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IEE Review

Issue 1 • Date 21 Jan 1993

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Displaying Results 1 - 3 of 3
  • FLAG unfurls-modern metering and the IEC/FLAG protocol

    Page(s): 35 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (436 KB)  

    Electricity metering is not what it was. In the past few years, advances in technology have brought dramatic changes; the traditional electromechanical meters, and associated time switches, are being replaced by microprocessor-based meters, with a variety of sensors, used to measure directly or indirectly the amount of energy consumed. These new types of meter are very versatile, supporting such facilities as multirate registers, rate switching and recording maximum demand. Here, the author describes how the IEC/FLAG communications protocol meets the needs of meter programming and automatic data collection View full abstract»

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  • Telephones take flight

    Page(s): 45 - 48
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (332 KB)  

    That icon of technology, the passenger jet, was one of the last places in the developed world in which it was impossible to make a telephone call. Now this bastion of isolation is succumbing to digital technology. In-flight passenger telephone services, known generically as airborne public correspondence (APC), have now become an established fact of air travel. Here, the author describes how there are two quite different approaches to providing these services for the passenger: some systems use satellites to provide the radio bearer between the aircraft and the ground, while the so-called `terrestrial' systems use direct air-to-ground radio links View full abstract»

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  • The intelligent aircraft

    Page(s): 23 - 27
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (404 KB)  

    The systems used in a modern military aircraft are so complex that the aircrew generally need the help of high-quality expert systems to do their job properly. Here, the author describes how a modern fighter's sensors produce more information than one person can possibly comprehend in real time. He shows how artificial intelligence techniques offer the key to filtering and presenting the information and providing the means for the pilot to act on it View full abstract»

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