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Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date March 1993

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Medical image matching-a review with classification

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 26 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (130)  |  Patents (34)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1859 KB)  

    A classification scheme for multimodal image matching is considered. The scope of the classification is restricted to methods that register data after acquisitions. The classification scheme may be used for any modality; not only for (2-D) projection images and (3-D) tomographic images, but also for other signal modalities that provide spatial insight into function or anatomy, e.g., EEG (electroencephalography) or MEG (magnetoencephalography) and for the real physical patient. The available literature on image matching is discussed and classified.<> View full abstract»

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  • Representation of medical images by visual response functions

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 40 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1066 KB)  

    A short introduction to the representation of images by visual response functions is presented. The aim is to show how some specific characteristics or features of an image can be found by a machine observer. Edges, flat regions, regions with saddle points, corners, etc. can be found by appropriate convolution of the image with the visual response functions (VRFs). The scale is selected such that noise effects are minimized and/or the desired features are emphasized, followed by a selection operation, usually nonlinear, such as thresholding. In the particular case of medical images, the zero crossings of the Gaussian Laplacian and of the umbilicity operators are being investigated as descriptors of prior information for a specific case.<> View full abstract»

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  • Hierarchical interpolation

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 48 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (982 KB)  

    A state-of-the-art report on reversible (or lossless, or error-free, or information preserving) compression of medical images is presented. Reversible compression consists of two steps, decorrelation and coding. Methods for intraframe decorrelation of 2-D images can be divided into three classes, viz., transform, predictive, and multiresolution decorrelation. Transform decorrelation methods are found to be unsuited for reversible compression. DPCM (differential pulse code modulation) the best predictive method, decorrelates well, but has a great disadvantage in its parameter dependency.<> View full abstract»

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  • On decision making in tomography

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 56 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (688 KB)  

    The author argues that although decision-making operations are not viewed as part of computerized tomography proper, it is possible to incorporate decision-making operations into reconstruction algorithms. Moreover, doing that will result in solutions more precise than the solutions obtained with the traditional two-step approach. The discussion attempts to demonstrate that it is possible to develop algorithms producing various attributes of reconstructed images or other images related to them directly from the projection data. These ideas are illustrated through examples.<> View full abstract»

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  • Requirements for picture archiving and communications

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 62 - 69
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1029 KB)  

    The current outlook for picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) in day-to-day clinical use is examined. After reviewing the components of a PACS, a set of requirements for a clinically acceptable system is outlined. The PACS concept employed by the US military is presented as an example of an integrated approach to a filmless hospital. Clinical evaluation, future applications, and current limitations of PACS technology are also reviewed.<> View full abstract»

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  • Image management and communications for radiology

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 70 - 80
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1375 KB)  

    The authors address radiology image management and communication systems (IMAC) in the context of hospital-wide patient care activities. Some features of radiology imaging operations are discussed along with a specific example of the image capable network now under development at Georgetown University Medical Center. Some detail and specific data on operational aspects of radiology service within a hospital are also described.<> View full abstract»

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  • Tissue classification and segmentation of MR images

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 81 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (14)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (598 KB)  

    Previously reported classification or segmentation methods are reviewed, and some statistical approaches that may be capable of automatically classifying tissues and segmenting magnetic resonance (MR) images are discussed. The image segmentation methods reviewed are edge detection methods and region detection methods. The key feature of statistical approaches toward automatically classifying tissues and segmenting MR images is the determination of the number of image classes and the model parameters of these classes from the image data directly by a computer. Any free parameter requiring extensive user interactions should be avoided. Further research on the Gaussian Markov random field (GMRF) model and the MRF penalty term will push the statistical approaches further along the automatic track. As these approaches become more practical they will become more valuable.<> View full abstract»

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  • Clinical utilization of grayscale workstations

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 86 - 100
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1881 KB)  

    The factors influencing the image fidelity of gray-scale monitors and how they are determined through both physical and psycho-physical measurements are discussed. Estimation techniques for the amount of image data to be displayed, both the daily digital image data volume and the estimation of the number of gray-scale display stations required, are also examined. Gray-scale display station hardware and software designs are presented. It is pointed out that exceptional attention must be paid to the details of workstation design, as this is the sole interface of the radiologist to the resources of the digital image management network.<> View full abstract»

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  • Predicting osseous changes in ankle fractures

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 103 - 110
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1094 KB)  

    A quantitative assay of subtle morphologic changes that are induced in the trabecular structure of weight-bearing bones as a result of immobilization prescribed as part of routine clinical management is investigated. It is postulated that a clinically meaningful structural measure can be inferred from comparatively small, relatively uniform regions of trabecular bone, which are easily isolated from conventional transmission radiographs. This approach derives from the observation that common transmission radiographs of alveolar bone contain trabecular regions with spatial attributes that are statistically independent of image magnification over a reasonable range of spatial frequencies. Selecting these regions for analysis is advantageous because certain attributes of the resulting data are theoretically independent of the focal-object distance used to produce the original radiograph. Therefore, the size and shape of the irradiated tissue mass do not influence the measurement, as they do in morphometric-based analysis.<> View full abstract»

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  • Surface and volume rendering techniques to display 3-D data

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 111 - 119
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1482 KB)  

    An overview of 3-D rendering techniques of medical data is presented. It is pointed out that volume rendering, and especially ray tracing, can be considered to be the most sophisticated and general method to display 3-D medical data. However, surface rendering still remains the most relevant technique for displaying noncommensurate information such as anatomical atlases. Hence, one of the main practical issues is to select the most appropriate image rendering method, based on the data acquisition modes and the medical relevance. The future of 3-D medical imaging is also discussed.<> View full abstract»

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  • Robotic surgery

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 120 - 125
    Cited by:  Papers (8)  |  Patents (104)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (858 KB)  

    The application of an active surgical robot, the Surgical Assistant Robot for Prostatectomy (SARP), to transurethral resection of the prostate is discussed. SARP performs surgery under the supervision of a surgeon. The mechanical construction computing system, software, motion controller and image system of SARP are discussed.<> View full abstract»

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  • The retrospectroscope-the bite of pain (electrotherapy)

    Publication Year: 1993 , Page(s): 135 - 136
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (275 KB)  

    A brief historical survey of methods used by physicians and dentists to relieve pain is presented. The use of electricity is emphasized. The methods utilized range from the use of the black torpedo fish, which has a 150-V discharge and peak power output of 1 kW, to TENS stimulation.<> View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine contains articles on current technologies and methods used in biomedical and clinical engineering.

 

This Magazine ceased publication in 2010. The current retitled publication is IEEE Pulse.

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