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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 1984

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Displaying Results 1 - 22 of 22
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Computer Society

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): nil1
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  • [Breaker page]

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): nil1
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  • Editorial

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 1
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  • Guest Editorial: Software Engineering Project Management

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 2 - 3
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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  • Software Engineering Economics

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 4 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (107)  |  Patents (12)
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    This paper summarizes the current state of the art and recent trends in software engineering economics. It provides an overview of economic analysis techniques and their applicability to software engineering and management. It surveys the field of software cost estimation, including the major estimation techniques available, the state of the art in algorithmic cost models, and the outstanding research issues in software cost estimation. View full abstract»

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  • Software Development Management Planning

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 22 - 26
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
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    The lack of comprehensive planning prior to the initiation of a software development project is a very pervasive failing. This paper walks through a sample software development plan discussing the various areas that a software development manager should address in preparing his project's plan. Various considerations and suggestions are presented for each of the management subject areas. How the user/customer can use the developer's plan to aid in monitoring of his software's evolution is also presented. Detailed planning of a software development project is necessary to the successful completion of the project. View full abstract»

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  • Managing Software Development Projects for Maximum Productivity

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 27 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
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    In the area of software development, data processing management often focuses more on coding techniques and system architecture than on how to manage the development. In recent years, ``structured programming'' and ``structured analysis'' have received more attention than the techniques software managers employ to manage. Moreover, these coding and architectural considerations are often advanced as the key to a smooth running, well managed project. This paper documents a philosophy for software development and the tools used to support it. Those management techniques deal with quantifying such abstract terms as ``productivity,'' ``performance,'' and ``progress,'' and with measuring these quantities and applying management controls to maximize them. The paper also documents the application of these techniques on a major software development effort. View full abstract»

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  • Software Quality Assurance

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 36 - 41
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
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    This paper describes the status of software quality assurance as a relatively new and autonomous field. The history of its development from hardware quality assurance programs is discussed, current methods are reviewed, and future directions are indicated. View full abstract»

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  • The Software Engineering Shortage: A Third Choice

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 42 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    As interest in the concepts and methods of software engineering increases, many companies, particularly in aerospace, find it difficult to acquire software developers with the desired skills. The option of full-time, company-based training is discussed with suggestions for implementation. Lessons learned from the actual implementation of such a program are discussed along with possible directions for future evolution. View full abstract»

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  • Managing Software Engineering Projects: A Social Analysis

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 49 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (18)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4008 KB)  

    Managing software engineering projects requires an ability to comprehend and balance the technological, economic, and social bases through which large software systems are developed. It requires people who can formulate strategies for developing systems in the presence of ill-defined requirements, new computing technologies, and recurring dilemmas with existing computing arrangements. This necessarily assumes skill in acquiring adequate computing resources, controlling projects, coordinating development schedules, and employing and directing competent staff. It also requires people who can organize the process for developing and evolving software products with locally available resources. Managing software engineering projects is as much a job of social interaction as it is one of technical direction. This paper examines the social arrangements that a software manager must deal with in developing and using new computing systems, evaluating the appropriateness of software engineering tools or techniques, directing the evolution of a system through its life cycle, organizing and staffing software engineering projects, and assessing the distributed costs and benefits of local software engineering practices. Ths purpose is to underscore the role of social analysis of software engineering practices as a cornerstone in understanding what it takes to productively manage software projects. View full abstract»

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  • Making Software Visible, Operational, and Maintainable in a Small Project Environment

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 59 - 67
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3198 KB)  

    Practical suggestions are presented for effectively managing software development in small-project environments (i.e., no more than several million dollars per year). The suggestions are based on an approach to product development using a product assurance group that is independent from the development group. Within this check-and-balance management/development/product assurance structure, a design review process is described that effects an orderly transition from customer needs statement to software code. The testing activity that follows this process is then explained. Finally, the activities of a change control body (called a configuration control board) and supporting functions geared to maintaining delivered software are described. The suggested software management practices result from the experience of a small (approximately 100 employees) software engineering company that develops and maintains computer systems supporting real-time interactive commercial, industrial, and military applications. View full abstract»

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  • Reviews, Walkthroughs, and Inspections

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 68 - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
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    Formal technical reviews supply the quality measurement to the ``cost effectiveness'' equation in a project management system. There are several unique formal technical review procedures, each applicable to particular types of technical material and to the particular mix of the Review Committee. All formal technical reviews produce reports on the overall quality for project management, and specific technical information for the producers. These reports also serve as an historic account of the systems development process. Historic origins and future trends of formal and informal technical reviews are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Software Engineering Project Standards

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 73 - 78
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    Software Engineering Project Standards (SEPS) and their importance are presented in this paper by looking at standards in general, then progressively narrowing the view to software standards, to software engineering standards, and finally to SEPS. After defining SEPS, issues associated with the selection, support, and use of SEPS are examined and trends are discussed. A brief overview of existing software engineering standards is presented as the Appendix. View full abstract»

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  • Elements of Software Configuration Management

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 79 - 87
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2185 KB)  

    Software configuration management (SCM) is one of the disciplines of the 1980's which grew in response to the many failures of the software industry throughout the 1970's. Over the last ten years, computers have been applied to the solution of so many complex problems that our ability to manage these applications has all too frequently failed. This has resulted in the development of a series of ''new'' disciplines intended to help control the software process. This paper will focus on the discipline of SCM by first placing it in its proper context with respect to the rest of the software development process, as well as to the goals of that process. It will examine the constituent components of SCM, dwelling at some length on one of those components, configuration control. It will conclude with a look at what the 1980's might have in store. View full abstract»

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  • Performance Analyses of Cartesian Product Files and Random Files

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 88 - 99
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
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    In this paper, we shall derive two formulas for the average number of buckets to be examined over all possible partial match queries for Cartesian product files and random files, respectively. The superiority of the Cartesian product file is established. A new multi-key file, called a partition file, is introduced. It is shown that both Cartesian product files and random files are special cases of partition files. View full abstract»

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  • Performance Improvement of Abstractions Through Context Dependent Transformations

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 100 - 116
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    The use of abstractions enhances several aspects of a software system, especially its maintainability, reusability, and comprehensibility. However, it decreases the performance of the software. Context dependent transformations can effectively remove the performance loss of abstractions while preserving all their advantages. We state the conditions which the transformations should satisfy and develop four general transformation rules. Language mechanisms are proposed which permit the transformation directives to be embedded in the source code. This can be used to automate the transformations. It also facilitates an approach to incremental performance improvement. View full abstract»

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  • A Method for Improving String Pattern Matching Machines

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 116 - 120
    Cited by:  Papers (15)  |  Patents (1)
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    This correspondence describes an efficient string pattern matching machine to locate all occurrences of any of a finite number of keywords and phrases in an arbitrary text string. Some conditions are defined on the states of the machine in order to improve the speed and size of the machine by Aho and Corasick [1]. The pattern matching algorithm is partitioned into various cases by combining these conditions. Finally, the correspondence illustrates the proposed approach by applying it to the analysis of the machines for a simple search. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE copyright form

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 121 - 122
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  • Information for authors

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 123
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  • Advance Announcement

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 124
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  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): c2
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org