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Women in Engineering Magazine, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date Winter 2008

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Displaying Results 1 - 22 of 22
  • Front cover - IEEE Women in Engineering Magazine

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1
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  • Exercises of power [Letter from the Editor]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 2
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  • Correction [to "Humanizing Engineering" (Summer 2008, page 6)]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 3
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    In the Summer 2008 issue of IEEE Women in Engineering Magazine the photo caption for the article, "Humanizing Engineering" on page 6 was inaccurate. The caption should read: 2008 Sundance Film Festival-Alfred P. Sloan Prize Winner Alex Rivera (left) and the Sloan Foundation's Doron Weber. View full abstract»

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  • Masthead

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 3
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  • Applying small-scale solutions to large-scale problems [Amperes]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 4 - 5
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    Traveling to other parts of the world is full of surprises and may not always be the vacation you expect it to be. The roads may not be paved, and maybe you shouldn't drink the local water. As citizens of one of the richest nations in the world, Americans are used to certain conveniences that you may not even realize are considered luxuries. View full abstract»

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  • Creating the future, today [Women to Watch]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 8 - 10
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    This past summer, Sophie Vandebroek, Xerox's chief technology officer (CTO) and president of the Xerox Innovation Group, set up a part-time home office miles away from the company's headquarters in Webster, New York. She had recently married an IEEE fellow, Jesus del Alamo, an electrical engineer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and moved to a suburb of Boston. With the advent of new computer technologies, she thought with her old phone number ringing on her laptop and an executive assistant who can send documents straight to her printer--it shouldn't make much of a difference where her office was; she could communicate with most colleagues as easily as if their desks were under the same roof. As a bonus, she could also see firsthand what the future of work life might look like, a key area of Xerox's active research. View full abstract»

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  • Blending technology and the law for cyber security [Women to Watch]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 10 - 11
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    One day last summer, Jody Westby, chief executive officer of Global Cyber Risk, a consulting company in Washington, D.C., that helps corporations and governments safeguard their online information and networks, received a call from a former government minister. The minister told her that he had given his name and password to what turned out to be an online fraud scheme, and now he was worried. Westby, who is a lawyer as well as a cyber security and privacy expert, wasn't terribly surprised. Many computer fraud schemes no longer look like what you may remember from the Nigerian letter scam--those fishy e-mails in which someone impersonating a foreign government official asks for help getting money to an overseas bank account. Today, says Westby, counterfeit Web sites and e-mail scams can "look good." View full abstract»

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  • Guarding ethics in engineering [The Good, the Bad, & the Ugly]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 12 - 14
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    Of the eight subjects that cadets at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut, can major in, half of them fall under engineering. In each discipline - civil, electrical, mechanical, and naval architecture-marine engineering - the curriculum is packed, filled with all the basic math, science, and engineering knowledge a student needs to go on to graduate school, then the Coast Guard. Graduates leave, the academy boasts, with "an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility" and, in that regard, the engineering department has recently taken its program up a notch. View full abstract»

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  • It's a wonderful life

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 16 - 18
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    In the winter of 1988, after millions of viewers watched the Washington Redskins beat the Denver Broncos to win the Super Bowl, ABC aired the pilot episode of a new show called The Wonder Years. The show, about suburban life and adolescence in the late 1960s and early 1970s, followed Kevin Arnold and his family, best friend Paul Pfeiffer, and his first love, Winnie Cooper, played by actress Danica McKellar. McKellar was barely 13 when the show started, and when it ended six seasons later, she decided to take a break from acting and go to college. She enrolled at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she planned to major in film, thinking she'd try her hand at writing and directing. "But I felt my brain getting mushy," she says. "So I decided to take a calculus class, to see if it would make my brain feel sharper." View full abstract»

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  • Lighting the path

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 19 - 20
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    Leadership comes naturally to Wanda Reder, vice president of the Power Systems Services Division of S&C Electric Company, and the president of the IEEE's Power & Energy Society (PES). Reder grew up on a ranch in a small town in western South Dakota and didn't really know what an engineer was. Though her father was mechanically oriented, she says her freshman high school algebra teacher put her on the engineering path. "My teacher said to me, 'If I had to do it over again, I would.' And so that was the beginning. I knew I was going into engineering." View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Power Electronics Society: Growth is a goal

