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Reliability, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date Oct. 1987

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 31
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Reliability Society

    Page(s): nil1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Breaker page]

    Page(s): nil1
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  • Reliability of an Electronic Assembly: A Case History

    Page(s): 385 - 389
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    This article describes the work done in evaluating the reliability of a printed-circuit-card assembly. Some assemblies went through thermal shock, humidity, and power-temperature cycling. A model was developed for interpreting a long term, high temperature life-test. Two iterations of the life test took place as part of the evaluation. A short term, intermediate temperature life-test of a relatively large number of assemblies preceded release to manufacturing. View full abstract»

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  • Comment on: Sequential Tests of Hypotheses for System-Reliability Modeled by a 2-Parameter Weibull Distribution

    Page(s): 390 - 391
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    A different point of view is presented on the content of the original paper. View full abstract»

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  • Statistical Analysis of a Compound Power-Law Model for Repairable Systems

    Page(s): 392 - 396
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    A compound (mixed) Poisson distribution is sometimes used as an alternative to the Poisson distribution for count data. Such a compound distribution, which has a negative binomial form, occurs when the population consists of Poisson distributed individuals, but with intensities which have a gamma distribution. A similar situation can occur with a repairable system when failure intensities of each system are different. A more general situation is considered where the system failures are distributed according to nonhomogeneous Poisson processes having Power Law intensity functions with gamma distributed intensity parameter. If the failures of each system in a population of repairable systems are distributed according to a Power Law process, but with different intensities, then a compound Power Law process provides a suitable model. A test, based on the ratio of the sample variance to the sample mean of count data from s-independent systems, provides a convenient way to determine if a compound model is appropriate. When a compound Power Law model is indicated, the maximum likelihood estimates of the shape parameters of the individual systems can be computed and homogeneity can be tested. If equality of the shape parameters is indicated, then it is possible to test whether the systems are homogeneous Poisson processes versus a nonhomogeneous alternative. If deterioration within systems is suspected, then the alternative in which the shape parameter exceeds unity would be appropriate, while if systems are undergoing reliability growth the alternative would be that the shape parameter is less than unity. View full abstract»

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  • MIL-STD-781C: A Vicious Circle

    Page(s): 397 - 402
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    Reliability practitioners have confused theorists about the true area of application of MIL-STD-781C. This has occurred because theorists have neglected to explain important basic concepts to practitioners. This paper analyzes the situation in detail. View full abstract»

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  • On Estimating Component Reliability for Systems with Random Redundancy Levels

    Page(s): 403 - 407
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    Redundancy is a well understood and widely used design factor which can contribute appreciably to improve the reliability of a system. Reliability is improved, for example, when any fixed component is replaced by a parallel system of independent, identically distributed components. In this study, we discuss and treat problems in which the level of redundancy, K, is a random variable governed by a (known or unknown) discrete probability model. Given repeated observations on K and on the lifetime of a parallel system with K independent, identically distributed components, an estimator is derived for the reliability of the individual components. The consistency of the estimator is established, and its asymptotic distribution theory is discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Free proceedings

    Page(s): 407
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  • A Preliminary Test Estimator of Reliability in a Life-Testing Model

    Page(s): 408 - 410
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    This paper proposes a preliminary test estimator for the reliability of an exponential life-testing model. The optimum critical values for preliminary test and their corresponding levels of significance are obtained based on a minimax regret function. View full abstract»

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  • A New Nonparametric Growth Model

    Page(s): 411 - 418
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    This paper proposes a new nonparametric reliability growth model for the analysis of the failure rate of a system that is undergoing development test. The only restrictions on the actual, unknown failure distribution for each stage of testing is that it be continuous, have only one unknown parameter ¿, and have an associated unimodal likelihood function. No assumptions regarding the parametric form of the failure rate of the development process are made, only that there is no decay in the reliability of the system during the design changes. The parameters are assumed to be ordered from one test stage to the next such that ¿1 ¿ ¿2 ¿ ... ¿ ¿m. The new model performs very well based on relative error and mean square error. The model is generally superior to the popular AMSAA model, regardless of the actual underlying failure process. In addition, the results indicate a notable bias in the AMSAA model, early in the development process, regardless of the actual underlying failure process. View full abstract»

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  • Correspondence Items

    Page(s): 418
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  • A Comparison of Several Component-Testing Plans For A Parallel System

    Page(s): 419 - 424
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    We consider a parallel (1-out-of-n:G) system of n components with constant failure rates and treat three different classes of component testing procedures all of which guarantee that the given consumer and producer risks are not exceeded. It is necessary to impose certain restrictions on the magnitude of the unknown failure rates for guaranteeing the producer risk. The three classes of component test procedures use Type-I censoring and use decision rules based on: A) the total number of component failures during the testing periods, B) the number of failures for each individual component, and C) the maximum likelihood estimate of system reliability. Based on the requirement that both the consumer and producer risks lie within specified levels, class A plans exhibit lower testing costs in the selected numerical examples. View full abstract»

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  • A Component-Testing Procedure For A Parallel System With Type II Censoring

    Page(s): 425 - 428
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    We consider the problem of acceptance testing for a parallel (1-out-of-n:G) system of n different components with constant failure rates. The components are individually tested and the tests are terminated as soon as a preassigned number of each component fails. This paper provides a criterion for accepting or rejecting the system based on the product of the total times on test for each component. The critical level for the test statistic is chosen so as to guarantee that the specified levels of consumer and producer risks on the system reliability are not exceeded. If the testing costs depend on the number of each component tested, aminimum-cost procedure can be found from the feasible set of plans. View full abstract»

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  • Sensitivity Study of the Cumulant Method for Evaluating Reliability Measures of Two Interconnected Systems

