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Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date May-June 2009

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • Computing Now [advertisement]

    Page(s): c2
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  • [Masthead]

    Page(s): 1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • Digital Master

    Page(s): 4 - 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (947 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Randy Kochis enjoys the freedom of correcting gaffes, improvising, and the overall process of trial and error in digital art. He uses Photoshop, layering filter effects so that he gets more intricate patterns, depth, color, and shadows. View full abstract»

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  • Presenting DEViSE: Data Exchange for Visualizing Security Events

    Page(s): 6 - 11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1692 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Discusses DEViSE, a fully customizable system that provides a framework for developing a richer, fuller picture of network traffic. This not only helps locate past, present, and ongoing security attacks but also graphically identifies areas where organizations can implement stricter policies to lower the risk of data loss. View full abstract»

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  • Making Augmented Reality Practical on Mobile Phones, Part 1

    Page(s): 12 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (799 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In 2003, we started an AR framework for mobile phones. We intended its first generation as primarily a proof of feasibility. The second generation was an attempt to port a fully featured PC-based AR framework, Studierstube 4, to a phone platform. You can port existing applications and make them run on mobile phones. However, as we had to painfully experience ourselves, this approach typically produces slow, bloated, and unstable software. Optimally using phones' scarce resources requires different algorithms and architectural decisions than for PCs, leading to a complete reengineering of an existing solution. So, for the third generation, Studierstube ES, we largely abandoned compatibility requirements and added new elements to the design, such as an asymmetric client-server technique, that are specific to mobile devices. In this first installment of our two-part tale of Studierstube ES and what we've learned along the way, we describe the mobile phone platform's restrictions and how our software architecture allows fast development of mobile phone AR applications. View full abstract»

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  • Visual-Analytics Evaluation

    Page(s): 16 - 17
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  • Generating Synthetic Syndromic-Surveillance Data for Evaluating Visual-Analytics Techniques

    Page(s): 18 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3764 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This system generates synthetic syndromic-surveillance data for evaluating visualization and visual-analytics techniques. Modeling data from emergency room departments, the system generates two years of patient data, into which system users can inject spatiotemporal disease outbreak signals. The result is a data set with known seasonal trends and irregular outbreak patterns. View full abstract»

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  • To Score or Not to Score? Tripling Insights for Participatory Design

    Page(s): 29 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (8426 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    For evaluating visual-analytics tools, many studies confine to scoring user insights into data. For participatory design of those tools, we propose a three-level methodology to make more out of users' insights. The relational insight organizer (RIO) helps to understand how insights emerge and build on one each other. In recent years, computers have also been used to develop visual methods and tools that further support the data analysis process. With the advent of the emerging field of visual analytics (VA), the underlying concept of visual tools is taken a step further. In essence, VA combines human analytical capabilities with computer processing capacities. In the human-computer interaction process, the user generates new knowledge and gains insights. View full abstract»

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  • Integrating Statistics and Visualization for Exploratory Power: From Long-Term Case Studies to Design Guidelines

    Page(s): 39 - 51
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (6080 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Evaluating visual-analytics systems is challenging because laboratory-based controlled experiments might not effectively represent analytical tasks. One such system, Social Action, integrates statistics and visualization in an interactive exploratory tool for social network analysis. This article describes results from long-term case studies with domain experts and extends established design goals for information visualization. View full abstract»

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  • Recovering Reasoning Processes from User Interactions

    Page(s): 52 - 61
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3539 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Understanding how analysts use visual-analytics (VA) tools can help reveal their reasoning processes when using these tools. By examining analysts' interaction logs, the authors identified the analysts' strategies, methods, and findings when using a financial VA tool. View full abstract»

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  • Full-Body Avatar Control with Environment Awareness

    Page(s): 62 - 75
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4797 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Interactive control of virtual characters through full-body movement requires accurately reproducing a performer's motion while accounting for surrounding obstacles. The authors' approach, based on a prioritized inverse kinematics solver, satisfies marker and preventive constraints simultaneously. Together with a coupled spine model, it yields virtual character postures that are close to the performer's. View full abstract»

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  • Visual Realism Enhances Realistic Response in an Immersive Virtual Environment

    Page(s): 76 - 84
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    Does greater visual realism induce greater participant presence in immersive virtual environments (VE)? Presence refers to how realistically participants respond to the environment as well as their subjective sense of being in the place depicted by the VE. Thirty-three people were exposed for three minutes to a virtual environment depicting a precipice using a head-tracked head-mounted display system. Seventeen of them saw the environment rendered with real-time recursive ray tracing (RT) that included shadows and reflections of their virtual body, and the remainder experienced the same environment rendered with ray casting (RC), which did not include shadows and reflections. Participants completed a presence questionnaire immediately after their experience, and physiological responses (skin conductance and electrocardiogram) were recorded throughout. Results show that subjective presence was higher for the RT environment than for the RC one and that higher stress was induced in the RT environment compared to the RC one. View full abstract»

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  • Linking Multidimensional Feature Space Cluster Visualization to Multifield Surface Extraction

    Page(s): 85 - 89
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    Data sets resulting from physical simulations typically contain a multitude of physical variables. So, visualization methods should take into account the entire multifield volume data rather than concentrate on one variable. We have developed a visualization approach based on surface extraction from multifield volume data. The extracted surfaces segment the data with respect to an underlying multivariate function. Decisions on segmentation properties are based on the analysis of a multidimensional feature space. We perform feature space exploration using automated multidimensional hierarchical clustering. The hierarchical clusters appear as a cluster tree in a 2D radial layout. In this layout, the user can select clusters of interest. A selected cluster in feature space corresponds to a segmenting surface in object space. On the basis of the segmentation property induced by the cluster membership, we extract surfaces from the volume data. View full abstract»

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  • Sketching Tangible Interfaces: Creating an Electronic Palette for the Design Community

    Page(s): 90 - 95
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (527 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We've shaped our tools and process to support design in a world of tangible interfaces and ubiquitous computing in which the keyboard, mouse, and monitor make way for granular, inexpensive devices that let people augment their daily life. Tangible interfaces can be more natural, intuitive, and efficient than the way we currently interact with digital devices and interfaces. The key to developing these innovations is the ability to use physical-computing materials early during sketching. The tools we create should let designers connect sensors and actuators to computers, to streams of information, and to personal and private networks. To innovate new methods of interaction between analog and digital interfaces, we must be able to not only imagine them but also explore, observe, and demonstrate them. Besides the advantages of observing an interaction in a physically real context, there's undeniable benefit in the ability to show tangible-interface concepts and technologies to others, rather than just describing them. View full abstract»

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  • Tools and Products

    Page(s): 96 - c3
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  • SIGGRAPH 2009 advertisement

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
L. Miguel Encarnação
University of Iowa