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Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

Issue 5 • Date Sept.-Oct. 2009

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Displaying Results 1 - 20 of 20
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • Call for Papers

    Page(s): c2
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  • [Masthead]

    Page(s): 1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • Revisualizing Visualization

    Page(s): 4 - 5
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    This installment looks at simulation visualization's created by UC Davis researcher Kwan-Liu Ma's team. View full abstract»

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  • Creating Musical-Fountain Shows

    Page(s): 6 - 13
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    Spectators greatly appreciate majestic musical fountains such as the Bellagio music fountain in Las Vegas and the Magic Fountain of Montjuic in Barcelona. A plethora of water jets and colored lights gives these fountains a gorgeous appearance. But what further distinguishes them is that their displays are synchronized with accompanying music. Fountains that just make patterns with water jets have now developed into multimedia shows with music, light, and special effects. A musical fountain with synchronized water and music creates an atmosphere that can be exciting or romantic. The fountains in Las Vegas and Barcelona are huge, but smaller musical fountains are now appearing in many urban spaces. Whatever the fountain size, the choreography requires painstaking, expert programming, and their creators can only achieve this after careful analysis of the music. Skilled musical-fountain programmers can spend days or even weeks creating a new performance, but this is expensive. So, they rarely change the routines, and they repeat a limited program every day. For this reason, programmers usually choreograph the routines to classical music or well-known pop songs rather than very new music. View full abstract»

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  • Games, Virtual Reality, and the Pursuit of Happiness

    Page(s): 14 - 19
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    The paper discusses the aspects of games and virtual reality in human happiness.In the past few decades, scientists have focused most of their attention on developing technologies that sharpen only the minds or relieve minds and bodies of certain duties. The people become smarter but incredibly unhealthy. Health games seem to offer one solution to this problem. Entertainment based health interventions have a huge potential to transform healthcare. Most people love games.Play is a fundamental mode of expression, fulfills the human need to connect with the "other," and can even be fun. Serious play is also great exercise for the mind and spirit. The Nintendo Wii was a good start for motivating people to get off the couch. But Wii isn't good enough for virtual reality (VR) fans due to easy sensor cheats, but Wii is the first step toward liberation. For many people, the Wii is as close to VR as they've ever gotten. Health games and sensor based experiences have recently become the new, shiny promise of hope and change in our field. However, an affordable, untethered full body VR experience is still the Holy Grail. Playing Flower game was as close to VR. Liberated from complex controller buttons, the author role played a flower petal by using the controller's tilt sensor to navigate a sublime landscape.It was exhilarating, and for once, appreciated all the special realtime graphics effects that compensated for the absence of head tracking and stereoscopy, luxuries that was always expected from VR. The author concluded that health games is an exciting research area today. It's an opportunity to reuse what learned from decades of CG, VR, and digital game research, merge that with knowledge with other areas, and release new ideas into the world. View full abstract»

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  • Guest Editors' Introduction: Collaborative Visualization

    Page(s): 20 - 21
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    This article introduces a special issue on collaborative visualization. The articles in this issue present ongoing research, covering topics ranging from prototype systems to the fundamental technical challenges of creating successful collaborative systems. View full abstract»

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  • Social Mirrors as Social Signals: Transforming Audio into Graphics

    Page(s): 22 - 32
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    A social mirror is a specific type of visualization for group interaction. Three examples of social mirrors emphasize different motivations for visualizing vocal conversation: the power of visualization to influence conversation in real time, the addition of anonymous input into group visualization, and idea formation over time. Social visualizations are visualizations about people, for people. A social mirror is a type of social visualization with three particular qualities. First, it's a third-person visualization in which people can see information about themselves within information about other people. In a sense, we can perceive "us and them." Every participant sees the same visualization. Second, subtle perceivable changes of any participant appear in the visualization as they occur in near real time. This can include capturing and visualizing subtle social behaviors such as laughing and coughing. Because of this near real-time feature, people can quickly alter their behavior-and hence the visualization-so that others perceive them as they'd like to be perceived in this public mirror. Third, social mirrors allow for exploring group patterns and behavior through real-time experimentation, replay, annotation, and reconfiguration. View full abstract»

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  • Supporting Exploration Awareness in Information Visualization

