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Nanotechnology Magazine, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 2009

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): C1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 1 - 2
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  • Nanomanipulation technology [The Editor's Desk]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 4
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  • 2010 The 5th IEEE-NEMS

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 5
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  • Image-driven cell manipulation

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 6 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1919 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) using ODEP forces were first demonstrated. It is now feasible to fabricate ODEP devices on flexible plastics. It is envisioned that the ODEP platform will become a promising tool for future biomedical applications. These newly developed ODEP devices are extremely useful for investigations at the single cell level. Several interesting examples using an ODEP platform have been reported. The first example is an optically induced microfluidic cytometer, which is capable of cell focusing, cell counting, and cell-sorting functions. The second example is a platform for continuous microparticle separation, which is useful in the preparation of samples for many biomedical protocols. The last example is an optically induced cell lysis device. This device can disrupt an individual cell within a group of cells. These three examples are briefly reviewed here. View full abstract»

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  • Nano electrostatic discharge

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 12 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (882 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As nanostructures become smaller, the electrostatic sensitivity increases, leading to new failure mechanisms. In many new electrostatically actuated devices, electric forces lead to the motion of structural elements. Electrostatically actuated devices, magnetic recording devices, photomasks, RF switches, and micromachines have air gaps, which can lead to a breakdown across surfaces and in the air gap; the failure mechanism can lead to both latent and functional failures of the structure. Significant challenges are ahead of us in providing protection to these nanostructures from electrostatics. View full abstract»

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  • Knowledge sharing and diffusion patterns

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 16 - 21
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1689 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The international interrepository knowledge sharing and diffusion patterns in nanotechnology by analyzing patent publication trends from different national or regional repositories with particular focus on the most active countries and regions are presented. The data are collected from esp@cenet worldwide database, which holds more than 60 million patent documents published by patent offices in 85 countries. In conclusion, the patent applications from the esp@cenet worldwide database shows a great increase in global nanotechnology R&D output over the past three decades. View full abstract»

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  • Carbon nanotubes in nanopackaging applications

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 22 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1497 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    CNTs are recently discovered materials made by rolled-up sheets of graphene. They may be made either by a single shell [single-walled CNT (SWCNT) with radius ranging from 0.7 to 3-4 nm] or several nested shells [multiwalled CNT (MWCNT) with outer radius typically of the order of some tens of nanometers]. The length of a nanotube may reach the order of millimeters, and hence, this nanostructured material exhibits an excellent form factor, able to comply with the ultrafine pitches required in nanopackaging. CNT (carbon nanotubes) to be used for vertical vias or interconnects for packaging applications, very high-density SWCNT bundles must be demonstrated. When using MWCNT bundles instead, the achieved density comes from a compromise between the CNT radius and its shell number. The fabrication process must provide low contact resistance, good direction control, and compatibility with CMOS technology. The road for CNTs to replace copper in chip packaging is still long, but the gap between theoretical predictions and practical applications is reducing faster and faster. View full abstract»

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  • Fundamentals of Nanotechnology (Hornyak, G.I., et al.) [Book reviews]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 26 - 27
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  • Materials for Advanced Packaging (Lu, D. and Wong, C.P.) [Book reviews]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 27 - 28
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  • Nano/microengineered molecular systems in nanotechnology

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 29 - 30
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  • IEEE NANOMED 2009

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 31
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