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Mobile Computing, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 7 • Date July 2009

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • [Inside front cover]

    Page(s): c2
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  • Performance Evaluation of Impulse Radio UWB Networks Using Common or Private Acquisition Preambles

    Page(s): 865 - 879
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2369 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    For impulse-radio ultrawideband (IR-UWB) networks without global synchronization, the first step for correct packet reception is packet detection and timing acquisition: Before recovering the payload of the packet, the destination must detect that the packet is on the medium and determine when exactly the payload begins. Packet detection and timing acquisition rely on the presence of an acquisition preamble at the beginning of each packet. How this preamble is chosen is a network design issue and it may have quite an impact on the network performance. A simple design choice of the network is to use a common acquisition preamble for the whole network. A second design choice is to use an acquisition preamble that is private to each destination. The throughput with the latter choice is likely to be much higher, albeit at the cost of learning the private acquisition preamble of a destination. In this paper, we evaluate how using a common or private acquisition preambles affects the network throughput. Our analysis is based on analytical modeling and simulations. Using our analytical model, we show that a private acquisition preamble yields a tremendous increase in throughput compared to a common acquisition preamble. The throughput difference grows with the number of concurrent transmitters and interferers. This result is confirmed by simulations. Furthermore, additional simulations on multihop topologies with TCP flows demonstrate that a network using private acquisition preambles has a stable throughput. On the contrary, using a common acquisition preamble exhibits the presence of a compounding effect similar to the exposed terminal issue in IEEE 802.11 networks: The throughput is severely degraded and complete flow starvation may occur. View full abstract»

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  • Design of Fair Scheduling Schemes for the QoS-Oriented Wireless LAN

    Page(s): 880 - 894
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2937 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    How to simultaneously achieve fairness and quality-of-service (QoS) guarantee in QoS-oriented wireless local area networks (LANs) is an important and challenging issue. Targeting at this goal and jointly taking priority setting, fairness, and cross-layer design into account, four scheduling schemes designed for the QoS-oriented wireless LAN mainly based on concepts of deficit count and allowance are proposed in this paper to provide better QoS and fairness. Using multiple deficit count to interframe space (IFS) and allowance to IFS mappings for different priorities, enhanced distributed deficit round robin (EDDRR) and enhanced distributed elastic round robin (EDERR) schemes are designed to reduce (or even eliminate) possible collisions, while EDDRR with backoff interval and EDERR with backoff interval schemes still keep the backoff procedure but dynamically adjust backoff intervals for nonfailure events (the events excluding collisions and failed transmissions) depending on the priority setting and deficit count or allowance with a cross-layer design. Through extensive numerical examples, we show that the proposed schemes outperform the closest scheduling schemes in the literature and exhibit much better QoS as well as station-level and flow-level fairness. View full abstract»

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  • Joint Throughput Optimization for Wireless Mesh Networks

    Page(s): 895 - 909
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1011 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we address the problem of joint channel assignment, link scheduling, and routing for throughput optimization in wireless networks with multi-radios and multi-channels. We mathematically formulate this problem by taking into account the interference, the number of available radios the set of usable channels, and other resource constraints at nodes. We also consider the possible combining of several consecutive channels into one so that a network interface card (NIC) can use the channel with larger range of frequencies and thus improve the channel capacity. Furthermore, we consider several interference models and assume a general yet practical network model in which two nodes may still not communicate directly even if one is within the transmission range of the other. We designed efficient algorithm for throughput (or fairness) optimization by finding flow routing, scheduling of transmissions, and dynamic channel assignment and combining. We show that the performance, fairness and throughput, achieved by our method is within a constant factor of the optimum. Our model also can deal with the situation when each node will charge a certain amount for relaying data to a neighboring node and each flow has a budget constraint. Our extensive evaluation shows that our algorithm can effectively exploit the number of channels and radios. In addition, it shows that combining multiple channels and assigning them to a single user at some time slots indeed increases the maximum throughput of the system compared to assigning a single channel. View full abstract»

