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IEEE Spectrum

Issue 5 • Date May 2009

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Displaying Results 1 - 24 of 24
  • IEEE Spectrum - Front cover

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):1 - 3
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  • Where in the world wide web is Al Phillips?

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 4
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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 6
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  • Engineering the future at IEEE

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 8
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  • Forum

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 10
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  • Setting bait to track data thieves

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):11 - 12
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1235 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Seven computers hum through the Rhineland night at the University of Mannheim's Laboratory for Dependable Distributed Systems. All they do is collect bad news and nasty infections from the open Internet. View full abstract»

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  • The mobile infections threat

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 12
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (974 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Why haven't smartphones been overrun by a deluge of viruses the way PCs have? According to researchers at Northeastern University, in Boston, these phones have been safe because no single mobile-phone operating system has achieved a big enough market share for a major virus outbreak to occur. But that could change. View full abstract»

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  • Some bright spots in the gloom

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 14
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (334 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The technology industry is suffering mightily from the global economic crisis. Worldwide semiconductor revenue is expected to drop 24.1 percent in 2009, to US $194.5 billion, according to Gartner, a technology research firm in Stamford, Conn. Meanwhile, revenue from enterprise software-that is, corporate-scale systems- will be flat at about $222 billion. Still, there are some sectors that will gai... View full abstract»

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  • Robotic baby seal could diminish dementia

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 14
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (334 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    It's soft, it's cute, it's cuddly, and it's powered by two 32-bit reduced-instruction-set-computer microprocessors. Paro may look like a toy, but it's quickly attracting the serious attention of rehabilitation researchers. View full abstract»

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  • Touch screens with feeling

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 15
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (507 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    One of the most sought after new features on mobile devices is the touch screen. But that name is a misnomer, according to a group of researchers at Northwestern University, in Evanston, Ill., who point out the obvious-that these displays offer minimal tactile feedback. But suppose touch screens could touch you back: You could "feel," say, the edges of the buttons on a virtual keypad or the links ... View full abstract»

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  • RFID chips gain computing skills

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 15
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (178 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In the 2000 movie Memento, the main character tries to solve the mystery of his wife¿s murder, despite suffering from amnesia that causes his brain to effectively "reboot" every 5 minutes. In the world of computing, "passive" radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips have a similar problem. Dependent for power on infrequent, scavenged RF energy from a reading device, RFID chips may reboot more ... View full abstract»

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  • Ultraviolet radios beam to life

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 18
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (220 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The U.S. military has been chasing ultraviolet (UV) communication for decades. Now researchers say radios that communicate using UV light are finally within reach. Working with the Army Research Lab (ARL) in Adelphi, Md., these researchers are mapping out the steps needed to commercialize UV radios. They¿ve reached the last piece of the puzzle: untangling the poorly understood, extraordinarily co... View full abstract»

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  • A fab life

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):20 - 21
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1887 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Presents a photograph of a clean-room technician holding a polymer film disc that's been embossed with dozens of microchips using Jenoptik's microscale thermoforming process. View full abstract»

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  • The projector project

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):22 - 23
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1593 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    A good high-definition LCD projector can still set you back US $2000, but if your wiring and woodworking skills are up to speed, you can put one together for around $600. It's not like you have to build it from scratch. At least two companies, DIY for Life and DIY Projector Kits, sell kits and supplies that make this something any engineer could do in a weekend. View full abstract»

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  • The truth about Bender's brain

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):24 - 25
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  • Time waits for no engineer

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 25
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  • Unsqueezed

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 26
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (209 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    You might expect a garage-born maker of a niche gadget to lose its fans, crash, and burn when it gets taken over by a large corporation. It didn't happen that way, though, to Slim Devices, the tiny company based in Mountain View, Calif., that created the Squeezebox, one of the first and best-reviewed digital-to-analog audio streamers. View full abstract»

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  • Cloud computing [Reflections]

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 27
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
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  • The million dollar programming prize

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):28 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1742 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Netflix is offering US $1 million for an algorithm that's 10 percent more accurate than the one Netflix uses to predict customers' movie preferences. The AT&T Labs team account is presented. View full abstract»

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  • 25 microchips that shook the world

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):34 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3930 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    microchip design, as in life, small things sometimes add up to big things. Dream up a clever microcircuit, get it sculpted in a sliver of silicon, and your little creation may unleash a technological revolution. It happened with the Intel 8088 microprocessor. And the Mostek MK4096 4-kilobit DRAM. And the Texas Instruments TMS32010 digital signal processor. View full abstract»

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  • Next-gen ultrasound

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):44 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (28)  |  Patents (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4433 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Almost invariably, a new baby's photo album begins with a grainy black-and-white picture taken months before birth - a prenatal ultrasound image, which is often detailed enough to inspire comments about the child's resemblance to various members of the family. But jokes about balding uncles notwithstanding, such scans serve a serious purpose and can prove immensely important, as when they allow do... View full abstract»

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  • Thanks for the memories

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):48 - 51
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    Laptops, workstations, PlayStations, iPhones- they would all be impossible without Robert Dennard's invention of DRAM View full abstract»

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  • High-tech unemployment is up, but not way up

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 64
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    While job losses for computer, electronics, and telecommunications in 2008 were up 50 percent compared with the year before, the news isn't all bad. View full abstract»

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IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

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Editor-in-Chief
Susan Hassler
IEEE Spectrum Magazine