By Topic

Journal of Applied Physics

Issue 2 • Date Feb 1942

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • Issue Table of Contents

    Page(s): toc1
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (178 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Physics—the Profession

    Page(s): 71 - 73
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (227 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Conference on the Hardening of Metals

    Page(s): 74 - 75
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (141 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Precipitation Hardening

    Page(s): 75 - 83
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (783 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Frictional Phenomena. VII

    Page(s): 90 - 96
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (529 KB)  

    COLLOIDAL particles present in solutions and suspensions increase the effective viscosity of the solvent. Einstein has presented the theory of this effect valid for spherical particles, and given an equation, deviation between which and experiments being due to either solvation or electric charge of the particles. Elongated particles require a further modification of the formula. The theory is being successfully applied to the study of synthetic fiber molecules, and valuable information as to the shape of the latter can be derived by viscometric measurements on colloidal solutions of such polymers. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Radiation from Carbon Arcs

    Page(s): 97 - 102
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (496 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Anisotropy of Ferromagnetic Powder Particles

    Page(s): 105 - 109
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (298 KB)  

    Measurements of the magnetic moment of sediments of ferromagnetic particles deposited in a magnetic field show that the particles are magnetically anisotropic. The dependence of this anisotropy on the magnetic field is investigated for sediments prepared under different conditions, and its probable origin discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Indexing Powder Diffraction Patterns of Isomorphous Substances

    Page(s): 109 - 112
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (258 KB)  

    Two methods of indexing powder diffraction patterns of isomorphous substances are presented: the first method depends on matching the log d values of two or more isomorphs (d being the interplanar spacing of a given reflection); the second method relates the spacing shifts Δd/d of two isomorphs to the symmetry of the particular crystal system. These methods are made practical by the publication of tabulated powder diffraction data. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Arc Cathodes of Low Current Density at High Amperage

    Page(s): 113 - 116
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (453 KB)  

    From photographs, and from the marking on the electrodes, Slepian and Haverstick found that short duration arcs of 25 amperes in gases at a pressure of a few centimeters had apparent current densities at the cathode of less than 100 amperes per cm2. This is in sharp contradiction to the density of several thousand amperes per cm2 which seems to be required by generally accepted theories of the cold cathode arc. Similar results have been found up to currents of 5000 amperes, burning for 1/120 sec. with electrodes of various metals in air at less than 10‐cm pressure. Apparent cathode current densities calculated from the observed marking on the electrodes were less than 1000 amperes per cm2. The markings on the electrodes were apparently produced by oxidation only, the energy density developed at the electrodes being insufficient to bring the electrode surface to the melting point in the 1/120 second duration of the arc. The circuit interrupting capacity of these short low current density arcs are found to be not less than that of short arcs at atmospheric pressure. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Operational Analysis of Non‐Linear Dynamical Systems

    Page(s): 117 - 128
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (555 KB)  

    An operational method of determining the free and forced vibrations of non‐linear dynamical systems is presented. The method is an operational adaptation of the one developed by Lindsted and Liapounoff. The advantage of the operational procedure is that by using a table of operational equivalents, one may write the various successive approximations almost at a glance. The procedure is illustrated by applications to non‐linear problems in mechanics and electricity. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Note on Temperature Correction Methods in Calorimetry

    Page(s): 128 - 137
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (706 KB)  

    The problem of correcting calorimetric data for thermal leakage has been discussed by King and Grover in a recent paper in this Journal. From their analysis of the problem these authors have concluded that large errors are involved in the usual methods of correcting the data of bomb‐calorimetric measurements, and of experiments by the method of mixtures. In the present note it is shown, in agreement with W. P. White's treatment of calorimetric lag, that in the case of bomb‐calorimetric measurements the errors in question are practically completely eliminated by calibrating the calorimeter experimentally. Since experimental calibration of the calorimeter is the usual practice in modern bomb‐calorimetric measurements, the results of such measurements are not affected by the errors discussed by King and Grover. In the case of measurements by the method of mixtures these errors can be avoided by so conducting the experiment that the final temperature of the calorimeter will be very near the convergence temperature. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

Journal of Applied Physics is the American Institute of Physics' (AIP) archival journal for significant new results in applied physics

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor
P. James Viccaro
Argonne National Laboratory