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  • Greedy Routing with Anti-Void Traversal for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Page(s): 910 - 922
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2455 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The unreachability problem (i.e., the so-called void problem) that exists in the greedy routing algorithms has been studied for the wireless sensor networks. Some of the current research work cannot fully resolve the void problem, while there exist other schemes that can guarantee the delivery of packets with the excessive consumption of control overheads. In this paper, a greedy anti-void routing (GAR) protocol is proposed to solve the void problem with increased routing efficiency by exploiting the boundary finding technique for the unit disk graph (UDG). The proposed rolling-ball UDG boundary traversal (RUT) is employed to completely guarantee the delivery of packets from the source to the destination node under the UDG network. The boundary map (BM) and the indirect map searching (IMS) scheme are proposed as efficient algorithms for the realization of the RUT technique. Moreover, the hop count reduction (HCR) scheme is utilized as a short-cutting technique to reduce the routing hops by listening to the neighbor's traffic, while the intersection navigation (IN) mechanism is proposed to obtain the best rolling direction for boundary traversal with the adoption of shortest path criterion. In order to maintain the network requirement of the proposed RUT scheme under the non-UDG networks, the partial UDG construction (PUC) mechanism is proposed to transform the non-UDG into UDG setting for a portion of nodes that facilitate boundary traversal. These three schemes are incorporated within the GAR protocol to further enhance the routing performance with reduced communication overhead. The proofs of correctness for the GAR scheme are also given in this paper. Comparing with the existing localized routing algorithms, the simulation results show that the proposed GAR-based protocols can provide better routing efficiency. View full abstract»

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  • How Does Multiple-Packet Reception Capability Scale the Performance of Wireless Local Area Networks?

    Page(s): 923 - 935
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1666 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Due to its simplicity and cost efficiency, wireless local area network (WLAN) enjoys unique advantages in providing high-speed and low-cost wireless services in hot spots and indoor environments. Traditional WLAN medium-access-control (MAC) protocols assume that only one station can transmit at a time: simultaneous transmissions of more than one station cause the destruction of all packets involved. By exploiting recent advances in PHY-layer multiuser detection (MUD) techniques, it is possible for a receiver to receive multiple packets simultaneously. This paper argues that such multipacket reception (MPR) capability can greatly enhance the capacity of future WLANs. In addition, the paper provides the MAC-layer and PHY-layer designs needed to achieve the improved capacity. First, to demonstrate MPR as a powerful capacity-enhancement technique, we prove a "superlinearityrdquo result, which states that the system throughput per unit cost increases as the MPR capability increases. Second, we show that the commonly deployed binary exponential backoff (BEB) algorithm in today's WLAN MAC may not be optimal in an MPR system, and the optimal backoff factor increases with the MPR capability, the number of packets that can be received simultaneously. Third, based on the above insights, we design a joint MAC-PHY layer protocol for an IEEE 802.11-like WLAN that incorporates advanced PHY-layer signal processing techniques to implement MPR. View full abstract»

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  • On the Phase Transition Width of K-Connectivity in Wireless Multihop Networks

    Page(s): 936 - 949
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2489 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we study the phase transition behavior of k-connectivity (k=1,2,...) in wireless multihop networks where a total of n nodes are randomly and independently distributed following a uniform distribution in the unit cube [0,1]d (d = 1,2,3), and each node has a uniform transmission range r(n). It has been shown that the phase transition of k-connectivity becomes sharper as the total number of nodes n increases. In this paper, we investigate how fast such phase transition happens and derive a generic analytical formula for the phase transition width of k-connectivity for large enough n and for any fixed positive integer k in d-dimensional space by resorting to a Poisson approximation for the node placement. This result also applies to mobile networks where nodes always move randomly and independently. Our simulations show that to achieve a good accuracy, n should be larger than 200 when k = 1 and d = 1; and n should be larger than 600 when k les 3 and d = 2, 3. The results in this paper are important for understanding the phase transition phenomenon; and it also provides valuable insight into the design of wireless multihop networks and the understanding of its characteristics. View full abstract»

