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Microwave Magazine, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Oct. 2009

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 35
  • IEEE Microwave Magazine - Front cover

    Page(s): C1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 3 - 4
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  • Why we are here [From the Editor's Desk]

    Page(s): 6
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  • Tunable and Reconfigurable Filters [From the Guest Editor's Desk]

    Page(s): 8 - 12
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  • Constant Change [President's Column]

    Page(s): 14 - 24
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  • Say Au Revoir to Cell Phones? [Microwave Surfing]

    Page(s): 26 - 26, 136
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  • Cultural Transformation [Microwave Bytes]

    Page(s): 28 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2315 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    I have from time to time talked about cultural differences in electronics in this column, usually focussing on the divide between lower frequency analog design, and microwave techniques at GHz frequencies. This leaves something of a gray area in the middle, which we loosely term RF (this stands for radio frequency, in the unlikely case any readers were unaware of this, but IEEE copy editors insist on spelling abbreviations on first usage). Being a power amplifier (PA, here we go again) specialist I have always been very conscious that PA design is one specific culture conflict that separates and distinguishes techniques in the lower RF region, known as the HF and/or VHF, from those at GHz frequencies. View full abstract»

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  • Essentials of Cognitive Radio (Doyle, L.;2009) [Book Review]

    Page(s): 42 - 44
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  • Recently Published Books

    Page(s): 44
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  • Electronically Tunable Filters

    Page(s): 46 - 54
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4101 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this article, a brief introduction to the development of tunable filters was given. A classical design technique based on a combline filter approach was shown, where minimum degradation in passband performance could be obtained across a broad-tuning range. The fundamental disadvantages associated with the conventional resonator tuning approaches were also discussed, recognizing the importance of developing new techniques for realizing tunable microwave filters. It was shown that there is a possibility in realizing an electronically reconfigurable microwave filter based on parallel- coupled switched-delay lines, which possesses the important property of maintaining constant absolute bandwidth over almost an octave of tuning bandwidth. Furthermore, the filter has the ability to incorporate active switching elements in the filter circuit, without sacrificing its loss and linearity performance. With the exceptional linearity performance and power handling capability, the filter is readily adapted to poor environments. Although the use of p-i-n diodes as switching elements would result in large dc consumption, the approach could also be readily adapted for use with any switches, such as pHEMT or RF MEMS switches, to achieve extremely low power consumption. The integration of switchable couplings to enable both bandwidth and center frequency to be reconfigurable would be an enhancement. View full abstract»

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  • Tuning in to RF MEMS

    Page(s): 55 - 72
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    RF MEMS technology was initially developed as a replacement for GaAs HEMT switches and p-i-n diodes for low-loss switching networks and X-band to mm-wave phase shifters. However, we have found that its very low loss properties (high device Q), its simple microwave circuit model and zero power consumption, its high power (voltage/current) handling capabilities, and its very low distortion properties, all make it the ideal tuning device for reconfigurable filters, antennas and impedance matching networks. In fact, reconfigurable networks are currently being funded at the same level-if not higher-than RF MEMS phase shifters, and in our opinion, are much more challenging for high-Q designs. View full abstract»

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  • Reconfigurable planar filters

    Page(s): 73 - 83
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    Electronically reconfigurable or tunable microwave filters are attracting more attention for research and development because of their increasing importance in improving the capability of current and future wireless systems. For instance, emerging ultrawideband (UWB) technology requires the use of a wide radio spectrum. However, the frequency spectrum as a resource is valuable and limited, so the spectrum is always being used for several purposes, which means it is full of unwanted signals when an operation such as a UWB wireless system is concerned. In this case, existing undesired narrowband radio signals, which vary from place to place and from time to time, may interfere with the UWB system's range. A solution for this is to introduce an electronically switchable or tunable narrow rejection band (notch) within the passband of a UWB bandpass filter. Such an electronically reconfigurable filter is also desired for wideband radar or electronic warfare systems. This paper discusses the development of electronically reconfigurable filter types. View full abstract»

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  • High-Q tunable dielectric resonator filters

    Page(s): 84 - 98
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (7746 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Tunable dielectric resonator filters can potentially address wireless and satellite applications that require very high Q values (4,000 and up) with a limited tuning range (less than 15%). Such high Q requirements cannot be met by any other known non-superconductor tunable filter technology at the present time. The intent of this paper is to provide newcomers and end users with the current status and prospective of using dielectric resonators for tunable filters. It is an enabling technology for high-Q tunable filter applications. A key challenge, however, is to increase the tuning range without degrading the Q value. While several techniques have been reported to demonstrate the feasibility of tuning dielectric resonators, the tunable dielectric resonator filter technology is still in its infancy. Very limited research effort has been dedicated to explore the potential for improving the tuning range. Most of the work reported thus far has focused on the use of TE01delta modes and standard shape resonators demonstrating a narrow tuning range. We believe that the tuning range can be increased while maintaining reasonably high Q values by exploring the use of other modes and by the use of non-standard-shape dielectric resonators. View full abstract»

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  • RF MEMS on the radar

    Page(s): 99 - 116
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2035 KB)  

    This article gives an overview of applications of radio frequency (RF) microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology in radio detection and ranging (radar). RF MEMS components for radar include attenuators, limiters, (true-time-delay) phase shifters, transmit/receive (T/R) switches and tunable matching networks. Radar subsystems that benefit from RF MEMS technology include active electronically scanned arrays (T/R modules), passive electronically scanned arrays (lenses, reflect arrays, subarrays, and switched beamformers), and radomes. Using a bottom-up approach, the figures of merit for RF MEMS technology are related to the figures of merit for radar subsystems. The article also discusses ultrawideband RF MEMS reflect array and T/R module design as examples. First, electronically scanned array, radar and RF MEMS fundamentals are briefly introduced. View full abstract»

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  • RF front-ends for software defined and cognitive radio solutions

    Page(s): 117
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  • Electronic vector-network-analyzer verification [Application Notes]

    Page(s): 118 - 123
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    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recently introduced a new electronic approach for verifying microwave vector- network-analyzer (VNA) calibrations with a single computer-controlled electronic verification artifact. The verification results are captured in easy-to-understand performance metrics that, unlike those derived from measurements of mechanical verification artifacts, are independent of the actual artifacts employed. The approach also verifies VNA calibrations more completely than was previously possible. Finally NIST's VeridiCal software automates the entire process and allows you to log results directly to NIST servers over the Internet or generate verification reports on site, greatly simplifying record keeping. View full abstract»

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  • Looking back: winning the IMS student paper competition can be a great career starter [Education news]

    Page(s): 124 - 124, 144
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  • The MTT-S India initiative year 1: a foundation is laid [Transnational news]

    Page(s): 126 - 132
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  • 2010 International Microwave Symposium

    Page(s): 133
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  • MTT-S Ombudsman

    Page(s): 134 - 136
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  • IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques

    Page(s): 137
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  • The new MGA committee: fusion, present activities, and future plans [Member committee news]

    Page(s): 138 - 138, 148
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  • Errata

    Page(s): 140
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  • IEEE COMCAS 2009

    Page(s): 141
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  • What's new in TCC land? [TCC tidbits]

    Page(s): 142 - 144
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Microwave Magazine is intended to serve primarily as a source of information of interest to professionals in the field of microwave theory and techniques.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
John Wood
Maxim Integrated Products, Inc.

San Jose, CA      USA
john.wood@ieee.org
Phone:+1 480 577 0927