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Network, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date March 2009

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • IEEE Network - Front cover

    Page(s): c1 - c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Handover [Editor's Note]

    Page(s): 2 - 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • New books and multimedia

    Page(s): 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Dimensioning network links: a new look at equivalent bandwidth

    Page(s): 5 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (133 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    One of the tasks of network management is to dimension the capacity of access and backbone links. Rules of thumb can be used, but they lack rigor and precision, as they fail to reliably predict whether the quality, as agreed on in the service level agreement, is actually provided. To make better predictions, a more sophisticated mathematical setup is needed. The major contribution of this article is that it presents such a setup; in this a pivotal role is played by a simple, yet versatile, formula that gives the minimum amount of capacity needed as a function of the average traffic rate, traffic variance (to be thought of as a measure of "burstiness"), as well as the required performance level. In order to apply the dimensioning formula, accurate estimates of the average traffic rate and traffic variance are needed. As opposed to the average rate, the traffic variance is rather hard to estimate; this is because measurements on small timescales are needed. We present an easily implementable remedy for this problem, in which the traffic variance is inferred from occupancy statistics of the buffer within the switch or router. To validate the resulting dimensioning procedure, we collected hundreds of traces at multiple (representative) locations, estimated for each of the traces the average traffic rate and (using the approach described above) traffic variance, and inserted these in the dimensioning formula. It turns out that the capacity estimate obtained by the procedure, is usually just a few percent off from the (empirically determined) minimally required value. View full abstract»

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  • Quality of resilience as a network reliability characterization tool

    Page(s): 11 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (206 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With the increased role of resilience in modern networks, the existing quality of service is required to be expanded with service availability and maintainability. Recently, studies have shown the strong limitation of the common availability metrics for measuring the user's quality of experience. In this article a joint specification of QoS definitions with a sophisticated service resilience characterization is proposed, and a concept called quality of resilience is defined. In this unified performance metric, the frequency and length of service interruption are evaluated. It can be used as a tool for characterization of network reliability, as well as comparison and selection of recovery methods. Additionally, by including it in service level agreements, new and more complex requirements of commercial applications can be guaranteed. View full abstract»

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  • Wireless data traffic: a decade of change

    Page(s): 20 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (137 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article presents an overview of the most significant changes in wireless data traffic and its main driving forces throughout the past decade (1998-2008). The main axes of change are discussed: wireless technology, user population, and applications. Evolution of wireless technology realized a 200-fold increase in data rate, and facilitated a continuous enrichment of the traffic mix traversing legacy and modern wireless networks. New applications emerged, such as peer-to-peer file sharing, online gaming, and multimedia, establishing a trend of significant increase in traffic volume. User population has also increased and even saturated some markets. However, not all benefits of wireless technologies are equally exploited, with only a few users exercising high mobility or regularly enjoying multimedia services. Future indications include a requirement for either integration or interoperability of two mainstream wireless technologies, WiFi and cellular, as well as continuous user demand for more bandwidth, broader coverage, and better mobility support. View full abstract»

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  • Handover keying and its uses

    Page(s): 27 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (119 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Mobile nodes must authenticate themselves in order to use network services. When mobile nodes roam into a new cell, they must re-authenticate to the new layer 2 and 3 devices. This re-authentication process can take as long as two seconds, which is unacceptable for applications such as voice over IP. In this article we present several recently developed authentication protocols that can reduce the reauthentication delay. Both intra-domain and inter-domain handover scenarios are discussed. We mainly focus on two protocols - 802.11r and EAP Re-authentication protocol for handover keying. These two protocols use security key hierarchies to avoid full authentication. An application of these protocols is presented for the control and provisioning of a wireless access-point network. View full abstract»

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  • Media handling for multimedia conferencing in multihop cellular networks

    Page(s): 35 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (111 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article addresses the media-handling aspects of multimedia conferencing in multihop cellular networks. Participation in multimedia conferences in MCNs may be confined to either the conventional cellular network or the MANET. Participation also can span both networks. However, neither the media-handling architectures currently in use in conventional cellular networks, nor the ones in use in MANETs are appropriate. When they are used, either the participants in the conventional cellular network, or the ones in the MANETs, might experience long and potentially unacceptable end-to-end stream delays. Furthermore, these architectures are the antipodes of each other. Reconciling them is not an easy task. We evaluate the architectures currently in use in cellular networks and MANETs, show that none is suitable, and propose a new architecture that bridges the two worlds. The new architecture uses the MANET media-handling architectures as a starting point. It is based on media mediators. A media mediator is composed of two functional entities: the media gateway controller mediator and the media gateway mediator. A proof-of-concept prototype was implemented, and extensive simulations were conducted to evaluate performance. View full abstract»

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  • New adversary and new threats: security in unattended sensor networks

    Page(s): 43 - 48
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (110 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Some wireless sensor networks preclude the constant presence of a centralized data collection point, that is, a sink. In such a disconnected or unattended setting, nodes must accumulate sensed data until it can be off loaded to an itinerant sink. Furthermore, if the operating environment is hostile, there is a very real danger of node and data compromise. The unattended nature of the network makes it an attractive target for attacks that aim to learn, erase, or modify potentially valuable data collected and held by sensors. We argue that adversarial models and defense techniques in prior WSN literature about security are unsuitable for the unattended WSN setting. We define a new adversarial model by taking into account special features of the UWSN environment. We show that in the presence of a powerful mobile adversary, securing data stored on unattended sensors presents interesting challenges and opens an exciting new line of research. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Network covers topics which include: network protocols and architecture; protocol design and validation; communications software; network control, signaling and management; network implementation (LAN, MAN, WAN); and micro-to-host communications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Xuemin (Sherman) Shen, PhD
Engineering University of Waterloo