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Nanotechnology Magazine, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date September 2008

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Front cover - IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine - Front cover

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1 - 2
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  • Standards delivery [The Editor's Desk]

    Page(s): 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE-NANOMED 2009

    Page(s): 5
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  • Is nanotechnology the next gold rush? Not without standards!

    Page(s): 6 - 11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2256 KB)  

    This paper introduces the standards for terminology, materials, devices, systems, and processes that involve nanoscale science or technology will allow for order in the marketplace and for R&D researchers and engineers to make measurements and report data consistently in a way that everyone can accept. Standards are needed in order to achieve a high degree of interoperability, create order in the marketplace, simplify production requirements, manage the potential for adverse environmental impacts, and above all, ensure the safety and health of those of us who will be developing and using the next generation of materials and devices.The gold in nanotechnology will be for those that develop the next best material, or the next electronic component that is cheaper, better, and faster than today's CMOS technology, and the tools that will be needed to produce both the materials, and devices. View full abstract»

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  • Surface plasmon nanophotonics: A tutorial

    Page(s): 12 - 18
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    The purpose of this tutorial is to give a practical introduction to surface plasmon nanophotonics. Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are introduced as a waveguide mode at a single interface. It is shown how SPPs in nanostructures can both concentrate the local field intensity and shorten the optical wavelength. Localised surface plasmons (LSPs) are introduced and described using the quasi-static approximation. It is shown how LSPs lead to local field enhancement, which may be further cascaded to achieve additional enhancement. A brief discussion of six application areas of surface plasmon nanophotonics is given: surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing, SERS, enhanced fluorescence, nonlinear optics, nanolithography and sub-wavelength imaging, and optical trapping. View full abstract»

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  • Nanotechnology in Australia--A network of interactions

    Page(s): 19 - 22
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    This paper present the ARC nanotechnology network looks to enhance the collaboration and information exchange to benefit research productivity for nanotechnology. Australia is a large country-greater in area than the United States-and with a population of only about 20 million people, so interactions over large distances are important. This has been recognized by the government through the Australian Research Council (ARC), which funds nearly all major research in Australia, apart from health and medical research, which has a separate funding organization. In 2004, the ARC established a set of research networks, one of which was the ARC Nanotechnology Network (ARCNN), the objective of which was to enhance collaboration and information exchange in a large variety of fields for the benefit of research productivity. The existence of ARCNN, which is administered from the Australian National University in Canberra, has made possible an overview of what is happening in the field today. View full abstract»

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  • Taiwan's march toward nano-enabled industries

    Page(s): 23 - 26
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    Nanotechnology is often referred to as the next industrial revolution. During the past six years, approximately US$100 million per year was invested in nanotechnology research by the government of Taiwan. For a small island country with 23 million people, this is quite a significant investment compared to the investment of approximately US$1 billion per year in the United States, which counts a population of about 300 million. Taiwan has achieved quite an impressive accomplishment in establishing nano core facility centers, broadening public nano education, developing a number of world-class research teams in nanoscience and nanotechnology, and promoting the industrialization of nanotechnology. View full abstract»

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  • Introduction to Spintronics (Bandyopadhyay, S. and Cahay, M.) [Book Review]

    Page(s): 28
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  • The 5th IEEE-NEMS 2010

    Page(s): 30
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  • IEEE Filler Advertisement

    Page(s): 31
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