    Page(s): 429 - 432
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    The rationale for using the cumulant method to take advantage of its computational efficiency is well known among power system planners. However, although an analysis of the sensitivity of the univariate Gram-Charlier series has been investigated, an equivalent analysis of the sensitivity of the bivariate Gram-Charlier series has not yet been reported in the literature. This paper investigates the sensitivity of the bivariate Gram-Charlier series in the evaluation of reliability for several types of interconnected systems. The impact of different number of terms in the series on the accuracy of the results as well as on the computational requirements is also investigated. Load correlation between the interconnected systems is considered. As anticipated, the cumulant method is much faster than the commonly used recursive method. However, the reliability indexes, obtained using this method for interconnected systems with low reserve margin and with units of low forced outage rates can not be trusted. The relative error in the calculation of the loss of load probabilities increases with the increase of tie line capacity. However, the error is greatly reduced if the systems have units of higher forced outage rate. The use of additional terms in the bivariate Gram-Charlier series increases somewhat the accuracy of the results but also increases the computational time. View full abstract»

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  • Practical Papers

    Page(s): 432
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  • On the Evaluation of the Reliability of k-out-of-n Systems

    Page(s): 433 - 435
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    The paper provides some correcting remarks on several methods to determine the k-out-of-n:G system reliability - a problem that has taken more than its share in the literature. A Jain-Gopal paper presents two algorithms JG-1 and JG-2 to evaluate the reliability of a k-out-of-n System. The comparison of the computational costs of JG-1 with those of JG-2 and with other existing algorithms, especially Barlow-Heidtmann, need to be restated. View full abstract»

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  • Reliability Analysis for a Real Non-Coherent System

    Page(s): 436 - 439
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    This paper shows a real non-coherent system, calculates its unavailability, failure frequency, some measures for the element importance, and the optimum sequence for diagnosis and repair. The unique characteristic of its non-coherence is discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Annual Reliability & Maintainability Symposium Proceedings Price List for 1987

    Page(s): 439
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  • Dependability Evaluation of Integrated Hardware/Software Systems

    Page(s): 440 - 444
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    A methodology for predicting the dependability (reliability and availability) of an integrated realtime hardware/software system using a semi-Markov process is described. This methodology was used to evaluate the reliability of the shuttle mission simulators at the NASA Johnson Space Center. View full abstract»

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  • A Minimizing Algorithm for Sum of Disjoint Products

    Page(s): 445 - 453
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    This paper describes a minimizing version of the Abraham sum-of-disjoint products (sdp) algorithm, called the Abraham-Locks-Revised (ALR) method, as an improved technique for obtaining a disjoint system-reliability formula. The principal changes are: 1) Boolean minimization and rapid inversion are substituted for time-consuming search operations of the inner loop. 2) Paths and terms are ordered both according to size and alphanumerically. ALR reduces the computing cost and data processing effort required to generate the disjoint system formula compared to the seminal 1979 Abraham paper, and obtains a shorter formula than any other known sdp method. Very substantial savings are achieved in processing large paths of complex networks. View full abstract»

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  • Improved Bounds for System-Failure Probability

    Page(s): 454 - 458
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    The inclusion-exclusion formula can be used to obtain upper and lower bounds on system-failure probability. This paper shows that the bounds can be improved by using information contained in them. Algorithms are provided to find the improved probability bounds, along with examples. Also discussed are the conditions under which the improved bounds are advantageous. View full abstract»

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  • Application of a Correlation Model to Analyze Dependent Variables

    Page(s): 459 - 462
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    A methodology is explained to study the dependency between two variables. The correlation coefficient between two variables is used as a measure of the degree of dependency. A bootstrap technique accounts for the statistical uncertainty in the correlation coefficient that is estimated from the data. A computer program, Correlation Coefficient Generator (CCG), was developed to perform the analysis. The methodology is demonstrated by an example that determines the statistical dependence between specific actions of control-room operator of a nuclear power plant. The methodology and the CCG code are effective and easy to use. View full abstract»

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  • Hazard Rates and Generalized Beta Distributions

    Page(s): 463 - 466
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    This paper considers the behavior of the hazard rates of the Generalized gamma, and beta of the first and second kind. The hazard functions include strictly decreasing, constant, strictly increasing, ¿ and ¿ shaped hazard rates. By considering the generalized distributions a unified development for such distributions as beta type 1, beta type 2, Burr types 3 and 12, power, Weibull, gamma, Lomax, Fisk, uniform, Rayleigh, and exponential are included as special cases. The results are conveniently summarized in three figures. The generalized distributions considered in this paper are seen to provide models for all of the different shaped hazard rates mentioned above. This flexibility permits the data to determine the nature of the hazard function without its being inadvertently imposed through the selection of an improper model. For example, the selection of a Weibull distribution permits a decreasing, constant, or increasing hazard rate, but not a ¿ or ¿ shaped one. The use of the generalized gamma or either of the generalized beta functions considered in section II does permit realization of these additional shapes for the hazard rate. View full abstract»

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  • Optimum Ordering Policy under Random Lead-Time for Equipment with a Sensor

    Page(s): 467 - 469
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    A replacement model is presented for a single equipment with a sensing device attached, where two kinds of random lead times (one for regular order and the other for expedited order) are considered. Both the equipment and device can fail, and the state of the equipment (good or failed) is monitored by the device and also inspected manually at each ordering time (fixed). Our model shows, under certain conditions, that there exists a finite and unique ordering policy maximizing the cost effectiveness which is used as the criterion for optimality. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Reliability is concerned with the problems involved in attaining reliability, maintaining it through the life of the system or device, and measuring it.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Way Kuo
City University of Hong Kong