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Reliability, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 1964

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): c1
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  • Reliability Group

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): nil1
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  • [Breaker page]

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): nil1
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  • Reliability Programs and the Problem of Attaining High Probabilities of Mission Success in Space Exploration

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 1 - 4
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    The major obstacles to attaining high probabilities of mission success in future space exploration are described to be as follows: dependence on large numbers of propulsive stages in a given vehicle development of relatively many more long-lived components and subsystems than has been possible to achieve to date heed to improve the development process so that a reletively much ower volume of ground and flight testing is needed than formerly to provide confidence in system reliability and fragmentation of responsibilities for flight tests and for technical direction of major programs. Moreover, it is suggested that several aspects of current approach to ``reliability'' might be doing more harm than good, It is then argued that Broader and more uninhibited discussion of difficulties to attainment of high probabilities of mission success is much needed, as well as more widespread, systematic, and intense search for posible failure modes at the system, subsystem, component, and part levels; 3) general persuasion that when reduction in funds occur, that the must largely go into stretching out schedules and not into reducing the volume of ground and flight testing; integrity of communication throughout the mtitiplicity of participating elements and the conviction that, reliability engineering is an inseparable integral aspect of systems engineering. View full abstract»

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  • How much Reliability

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 5 - 7
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    Individually, we may be concerned about a smal portion of the reliability program, Such as probability of success, or economic considerations, or systems effectiveness, or one of the many other reliablility factors, when we should be looking at the whole picture. Reliability is not something that you buy by the piece or pound erdezem and just attach to the equipment, it is something that is inherent in the disian. This places a great responsibility on the design engineer. He must know the safety factor of each and every part, how they can fail, and how to compensate for all the variables. There is no part answer to ``how much reliability;'' it involves many trade-offs, and the final decision will be made as a result of these trade-offs. When figuring ``how much reliability,'' we must consider the routin engineering practices, then add how much it would cost using good reliability practices. Afte this is determined, one must assign a useful Iife span to the equipment, determine the cost of maintenance, the cost of owning the equipment, and the cost of idle equipment. From this informtion, good decisions can be made. There is no quick ans wer to ``how much reliability,'' but it can easly be evalupted and the determination, made. View full abstract»

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  • Environment-Resistant Connector Field Reliability Report

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 8 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    For several years, a very intensive program has existed within the connector industry to attempt to define and measure connector reliability. One of the stumbling blocks in the way of this necessary work has been the lack of actual field application data and the correlation of connector failures to such data. Over the eleven months stretching from January, 1962 through November, 1962, the Boeing Airplane Company received reports from major domestic and international carriers having to do with connector problems occurring in the 707 and the 720 Jet Aircraft. Amphenol's engineers, working with the Boeing Reliability people, have correlated report summaries to the extent that they have separated connector categories according to the specific environmental experiences which the connectors have undergone. This has resulted in the establishment of eight different environmental cycle applications, and the data is arranged so as to produce failure rates associated with each. Also, it is possible to compare various types of connectors as to their ability to withstand extreme environmental shocks reliably. The study involves some 173,707 and 720 Aircraft, which are approximately half the entire jet fleet. It involves 437,000 flight hours, 193,000 departures, and approximately 212,000 total connectors. Connector operating hours are in excess of 400,000,000. This paper is considered unique in that, to the best of the author's knowledge, no other such study has ever been attempted in respect to electrical connectors. View full abstract»

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  • Quantized Probability Circuit Design Principles Applied to Linear Circuits

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 16 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
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    A circuit design method for linear circuits is needed which will adequately predict circuit per formance as a function of component tolerances. This paper describes a method which weights the probable component variation from its nominal value into one of three groups; the group assignment depends on how seriously the component variation affects over-all performance This technique, identified as the quantized probability design (QPD) method, is compared with the absolute worst case (AWC), the Taylor worst case (TWC), and the uniform probability (UP) methods. The QPD procedure is given, based on the circuit performance equation. Two linear circuit applications are presented and analyzed whic show the effect each component will have on circuit performance. A comparison of design methods shows that the quantized probability design predicts less amplifier gain variation. Actual experience has shown that a closer correlation exists with the quantized probability design method, and therefore its use for linear circuits is recommended. View full abstract»

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  • High Reliability Electronic Parts as Justified System Cost Elements

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 29 - 32
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    The planned use of premium electronic parts in a forthcoming system is a logical means for assuring failure-free operation comensurate with the best state-of-the-art. However, an over-all analysis of the value of premium parts must show the net worth of improved system performance to more than offset the added initial parts cost. These costs may be in higher procurement costs, added test and evaluation, or more intangible investments. At the outset, a system-production strategy must establish the best level of investment in such features, based upon a conviction that the ``impact'' upon reliability improvement will justify the added initial costs. This paper treats the difficult problem of evaluating the system reliability ``impact'' introduced by increased parts reliability. The necessity for an early investment strategy will limit the level of analytical sophistication available for predicting reliability. Thus, it is useful to examine the validity of reliability ``parts population analyses'' as first-order justifications for investing in high reliability parts for complex electronic systems. View full abstract»

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  • A Quantitative Analysis of Semiconductor Device Failure Rates as Graphically Indicated in Military Handbook 217

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 33 - 41
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    A graphical presentation of semiconductor device failure rates is made in Figs. 13B and 14B of Mil-Hdbk-217 (see Figs. 1 and 2). From this presentation, Equations may be derived which indicate interesting properties, to failure physicists, device engineers, and equipment designers. On the basis of the equations it may be concluded that: (1) extrapolating room temperature failure rates from failure rates of devices stored at elevated temperatures is not likely to be meaningful; (2) there is a definite relationship between storage failure rate and failure rate in actual use (in the temperature range of interest); (3) the storage failure rate is large enough at normal storage temperatures so that, if semiconductor device failure rates influence the reliability of equipment in which they are used, they will contribute significantly to the finite storage life of the equipment (another way of expressing the last statement is that a manufacturer with a large storage inventory of semiconductors will find a significant decrease in the percentage of usable devices with time);(4) there are some instances (as delineated earlier by equations), when increasing the number of semiconductor devices and dividing the load proportionately improves reliability, and there are other cases when it does not. While the analysis makes no claim as to the validity or accuracy of Figs. 1 and 2, the mathematics permits statements about conditions necessary to confirm the data. View full abstract»

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  • Digital Circuit Redundancy

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 42 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
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    While some original work is presented, this paper is mainly of the nature of a survey of redundancy techniques to date. Several redundancy techniques are described in detail with mathematical models for estimating reliability improvement. The methods are compared on the basis of reliability improvement and general comments are made about applications. The reliability equations for Moore-Shannon, majority, gate connector, and other redundancies, show that Moore-Shannon type of redundancy provides the best reliability improvement An example of a Moore-Shannon redundant flip-flop shows that large reliability improvements are obtained applying redundancy to only the less reliable components, thus keeping the amount of redundancy to a minimum. View full abstract»

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  • Letter to the Editor

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 62 - 63
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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): 64 - 65
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  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1964 , Page(s): c2
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Reliability is concerned with the problems involved in attaining reliability, maintaining it through the life of the system or device, and measuring it.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Way Kuo
City University of Hong Kong