    Page(s): 34 - 43
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    When users want to continue an analysis performed in the past, done by themselves or by a collaborator, they need an overview of what has been done and found so far. Such an overview helps them to gain a shared knowledge about each otherspsila analysis strategy and continue the analysis. We aim to support users in this process, and thereby support their exploration awareness. We present an information visualization framework with three linked processes: overview, search and retrieve for this purpose. First, we present a userpsilas information interest model that captures key aspects of the exploration process. Exploration overview, and keyword and similarity based search mechanisms are designed based on these key aspects. A metadata view is used to visualize the search results and help users to retrieve specific visualizations from past analysis. Finally, we present three case studies and discuss the support offered by the framework for developing exploration awareness. View full abstract»

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  • CoCoNutTrix: Collaborative Retrofitting for Information Visualization

    Page(s): 44 - 57
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    In this paper, the authors retrofitted a version of NodeTrix, a single-user graph visualization environment based on the InfoVis toolkit, to support multiple independent mice. The resulting low-cost environment was called CoCoNutTrix (Colocated Collaborative NodeTrix). Then, it was assessed how analysts viewed CoCoNutTrix and whether it effectively supported collaborative data analysis among domain experts using real data sets for social-network analysis. Our goal is to refine and expand our knowledge about retrofitting and hence designing colocated collaborative- visualization systems. View full abstract»

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  • Designing a Collaborative Visual Analytics Tool for Social and Technological Change Prediction

    Page(s): 58 - 68
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    This paper discussed about GreenOracle which an interdisciplinary team designed and developed. GreenOracle is a collaborative visual analytics tool for predicting global climate change's impact on US power grids and its implications for society and national security. These future scenarios provide critical assessments and information to help policymakers and stakeholders formulate a coherent and unified strategy toward shaping a safe and secure society. View full abstract»

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  • AstroSim: Collaborative Visualization of an Astrophysics Simulation in Second Life

    Page(s): 69 - 81
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    Developed in the Second Life 3D online multiuser environment, AstroSim (astrophysics simulation) provides synchronous collaborative visualization for astronomers. Users can play, halt, and rewind simulations and annotate stars interactively to track individual stars and gain a better understanding of stellar dynamics and astrophysics phenomena. This article is part of a special issue on collaborative visualization. View full abstract»

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  • A Low-Power Multimedia SoC with Fully Programmable 3D Graphics for Mobile Devices

    Page(s): 82 - 90
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    A low-power multimedia SoC integrates a fully programmable 3D graphics for mobile devices with an MPEG4/JPEG codec and H.264 decoder for mobile devices. A mobile unified shader achieves programmable vertex shading and pixel shading in a single die, reducing silicon area and power consumption by 35 percent and 28 percent, respectively. A logarithmic lighting engine and specialized lighting instruction improve the vertex fill rate, including transformations and lighting, to 9.1 million vertices per second. Implemented on a 6.4 mm × 6.4 mm chip with 0.13 ¿m CMOS logic, the SoC consumes less than 195 mW for 3D graphics applications at 1.2 V supply voltage and 100 MHz operating frequency and less than 152 mW for video applications. View full abstract»

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  • Virtual Reality in the Digital Olympic Museum

    Page(s): 91 - 95
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    This paper presents virtual reality in digital Olympic museum using animation and supporting cross-media information retrieval. The visitors use an avatar to navigate the DOM. DOM is a large-scale distributed 3D virtual environment for demonstrating the Olympics' history, culture and highlights. View full abstract»

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  • Using GPU Shaders for Visualization

    Page(s): 96 - 100
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    GPU shaders seem used mostly for gaming and other forms of entertainment and simulation. But they have less-obvious visualization uses, for the same reasons that interest the gaming community: improved appearance and performance. This column looks at the use of shaders and the OpenGL shading language (GLSL) in two common visualization applications: point clouds and contour cutting planes. View full abstract»

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  • Tools and Products

    Page(s): 101 - 103
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  • IEEE MultiMedia Call for Papers

    Page(s): 104
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  • Computing Now [advertisement]

    Page(s): c3
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  • Raise your standards [advertisement]

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
L. Miguel Encarnação
University of Iowa