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 21 - 23
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    What do you get when you bring together the strategic minds behind electric automobiles, renewable wind energy, battery-operated toothbrushes, and the iPhone? Potentially a wind-powered car that both cleans your teeth and makes phone calls, but, more likely, a meeting of the IEEE Power Electronics Society, known as PELS. According to Tokyo Institute of Technology Professor and current PELS President Hirofumi Akagi, PELS was formed to "discuss issues of power electronics and keep members up to date" on the industry. One of the main events for all members is the opportunity to get together at the annual Power Electronics Specialists Conference (PESC), which is being incorporated next year into the Energy Conversion Congress and Expo (ECCE). In addition to this large gathering, the Society has various specialized committees with their own objectives. One of these vital committees is the Membership Committee, chaired by Dushan Boroyevich. Boroyevich, who is a professor at Virginia Institute of Technology, Blacksburg, first served in this position in the mid-1990s, then took a hiatus before returning in 2006 to chair the committee charged with increasing Society membership. "The plan of action is twofold," explains Boroyevich. "One goal is to devise plans which will attract new members by exposing to those working in power electronics the benefits of joining the society. The second is to promote activities within the Society so that current members will participate." View full abstract»

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  • Renovating the power system

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 24 - 25
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    The paper presents the career of Keyue Smedley, one of the leader in power electronics industry. The paper puts emphasis on green technology and blackout free electricity. View full abstract»

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  • Simply the best

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 26 - 34
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    Support. Mentoring. Career advancement. These are just a few of the benefits you may reap when you have a strong women's network in place at the company at which you work. If you are fortunate to work at such a company, you can enjoy a number of personal and professional benefits designed to offer support and professional growth. IEEE Women in Engineering Magazine received over 150 nominations and narrowed the field to the top ten "Best Companies for Women to Work." Applications were judged by a panel of national experts in workforce diversity as well as engineering and science leaders from various science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines. Here are the ten leading the pack in providing women with flexibility and the resources to achieve success in engineering: View full abstract»

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  • Power up your teams [Career Advisor]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 35 - 36
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    Scientific evidence and notes from the field concur. Women have superior team-building skills. Men may talk a good game. Women actually do the things that men talk and write about and excel at the relationship-building work of team building. The most important aspect of team building is relationship building, and who knows more about that, men or women? So if you think the team meetings you attend are a time drain, that some people are talking more than their fair share while others barely speak at all, you're not crazy. You're absolutely on target. According to neuropsychiatrist Louann Brizendine in her book The Female Brain, females demonstrate a preference for communication and collaboration from the time they are two- to three-years old. "Typical nontestosteronized girls are very invested in preserving harmonious relationships. From their earliest days, they live most comfortably and happily in the realm of peaceful interpersonal connections. They prefer to avoid conflict because discord puts them at odds with their urge to stay connected, to gain approval and nurture. View full abstract»

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  • Becoming leaders [Career Advisor]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 36 - 38
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    It is no secret that women engineers, or adolescent girls with skills in math, science, and technology who are on their way to becoming engineers, are talented. They work hard, and they're smart. But they must also work smart. This is the main declaration in Becoming Leaders: A Practical Handbook for Women in Engineering, Science, and Technology, a new guidebook by F. Mary Williams and Carolyn J. Emerson. View full abstract»

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  • The calm after the storm [Pipelining]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 39 - 40
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    Hurricane Katrina hit on 28 August 2005 and killed almost 2,000 people, displacing thousands more. Those who stayed behind in New Orleans had to work through the pain of watching their loved ones die, their homes sink, and their lives crumble. View full abstract»

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  • Building the dream [Pipelining]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 40 - 42
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    IEEE's core values include service to humanity: leveraging technology and engineering to benefit human welfare and promoting public awareness and understanding of the engineering profession. In support of IEEE's values, on the morning of 15 February 2008, I began my journey to the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Charter School for Science and Technology in New Orleans, Louisiana. The school is the first in the area to reopen since Hurricane Katrina. Major collaborative efforts were initiated between the state, local city officials, parents, and by principal Doris Hicks, who was named Heroes Among Us 2007 by People magazine to expedite the schools reopening. View full abstract»

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  • DUBAL is in her court [WIE from Around the World]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 44 - 45
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    Maryam Mohamed Al-Jallaf's curiosity to explore new fields led to her becoming an engineer. "The engineering field was relatively new and featured few females at that time in this part of the world," she says of the Middle East. "Also, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) was growing rapidly in the industrial sector, and engineering is one of the key areas of expertise for bringing new plans and ideas to bear, thereby participating meaningfully in this remarkable growth." View full abstract»

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  • Outreach exceeding her grasp [WIE from Around the World]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 45
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  • Minority rules [WIE from Around the World]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 45
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  • A woman's intuition [WIE from Around the World]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 45 - 47
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Women in Engineering Magazine is the first magazine to focus on issues facing women who study or work in IEEE’s fields of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Karen Panetta
Tufts University