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Nanobiotechnology, IET

Issue 2 • Date June 2009

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Displaying Results 1 - 4 of 4
  • Bacterial detection using a carbon nanotube gas sensor coupled with a microheater for ammonia synthesis by aerobic oxidisation of organic components

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 15 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (549 KB)  

    In this study, the authors propose a new bacteria detection method using a carbon nanotube (CNT) gas sensor and a microheater, which were coupled into a Bio-MEMS (microelectromechanical systems)-type device. Bacteria were heated by the microheater in air so that ammonia (NH3) gas can be generated by the oxidation reaction of organic components of bacteria. Thus generated NH3 gas was detected by using the CNT gas sensor, which was fabricated by dielectrophoresis (DEP) and combined with the microheater to form a small chamber. Cyclic pulsed heating operation was employed so that the CNT response to elevated temperature did not mask NH3 response. It was demonstrated that the proposed device could detect and quantify 107 bacteria cells (Escherichia coli). Possible application of DEP to trap and enrich target bacteria on the microheater was also discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Preparation of carboxyl-coated polystyrene nanoparticles using oleic acid

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 23 - 27
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (188 KB)  

    Novel carboxyl group-decorated crosslinked polystyrene nanoparticles were prepared via the soapless emulsion polymerisation of styrene and divinyl benzene with oleic acid as functional comonomer. The existence of the surface carboxyl group was verified by zeta potential analysis. Particle sizes of the functional nanoparticles prepared with the proposed method were found to be in the range of 60-100-nm by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analyses. Functionalised nanoparticles are proposed as carriers for biomolecules or drugs. View full abstract»

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  • Dielectric and dielectrophoretic properties of DNA

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 28 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (355 KB)  

    The physical properties of DNA are quite important for molecular genetics as well as for its nanotechnological applications. Studying the interactions of alternating current (AC) electric fields with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) allows one to draw conclusions about these properties. These interactions are usually investigated in two different ways. In dielectric spectroscopy, a DNA solution is placed in a homogeneous AC field and electronic parameters are measured over several frequency decades in the Hz to GHz range. These electronic data are then interpreted on the basis of physico-chemical models as a result of certain phenomena on the molecular level. In dielectrophoretic studies, a DNA solution is exposed to an inhomogeneous AC field and the spatial response of few or single molecules is monitored by optical or scanning force microscopy. This response can involve translation, elongation and orientation of the molecular strings. In this review, a survey is given of the literature dealing with the dielectric and dielectrophoretic properties of DNA as well as with applications of DNA dielectrophoresis. View full abstract»

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  • Localised heating of tumours utilising injectable magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia cancer therapy

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 46 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (511 KB)  

    This study reports an investigation of hyperthermia cancer therapy utilising an alternating magnetic field to induce a localised temperature increase on tumours by using injectable magnetic nanoparticles. In-vitro and in-vivo experiments represent the feasibility of hyperthermia cancer therapy. A feedback temperature control system was first developed to keep the nanoparticles at a constant temperature to prevent overheating in the tumours such that a safer and more precise cancer therapy becomes feasible. By using the feedback temperature control system, magnetic nanoparticles can be heated up to the specific constant temperatures, 37, 40, 42, 45, 46 and 47degC, respectively, with a variation less than 0.2degC. With this approach, the in-vitro survival rate of tumour cells at different temperatures can be systematically explored. It was experimentally found that the survival rate of cancer cells can be greatly reduced while CT-26 cancer cells were heated above 45degC. Besides, localised temperatures increase as high as 59.5degC can be successfully generated in rat livers by using the proposed method. Finally, complete regression of tumour was achieved. The developed method used injectable magnetic nanoparticles and may provide a promising approach for hyperthermia cancer therapy. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IET Nanobiotechnology covers all aspects of research and emerging technologies including fundamental theories and concepts applied to biomedical-related devices and methods at the micro- and nano-scale.

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