use and benefit, the system provides a sufficient basis for differently targeted accounts. The basic runtime model we rely on can be used to create system representations tailored to serve specialized application-specific purposes.Our approach centers on a reflective data structure we call an H-graph (short for hierarchical graph) and the programming model focused around it. Equally important, the data structure supplies part of the programming model to build reflective software in general. View full abstract»

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  • [CS Info Page]

    Page(s): 69
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  • A Methodology for Analyzing Commercial Processor Performance Numbers

    Page(s): 70 - 76
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    The wealth of performance numbers provided by benchmarking corporations makes it difficult to detect trends across commercial machines. A proposed methodology, based on statistical data analysis, simplifies exploration of these machines' large datasets. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE 125 [advertisement]

    Page(s): 77
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  • A Comparison of Tools for Detecting Fake Websites

    Page(s): 78 - 86
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    As fake Website developers become more innovative, so too must the tools used to protect Internet users. A proposed system combines a support vector machine classifier and a rich feature set derived from Website text, linkage, and images to better detect fraudulent sites. View full abstract»

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  • Advertisers' Index

    Page(s): 87
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  • Career opportunities

    Page(s): 88 - 91
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  • Bookshelf

    Page(s): 92
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  • Computer Society Awards Recognize Excellence

    Page(s): 93 - 95
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  • Call and Calendar

    Page(s): 96
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Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes highly acclaimed peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Ron Vetter
University of North Carolina
Wilmington