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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date April 2009

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • This month's covers …

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): c2
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 1
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  • In This Issue - Technically

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 2
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  • From the editor-in-chief [Society News & Information]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 3
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  • Multipurpose visualization system

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 4 - 8
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3710 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This deals with the design and architecture of the low-cost Multipurpose Flight Visualization System (MFVS). The MFVS system was originally developed as a passive IFR approach system for small general aviation planes. A relatively high adaptability is one of the main advantages. It can be easily used with many types of avionics devices. The GPSIINS system is used as the primary data source. The data from the GPSIINS system are pre-processed by proprietary neural network units that feed the 3-D visualization system. The neural network unit is responsible for adaptation of this system and can eliminate problems caused by data delays and data drop-outs. The 3D visualization unit processes data from the neural network unit and eventually from the 6DOF tracker that is placed on the pilot's Head Mounted Display (HMD). The unit then generates a 3D view of the surrounding environment that is similar to the 3D environment the pilot knows from flight simulators. The source of environment data is the terrain and object/obstacle database. The image output can be displayed on HIUD, MED, or HMD. View full abstract»

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  • The auditors are coming: A practical guide for engineering projects

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 9 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (6606 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    When management informs you that internal or external auditors are on their way to conduct an audit of your project, you may have many questions and, at times, few answers: Why are the auditors coming? Why now? What are they looking for? How long will the audit take? What can we do to prepare? What help will the project receive in responding to the auditors? This presents a description of the typical audit process, a list of do's and don'ts for projects undergoing an audit, how to design basic audit preparations into the project's design, and resources for further information on auditing issues. View full abstract»

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  • Italian low cost GNSS/INS system suitable for mobile mapping

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 17 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (6542 KB)  

    The first studies for the mobile mapping and creation of a vehicle for this kind of research was carried out by Canadian Researchers in the 1980s. Since then, these vehicles have been widely employed in several applications (road cadastre maps, terrestrial photogrammetry, road sign recognition, etc.) for both commercial and research purposes throughout the world. Many GNSS/INS vehicles which can be equipped in different ways with one or more GPS, inertial sensors, and one or several cameras, have been realized. A characteristic shared by most of these devices concerns the high costs of the sensors, of the realization, and of the maintenance. For this reason, a GNSS/INS system, that is suitable for any vehicle, made up of low-cost devices (two GPS receivers, an INS, and a camera rigidly placed on a metallic bar), have been designed and built by our research group. Two tests run at different velocities have been carried out to evaluate the reliability of the system. After a presentation of the system, the differences that were witnessed during the application of these calibration methods are explained herein. View full abstract»

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  • Call for nominees

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 24
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  • Got software? What managers and engineers need to know

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 25 - 35
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (7895 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As part of a JPL-wide software quality initiative aimed at addressing the challenges of developing, managing, and acquiring software, a team at JPL generated a detailed Software Training Plan for both managers and engineers. The team took the approach of treating the software training program as though it were a system development task and went through all the typical phases of system development including requirements, design, and implementation. During the requirements collection phase, the team conducted dozens of interviews and identified the specific skills needed. The skills fell into categories such as software management, software engineering, systems engineering, and other technical areas. However, an equally important finding was that several "soft" skills were deemed critical for the successful and timely management and implementation of software-intensive systems. This discusses JPL's approach and "lessons learned" from planning and delivering a software training program in an engineering and scientific environment. View full abstract»

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  • Evaluating sensor technology for UAS collision avoidance

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 36 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (7629 KB)  

    The problem of "sense-and-avoid" for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) is genuinely multi-dimensional: there is a wide range of UAS sizes, speeds, and maneuverability, as well as missions for which these UAS will be used. There are also a variety of sensors that might be used for sense-and-avoid, which have widely varying capabilities to measure distance or angle to an obstacle, as well as closing rate, and time to collision. Most sensors are not able to provide all required information about the geometry of an encounter; therefore, using a combination of sensors offers one possible solution. We are investigating the concept that there may be a variety of possible sensor solutions for each distinct UAS capability or mission. By studying the breadth of UAS types and missions, and selectively testing certain sensors in the field, we are evaluating the limits to the capabilities of sensors and sensor combinations. This report is on the progress of this multi-dimensional evaluation. We have scoped the dimensions for evaluating UAS capabilities and the capabilities of sensors. We are experimentally evaluating sensor parameters on a variety of aircraft to validate the specified capabilities. This reports on our methodology for field evaluation of sensor technology and the lessons learned on evaluation platforms and capabilities. View full abstract»

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  • Space dust high-velocity particle influence on electronic equipment

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 44 - 46
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2703 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Determination of failure causes of the control systems and navigation electronic elements of space flying vehicles (SFV), observed in the process of long-time flights, is of current importance. Failures of the control systems in the process of long-time flights considerably reduce their reliability and, consequently, raise expenses in this field. In particular, this requires an additional backup of satellites-retransmitters, which results in an increase of the number of SFV launches. At present, experts are actively elaborating the hypothesis that one of the most probable causes of the SFV electronic system failures are the flows of the space dust particles, moving in the near-Earth and interplanetary space, and possessing velocities from 7.8 km/sec to 16 km/sec. The flows of the high energy (Galactic) ions, for a number of cases, are considered to be the basic cause of the destruction of electronic control systems. This, in particular, makes it possible to explain the failures in flights to Mars of the autonomous space modules performed by the European and American space agencies. The optimum flight route to Mars passes through agglomerations of dust clouds, which necessitates a high probability of collision for the flying vehicles with dust clots. Therefore, the success of the American research module is quite logical, which was done with the highest deviation from the optimum route. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE aerospace & electronic systems society organization

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 47
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  • Directory of IEEE-AESS personnel

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 48
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  • AESS meetings & conferences

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): c3
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  • [Advertisement - Back cover]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
SenTech, LLC - A DSCI Company
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Orlando, FL 32826
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tpace@sentech.dsci.com