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Spectrum, IEEE

Issue 8 • Date Aug. 1970

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 44
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • [Advertisement]

    Page(s): nil1
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  • [Breaker page]

    Page(s): nil2
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  • [Advertisement]

    Page(s): 1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.

    Page(s): 4
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  • [Breaker page]

    Page(s): 4
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  • [Advertisement]

    Page(s): 5 - 7
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  • Forum

    Page(s): 8 - 10
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  • [Advertisement]

    Page(s): 9 - 14
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  • Correction

    Page(s): 10
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  • News from Washington

    Page(s): 15 - 16
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  • [Advertisement]

    Page(s): 17
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  • Focal points

    Page(s): 18 - 21
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  • [Advertisement]

    Page(s): 19 - 22
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  • Calendar

    Page(s): 23 - 24
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  • [Advertisement]

    Page(s): 25 - 28
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  • Spectral lines

    Page(s): 29
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  • Inductorless filters: a survey I. Electromechanical filters

    Page(s): 30 - 36
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    Since their invention early in the 20th century, filters have played an important role in electronic technology. However, the LC filter, which had been the type most widely used in the past, is now being phased out because of the change in design criterions imposed by the current trend toward microminiaturization. The problem of finding a replacement may be solved by implementing some of the inductorless filter methods described in this two-part article. Part I discusses the two basic groups of electromechanical filters??the monolithic crystal and ceramic types, and the mechanical filter, which is coupled with a transducer. Part II of this article, to appear next month, will consider linear active and digital devices. View full abstract»

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  • Minicomputer applications in the seventies

    Page(s): 37 - 52
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    The purpose of this report is to give the reader, by means of specific application examples, an overview of the extreme versatility of the minicomputer. The basic system configurations that will be described may be adapted, by analogy, to many other tasks. In this manner we hope to stimulate the reader to think about ways in which a minicomputer might be able to do a job for him at less cost, in less time, in a more thorough manner, or more reliably than that job could be done??if it could be done at all??without the minicomputer. It is beyond the intended scope of this report to discuss minicomputer architecture, to describe in detail commercially available minicomputers, or to attempt to offer detailed guidelines for the selection of a specific minicomputer model for a system. View full abstract»

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  • The exponential crisis

    Page(s): 53 - 56
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    An exponential proliferation of technology imposes serious burdens upon society. Consequently, the engineering community will be forced to deliberate more than it has in the past about the social consequences of its acts. In this way, the best interests of both the engineer and society will be served. View full abstract»

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  • Speech spectrograms using the fast Fourier transform

    Page(s): 57 - 62
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    An important aid in the analysis and display of speech is the sound spectrogram, which represents a time-frequency¿intensity display of the short-time spectrum.1-3 With many modern speech facilities centering around small or medium-size computers, it is often useful to generate spectrograms digitally, online. The fast Fourier transform algorithm provides a mechanism for implementing this efficiently. View full abstract»

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  • [Advertisement]

    Page(s): 63 - 66
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  • Noise in amplifiers

    Page(s): 67 - 75
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    In practically every type of research program in the physical sciences as well as in sophisticated engineering analyses, very small electrical signals must be measured and, in general, the limit of attainable precision and detectability is set by noise. This is true for the physicist and chemist performing nuclear magnetic resonance or spectroscopy experiments, for medical and biological researchers interested in evoked potentials, for geologists measuring small remanent magnetic fields in rock samples, for the metallurgist making Fermi surface measurements, and for the engineer performing vibration analysis and sensitive bridge measurements. These are only a few examples of applications in which noise plays a critical role in limiting measurement precision and signal detectability. This article discusses some of the inherent problems and describes techniques for improving signal-to-noise ratio. View full abstract»

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  • At the crossroads in air-traffic control III. View from the cockpit - reactions of some pilots, automatic flight management, flight-control systems, airborne CAS, 'moving map' displays, 'three-dimensional' area navigation, and others

    Page(s): 76 - 89
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    Control of air traffic from the ground is only half the story¿the airborne electronic equipment, displays, instrumentation, and human response are necessary to complete the loop in any practicable system. A few versions of collision-avoidance systems are entirely under airborne control. Based upon experience, pilots are wary of the hazards at certain major airports; in approaching other terminals, however, they have a sense of confidence that is inspired by the existence of the latest ATC equipment and facilities that afford a high degree of safety to pilots, passengers, and aircraft. View full abstract»

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IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

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Susan Hassler
IEEE Spectrum Magazine