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Military Electronics, IRE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date April 1959

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): c1
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  • IRE Professional Group on Military Electronics

    Publication Year: 1959
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  • [Breaker page]

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): nil1
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  • Krafft A. Ehricke [Biography]

    Publication Year: 1959
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  • Guest Editorial

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 26
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  • Some Problems in Ionic Propulsion Systems

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 27 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    Some of the problems and applications of ionic propulsion systems are discussed. Three different systems' optimization criteria are considered: the maximization of the initial acceleration of a space vehicle; the minimization of the total-mass-to-payload-mass ratio; and the minimization of the propellant mass required to refuel the vehicle. The production, acceleration, and neutralization of beams of singly-ionized cesium ions is also discussed in limited detail. A hot tungsten contact-catalyst type of ion source is assumed and some experimental results with such a source are reviewed. Finally, a simplified treatment of the space charge neutralization of a positive ion beam in the region behind the space vehicle is presented. In this treatment, the positive-ion beam is replaced by an infinitely-long cylinder of uniformly-distributed positive charge. Electrons are emitted from an annular filament encircling the perimeter of the beam. It is shown that this approximation leads to radial oscillations of the electrons through the positive column. View full abstract»

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  • Plasma Propulsion Devices for Space Flight

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 34 - 41
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    An analysis of some of the more immediate space missions indicates that a large increase in payload can be achieved when electrical propulsion is used instead of chemical propulsion. For missions in the gravitational field of the Earth and to the Moon, the optimum specific impulse range for electrical propulsion is from about 1500 to 5000 seconds. Electrical propulsion with neutral plasma devices operate well in this specific impulse range as well as at higher specific impulses. Three different chambers have been described as examples of devices using neutral plasmas. Some of the factors which limit the range of efficient operation of such devices have been discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Plasma Propulsion Possibilities

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 42 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Plasma propulsion systems are arranged in three categories according to the cyclic nature of the jet produced; 1) steady, 2) alternating or wave-accelerated, and 3) pulsed. Typical systems within each category are described with emphasis on work being done at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The criteria for evaluating the relative merits of these systems are listed and the advantages and disadvantages pointed out. Such parameters as energy efficiency and propellant utilization must be measured before conclusions can be reached as to the eventual applicability of any of these systems. View full abstract»

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  • A Brief Survey of Direct Energy Conversion Devices for Possible Space-Vehicle Application

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 46 - 51
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
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    A brief review is given of various types of devices for converting heat or radiant energy directly into readily available electrical form. These devices include the thermoelectric generator, the photovoltaic cell, the thermionic converter, and the photoemissive converter. The discussion is from the point of view of possible space-vehicle application. An attempt is made to indicate in a general way the present state of development, the advantages and difficulties associated with each device, and to suggest general lines of future research. View full abstract»

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  • Fusion for Space Propulsion

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 52 - 57
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The possible role of a controlled thermonuclear reactor in space missions is discussed. Although such a reactor is many years from reality, some of its properties are understood well enough to indicate problems which will appear and which are peculiar to space flight. It appears that it will have to deliver electric power or thrust at a weight of about one pound per kw in order to represent significant improvement over other systems, notably the fission-electric one. One attractive feature of a fusion reactor, as now envisioned, is that it may lend itself to the direct production of electricity or even thrust, without an intermediate heat cycle. It is essential to avoid such a cycle if the weight is to be kept low. View full abstract»

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  • Astronautics and Propulsion

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 58 - 64
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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 65 - 66
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  • Information for authors

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): nil2
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  • Information for authors

    Publication Year: 1959
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  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): c2
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased publication in 1962. The new retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems.

Full Aims & Scope