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Radio and Electronic Engineer

Issue 5 • Date November 1964

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Selective dissemination of information

    Publication Year: 1964
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (124 KB)  

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  • Near-field measurements and the determination of aerial patterns

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 295 - 301
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (734 KB)  

    Measurements carried out in the near-field region of aerial systems can be used to predict radiation patterns. While near-field methods are unlikely to be used where conventional aerial measurements are satisfactory they become of increasing interest under those situations where normal procedures are either inadequate or impossible to apply. Near-field techniques can be broadly divided into two classes, namely those in which the radiation pattern is simulated directly within the near-field region and those in which the radiation pattern is computed directly from the near-field measurements. Several methods representative of each of these two classes are discussed (e.g. those due to Cheng, Bickmore and Jull) and the range of validity and likely applicability of each is indicated. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion on "Near-field measurements and the determination of aerial patterns"

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 301 - 303
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  • The significance of the excess charge product in drift transistors

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 304 - 312
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (969 KB)  

    The net current due to diffusion and drift in the base of a transistor is shown to be everywhere equal to that produced by drift alone due to a hypothetical distribution of potential equal at any point to the product of the densities of majority and excess minority carriers. Using this analogy, the large-signal equivalent circuit is obtained without any restriction of the geometrical shape or impurity variation in the base. View full abstract»

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  • A low-voltage glow discharge tube

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 313 - 316
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (455 KB)  

    A new low work function surface, Au-Cs-O, is described which can be used as the cathode of a glow discharge tube. Using neon as the gas filling, a maintaining potential of 30¿35 V is obtained; with helium the potential is 22¿26 V. The variation of breakdown and maintaining potentials with gas pressure and electrode separation are shown for parallel-plate discharge gaps in neon, using this cathode surface. The gas similarity laws are not obeyed. Ways in which the current-maintaining voltage characteristics differ from those for conventional discharges are also discussed. Possible applications are considered, especially the use of the Au-Cs-O surface in a trigger tube or surge diverter. View full abstract»

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  • A note on multiplicative receiving systems for radar

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 317 - 324
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (997 KB)  

    A multiplicative system is examined which consists of a 21-element array with a tapered amplitude distribution and a monopole. Radar applications are considered in the following respects: (1) The influence of the distance between the phase-centres on beam-width and side-lobe level. (2) Multiple target response for several relative strengths, phases and angular separations. The results are evaluated using an analyser for complex Fourier series and compared with similar situations in linear arrays. An estimate is given of the unwanted phenomena to be expected. Further experimental research seems to be justified and the difficulties of such experiments are outlined. View full abstract»

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  • A switch-regulated power supply system using the silicon controlled rectifier

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 325 - 330
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (518 KB)  

    Switch regulation is discussed and a full analysis of the circuit using a silicon controlled rectifier given resulting in formulae for the design of this circuit. An example is given of a complete circuit including the control amplifier for a 25 V 4 A supply unit. Performance details are included and the possible variations and applications are considered briefly. View full abstract»

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  • Phased array radar systems

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 331 - 339
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2489 KB)  

    Phased array systems provide a number of features which make them particularly suitable for long range, high target density, radar applications such as satellite tracking and space surveillance. These include long-range detection capability, high transmitted power, inertialess electronic beam steering, multiple receiving-beam capability, high reliability and extreme flexibility. Basic principles of phased array system operation are presented and a 90-element linear array feasibility model and a large scale u.h.f. planar array are described. Several potential applications of phased array systems for space surveillance are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion on ¿Phased array radar systems¿

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 339 - 340
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  • Optimum directional pattern synthesis of circular arrays

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 341 - 355
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2163 KB)  

    An attempt is made to deduce rules for designing circular arrays which produce desired directional patterns. The paper considers circular arrays consisting of equally spaced radiators distributed on the whole circumference or on a coherent part of it. First the general relation between the desired far-field amplitude distribution and the complex input amplitudes of the individual radiators is deduced. The results can be written as a linear system of equations. Its order depends only on the ratio of diameter to wavelength. This form permits a clear and simple numerical treatment of the task by means of a digital computer. Additionally, practical hints are given for the realization of the array feed function. There by it is found that a problem of the directional pattern synthesis can be reduced to a synthesis of linear networks. In a second step the actual optimizing problem is dealt with. It is intended to find, for a given ratio of circular array diameter to wavelength, the design for which the maximum array gain is obtainable with simultaneous maximum attenuation of side-lobes. The result shows that there exists a theoretical limit for the obtainable attenuation of the dominating side-lobe, a limitation which is independent of the ratio of circular array diameter to wavelength. In the investigated case this boundary is at ¿26-43 dB. The array gain increases in a nearly linear mannerwith the indicated ratio and there seems to be no theoretical limit to any desired increase of the gain. All considerations are valid for transmission and for reception. The correctness of the treatment has been confirmed by a laboratory experiment. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion on "Optimum directional pattern synthesis of circular arrays"

    Publication Year: 1964
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (98 KB)  
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