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Radio and Electronic Engineer

Issue 6 • Date June 1983

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Displaying Results 1 - 4 of 4
  • Servants or saviours?

    Publication Year: 1983 , Page(s): 221 - 228
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (291 KB)  

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  • High-speed digital cross-correlator design for multifrequency response analysis

    Publication Year: 1983 , Page(s): 229 - 234
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (690 KB)  

    Two new cross-correlator designs are presented capable of dealing with the requirements for multifrequency response analysis. One is a modified relay correlator, the other a modified polarity coincidence correlator. View full abstract»

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  • Suppression of limit cycles in digital filters by random dither

    Publication Year: 1983 , Page(s): 235 - 240
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (936 KB)  

    The use of random dither to suppress limit cycles in 2nd-order direct-form digital filter sections is discussed. Experimental comparisons are made, for binary random dither and uniformly distributed random dither, of the average time taken to suppress limit cycles and of the increase in output noise caused by the dither. A new form of dither is introduced, termed bandstop dither. This has the advantage of suppressing limit cycles about as quickly as binary dither yet it causes an increase in output noise of less than 2 dB. View full abstract»

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  • Voice signalling in the telephone network

    Publication Year: 1983 , Page(s): 241 - 247
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1504 KB)  

    Signalling between a telephone user and the automatic network by means of dialled digits and coded tones offers little more than basic service. A wider range of services is possible by adopting the more natural medium of speech. A historical perspective illustrates developments from the speaking clock to voice guidance and improved information services. The way ahead lies in exploiting the new technologies of automatic speech generation and recognition. While these are still in their infancy there is an opportunity to ensure that they are incorporated into networks in the most satisfactory way for both administrations and customers. This will entail research into speech algorithms, hardware technologies, systems and human factors, with increasing future emphasis upon the last two. View full abstract»

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