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  • Consistency Management Strategies for Data Replication in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Page(s): 950 - 967
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    In a mobile ad hoc network, data replication drastically improves data availability. However, since mobile hosts' mobility causes frequent network partitioning, consistency management of data operations on replicas becomes a crucial issue. In such an environment, the global consistency of data operations on replicas is not desirable by many applications. Thus, new consistency maintenance based on local conditions such as location and time need to be investigated. This paper attempts to classify different consistency levels according to requirements from applications and provides protocols to realize them. We report simulation results to investigate the characteristics of these consistency protocols in a mobile ad hoc network. View full abstract»

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  • Message Authentication in Computationally Constrained Environments

    Page(s): 968 - 974
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (529 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    RFID and wireless sensor networks exemplify computationally constrained environments, where the compact nature of the components cannot support complex computations or high communication overhead. On the other hand, such components should support security applications such as message integrity, authentication, and time stamping. The latter are efficiently implemented by hash message authentication codes (HMAC). As clearly stated in the literature, current approved implementations of HMAC require resources that cannot be supported in constrained components. An approach to implement a compact HMAC by the use of stream ciphering is presented in this paper. View full abstract»

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  • Distributed Relay Selection and Power Control for Multiuser Cooperative Communication Networks Using Stackelberg Game

    Page(s): 975 - 990
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    The performance in cooperative communication depends on careful resource allocation such as relay selection and power control, but the traditional centralized resource allocation requires precise measurements of channel state information (CSI). In this paper, we propose a distributed game-theoretical framework over multiuser cooperative communication networks to achieve optimal relay selection and power allocation without knowledge of CSI. A two-level Stackelberg game is employed to jointly consider the benefits of the source node and the relay nodes in which the source node is modeled as a buyer and the relay nodes are modeled as sellers, respectively. The proposed approach not only helps the source find the relays at relatively better locations and "buyrdquo an optimal amount of power from the relays, but also helps the competing relays maximize their own utilities by asking the optimal prices. The game is proved to converge to a unique optimal equilibrium. Moreover, the proposed resource allocation scheme with the distributed game can achieve comparable performance to that employing centralized schemes. View full abstract»

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  • Signaling for Multimedia Conferencing in Stand-Alone Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Page(s): 991 - 1005
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3450 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) are infrastructure-less and can be set up anywhere, anytime. They can host a wide range of applications in rescue operations, military, private, and commercial settings. Multimedia conferencing is the basis of a wealth of "killerrdquo applications that can be deployed in MANETs. Some examples are audio/video conferencing, multiplayer games, and online public debating. Signaling is the nerve center of multimedia conferences-it establishes, modifies, and tears down conferences. This paper focuses on signaling for multimedia conferences in MANETs. We review the state of the art and propose a novel architecture based on application-level clusters. Our validation employed SIP as the implementation technology and OPNET as our simulation tool. Our clusters are constructed dynamically and the nodes that act as cluster heads are elected based on their capabilities. The capabilities are published and discovered using a simple application-level protocol. The architectural principles and the clustering operations are discussed. Our SIP-based implementation is also presented along with the performance evaluation. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Computer Society CSDP Certification [advertisement]

    Page(s): 1006
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  • Join the IEEE Computer Society [advertisement]

    Page(s): 1007
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  • Build Your Career in Computing [advertisement]

    Page(s): 1008
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  • TMC Information for authors

    Page(s): c3
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  • [Back cover]

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

Mobile Computing, as proposed in this Transactions, focuses on the key technical issues related to (a) architectures, (b) support services, (c) algorithm/protocol design and analysis, (d) mobile environments, (e) mobile communication systems, (f) applications, and (g) emerging technologies.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Prasant Mohapatra
Interim Vice-Provost and CIO
Professor, Dept. Computer Science
University of California, Davis, USA
pmohapatra@ucdavis.edu