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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 9 • Date Sept. 1986

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • In this Issue

    Page(s): nil1
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  • About the cover

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  • IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society

    Page(s): nil1
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  • [Breaker page]

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  • President's Message

    Page(s): 1 - 19
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  • Automated Route Selection for Navigation

    Page(s): 2 - 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (838 KB)  

    Automated vehicle navigation aids for drivers represent an area of considerable research interest. Whereas most previous work on the problem has assumed that such aids should be presented as maps (graphic output on a CRT), recent research suggests that drivers may perform better if given verbal (vocal) directions, rather than a graphic map. Furthermore, anecdotal evidence suggests that people often give directions to others by describing routes which are longer yet simpler than the ones they would normally use themselves. This paper presents an algorithm for selecting paths for travel by road. The algorithm is based on the principle that `ease of description is an important consideration in route selection. The route description is represented by a frame, and the route description cost is approximated by the number of slots in that frame. Then, total route cost is just the sum of the route length and the weighted route description cost. View full abstract»

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  • Humane Intelligence: A Human Factors Perspective for Developing Intelligent Cockpits

    Page(s): 6 - 12
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    A human factors perspective for creating intelligent cockpits is described and explained. A conceptualized interface among the pilots, mental models, and human information technologies is proposed wherein knowledge concerning human cognition is meshed with the capabilities and limitations of artificial intelligence (AI). Necessarily, a different way of looking at the pilot's role in the intelligent cockpit is developed. View full abstract»

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  • A Digital Map Set for the Night Attack Aircraft

    Page(s): 13 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1546 KB)  

    There has been much interest recently in applying cartographic digital data bases to advanced avionics systems as a solution to specific problems associated with night attack aircraft missions. The tremendous computer horsepower required to accomplish this task in real-time in an airborne environment is well documented. Hardware implementation of complex algorithms traditionally has produced custom devices which accomplish a specific function on a specific data structure. Historically, this has resulted in powerful but inflexible systems incapable of adapting to the changing requirements of military missions. In an age of evolving technology, these pitfalls must be avoided by incorporating expected changes into the design of digital map systems. If they are made to accommodate a variety of cartographic data bases and allow for programmable manipulation of those bases, this new class of digital map sets can be reconfigured at the software level to meet the changing requirements of aircraft missions. This paper addresses current design concepts for such a map system on a Night Attack aircraft. The focus is on issues concerning the development and handling of existing map data products to meet current system requirements. This system, called the Digital Map Set (DMS), is being designed to accomplish the classical manipulations of Defense Mapping Agency Digital Land Mass System data. Additionally, aeronautical charts, aerial reconnaissance photos, flight plan data, and other two-dimensional bit mapped graphics also are accommodated. Mission requirements relating to the cartographic data bases shall be discussed along with ground support station and airborne system design issues. View full abstract»

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  • Call for Papers

    Page(s): 19
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  • Computerized Medical Devices: Trends, Problems, and Safety

    Page(s): 20 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1273 KB)  

    Virtually all of the medical devices utilizing electronics will contain a micro or minicomputer by 1990. These devices accounted for $7 billion in U.S. sales in 1984. Their capabilities can provide the means for new or greatly improved medical procedures, and ensure greater patient safety. However, these benefits can easily be compromised if ``computer safety'' is not practiced in the design, manufacturing, testing and clinical use of these devices. Along with a trend to wider usage, the number of recalls of medical devices due to computer-related problems has approximately doubled in the last five years. ``Computer-caused'' problems are often not recognized or reported as such, resulting in an underestimation of the prevalence of this type of problem. Our study of technical factors causing problems in computerized devices revealed that software quality assurance (SQA), the quality of the ac power, and electromagnetic interference are primary factors. Selected design and QA techniques that are well-known in military-aerospace industries can be used to prevent the most prevalent problems occurring in computerized medical devices, without significantly affecting overall device manufacturing costs. View full abstract»

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  • Inside AESS - Organizational Affairs

    Page(s): 25 - 29
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  • Membership application

    Page(s): 29
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  • Chapter 18: How to Publish Your "Confidential" Results

    Page(s): 30 - 31
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  • RTCA Assembly and Technical Symposium

    Page(s): 32
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  • IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society Chapter Chairmen

    Page(s): 32
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  • IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society Organization

    Page(s): 33
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  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c2
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  • Abstracts and References on Artificial Intelligence Software

    Page(s): 1-a - 8-a
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
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tpace@sentech.dsci.com