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Medical Electronics, IRE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date April 1960

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IRE Professional Group on Medical Electronics

    Page(s): nil1
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  • [Breaker page]

    Page(s): nil1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Table of contents]

    Page(s): 59
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  • On Diversification in Medical Electronics

    Page(s): 60
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  • Fast, Automatic Ocular Pressure Measurement Based on an Exact Theory

    Page(s): 61 - 67
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    Several tonometers are described which are simultaneously faster more accurate and more gentle than previous forms. They are easier to use and more convenient to read, and do not generally require anesthesia since their indication is recorded a fraction of a second after they contact the eye. Their principle is such that they can be used while covered with a sterilizable rubber film, thus minimizing risk of infection and clogging of the instrument. New systems of tonography are also described. The factors which allow readings by a component insensitive to variations in corneal curvature, bending forces, tissue tension and surface tension of tears suggest other biological applications such as blood pressure monitoring through intact vessels. A discussion of a number of electronic motion and pressure transducers is included. View full abstract»

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  • Endoradiosondes: Further Notes

    Page(s): 67 - 73
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    This paper is to supplement last year's summary on swallowable radio transmitters. Included are general comments on procedure as well as specific items such as temperature sensitivity, the use of tunnel diodes in pH measurement, the use of multiple transmitters, and the design of a nondirectional receiving antenna system. The latter not only simplifies unattended recording in some cases but also helps in relaying the signal from a small booster transmitter carried by the subject. The frequency shift needed in relaying action is here a frequency doubling provided by suitable nonlinear receiver circuits. View full abstract»

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  • Foreign Body and Kidney Stone Localizer

    Page(s): 74 - 76
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    Various probes are described that will amplify the sound of contact with any hard object in the body and thus signify its presence. One of the most useful forms consists of a sound transducer that clamps to the handle of any pair of forceps so that the surgeon knows when he is grasping a kidney stone or gall stone or other hard body. Also mentioned are active probes in which loading of a bilateral sound transducer, which is being driven by an external electrical circuit, causes an indication of contact as an apparent change in impedance. These forms seem especially sensitive when fitted into the end of a catheter. View full abstract»

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  • X-Ray Visualization and Analysis Using Spectral Infornation

    Page(s): 77 - 79
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    An electronic X-ray system is described which allows more information to be obtained than do the usual radio-graphic methods which lump together the effects of different wavelengths. It gives high contrast images and allows otherwise unnoticeable detail to be detected with a quantitative evaluation of composition. The system has been used to visualize a normal thyroid and analyze it for normal iodine distribution, though a thyroid gland cannot usually be seen at all in a radiograph. An analogy with a new electrocardiographic method is noted. View full abstract»

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  • Television X-Ray Movies: Dose and Contrast Factors

    Page(s): 80 - 86
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    A television link with nonlinear circuits aids X-ray movie production by allowing concentration on a small brightness range, and dose can be determined by the detail to be observed rather than by film properties. A continuously-moving-film camera viewing a single line on the kinescope, or a video tape recorder, need lose the effect of no interacting quantum. The frame rate aspect is considered and a systematic exposure procedure is given. An X-ray beam monitor is also described. The probable course of certain future developments is given as well as suggestions for the best use of existing detectors. View full abstract»

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  • Deflection Focusing of Electron Microscopes

    Page(s): 87 - 94
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    An image in an electron microscope is made to move in response to manipulation of a switch if the image is slightly out of focus. Because of the sensitivity of the eye to motion, even low contrast or dim images can thus be focused very accurately by noting lack of motion. This method is helpful in all cases, but with certain specimen types or with a biased electron gun it is essential. Construction information is given for a magnetic beam deflection unit that has performed well in regular use for over ten years. The electron optics of certain corrections are discussed briefly. View full abstract»

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  • What Is a Nerve?

    Page(s): 94 - 97
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    Many of the observed properties of a nerve are summed up by noting that it appears to be a cascaded series of bistable elements. This implies an electrical negative resistance property which is observed to be tetrode-like, as opposed to arc-like. A time dependent element in the regenerative feedback loop is involved in such things as anode-break stimulation. New nerve analogs are suggested by this view, and the common factor in previous ones is seen. Many excitable plant and animal cells show these properties. A brief general discussion of negative resistance is given. No new biological data is presented. View full abstract»

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  • Switching in Bistable Circuits

    Page(s): 98 - 103
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    Switching or triggering in certain nonlinear circuits having two stable states is studied in graphic detail. The minimum and maximum pulse requirements are discussed and some of the general ideas of bistability considered. A convenient technique for studying the response of circuits, apparently in slow motion, is described. A classroom demonstration relating to nerve impulse generation is given. View full abstract»

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  • Physiological Effects of Condenser Discharges With Application to Tissue Stimulation and Ventricular Defibrillation

    Page(s): 104 - 110
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    The experiments reported in this paper served three major purposes: 1) They defined that property of an electrical discharge upon which the ability to stimulate living tissue depends, in particular the ability to produce a saturation stimulation of the heart. 2) They demonstrated that intense condenser discharges through the chest need not produce any deleterious effects. 3) They showed that one can produce defibrillation of the ventricles of a canine heart, through the closed chest, by such a discharge. View full abstract»

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  • Some Electrical and Radiation Hazards in the Laboratory

    Page(s): 111 - 113
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    Some electrical and radiation hazards which are present in the laboratory are discussed. A constant reminder concerning some of the common dangers is worthwhile since even experienced workers may forget about them and injury or death can result. View full abstract»

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  • Letter to the Editor

    Page(s): 114
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  • Correction

    Page(s): 114
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  • PGME Affiliates

    Page(s): 115
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  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c2
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased publication in 1960. The current retitled publication is Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Full Aims & Scope