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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 12 • Date December 2008

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 28
  • Front cover - IEEE Communications Magazine - Front cover

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): c1 - c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 2 - 4
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  • ComSoc's "behind the scenes" professional staff [the president's page]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 6 - 10
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  • Where are we? what comes next [certification corner]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 12
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  • Dr. Hiroshi Inose's pioneering contributions to digital switching systems and his outstanding leadership in informatics

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 13 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (354 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The idea of time slot interchange (TSI), the fundamental concept of implementing time switches in digital switching systems, was first conceived by Dr. Hiroshi Inose, then at the University of Tokyo, Japan, in 1957 while he was a visiting consultant at Bell Telephone Laboratories. The TSI collects each subscriber's pulse code modulation (PCM)-coded voice information to be stored into a small time interval (time slot), and then aligns multiple time slots on a common transmission bus to constitute a repetitive frame. The TSI enables any time slot to be interchanged with another time slot within a frame once the time slots in the frame are buffered in memories. Thus, TSI gives the time switch functionality equivalent to N-input by N-output space switch functionality. He built a prototype digital time-division multiplexing (TDM) electronic switching system called CAMPUS, which is based on the TSI principle, using a magnetostrictive delay line as a memory device. TSI received little attention until the end of the 1960s because memory devices were very costly. However, with the rapid advancement of semiconductor technologies in the 1970s, the TSI scheme became more widespread. TSI was first commercially deployed in 1976 as the time switch of AT&T's no. 4 ESS, the world's first stored-program control time-division switching system. Since then, TSI has been used in almost all digital central office switching systems and digital private branch exchanges (PBXs). Dr. Inose's contributions were not limited to research on such things as switching systems, PCM integrated communications, computer communications, and road traffic control systems; he was also actively involved in a number of Japanese governmental and international activities in the area of communications and information processing technologies. His final work was the establishment of the National Institute of Informatics (NII) in 2000, Japan's sole comprehensive academic institute in the field of informati- - cs that seeks to advance integrated research and development activities in information-related fields. View full abstract»

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  • Fundamental limitations on increasing data rate in wireless systems

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 16 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    There is a continuing quest for increasing the data transmission rate in wireless systems. Cellular mobile radio systems have advanced from second generation digital technology with limited data capability to third generation systems with data transmission rates on the order of a few megabits per second and on to fourth generation systems with goals of even higher data rates. Wireless local area networks (WLANs) based on various versions of IEEE 802.11 standards and known collectively as WiFi, have evolved from having data transmission rates of several megabits per second to hundreds of megabits per second. View full abstract»

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  • Conference calendar

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 18 - 20
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  • New products

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 22
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  • Product spotlights

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 24
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  • Global Communications Newsletter

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 25 - 28
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  • Consumer communications and networking [guest editorial]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 30 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (119 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A technology that is increasingly visible in the consumer communications domain is peer-to-peer (P2P) communications networks. This is due not mainly to illegal downloads or file sharing, but much more to large-scale consumer communications and distributing contents among subscribers. The main advantage of P2P overlay networks over client-server-based systems is that they do not require central server components; and with respect to management and maintenance, P2P systems are self-managing, in that they can cope with nodes leaving and joining even at a high churn rate. Moreover, P2P systems are very scalable and can cope with a large number of nodes. Typically P2P systems operate as an overlay network on top of the IP layer. View full abstract»

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  • UP2P: a peer-to-peer overlay architecture for ubiquitous communications and networking

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 32 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (222 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Approaches to building an intelligent consumer-friendly network have evolved over time from centralized switch-based to router- and server-based Internet architectures. We propose to drive this evolution further with a new highly scalable architecture that provides features to users derived from the computational and networking capabilities of very large populations of sophisticated terminals. This architecture relies on emerging peer-to-peer overlay technology. We describe a peer-to-peer overlay design that addresses requirements crucial for consumer applications, including overlay federation, peer heterogeneity, peer mobility, and service discovery. In addition, we introduce the concept of an overlay operator and describe the requirements for managed overlays. We have designed and implemented both a middleware and a peer-topeer platform that illustrates these concepts. View full abstract»

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  • Scalable peer-to-peer streaming for live entertainment content

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 40 - 46
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (417 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a system for streaming live entertainment content over the Internet originating from a single source to a scalable number of consumers without resorting to centralized or provider-provisioned resources. The system creates a peer-to-peer overlay network, which attempts to optimize use of existing capacity to ensure quality of service, delivering low startup delay and lag in playout of the live content. There are three main aspects of our solution: first, a swarming mechanism that constructs an overlay topology for minimizing propagation delays from the source to end consumers; second, a distributed overlay anycast system that uses a location-based search algorithm for peers to quickly find the closest peers in a given stream; and finally, a novel incentive mechanism that encourages peers to donate capacity even when the user is not actively consuming content. View full abstract»

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  • Analysis of a large-scale VOD architecture for broadband operators: a P2P-based solution

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 47 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (13)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (739 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    VOD services distribution is gaining unprecedented interest from the consumer communication industry due to its growing success in both the Internet and residential broadband market. In this article we present a scalable VOD distribution architecture for broadband operators. The solution is based on a P2P streaming concept in which a VOD streaming session requested by a given STB is actually provisioned via a multisource streaming session. This solution has the advantage of scaling naturally with the number of STBs in the network. In this article we focus on efficiently translating the popularity distribution into content availability in the network. Different aspects related to this issue are analyzed and challenges highlighted. View full abstract»

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  • An on-demand TV service architecture for networked home appliances

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 56 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (146 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The recent advent of networked home appliances has enabled enhanced on-demand multimedia services to be feasible. Especially, personal video recorders have made it more convenient to manage broadcast TV programs at home by storing them on their own disks. However, standalone PVRs have limitations on availability of TV programs due to limited reception channel and storage capacity. Networked PVR services can get over these limitations by storing all broadcast TV programs in remote storage systems that servers provide. Thus, these networked PVR services can have several advantages over standalone PVRs in terms of cost and availability. In this article we therefore propose an on-demand TV service architecture for networked PVRs to reduce response times to interactive operations and save network bandwidth. Finally, we show from simulation results that our proposed architecture both decreases the number of programs whose initial time-shifting operations are delayed and increases the hit ratio in cache servers significantly. View full abstract»

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  • Outsourcing automated QoS control of home routers for a better online game experience

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 64 - 70
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (98 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Consumer network access links can become bottlenecks when faced with heterogeneous network traffic where real-time traffic from network games finds itself competing with nongame traffic for access to bandwidth. We would like to prioritize network game traffic over these bandwidth restricted links. However, the limited resources of consumer access devices make this problematic. We propose a solution whereby the classification of flows is outsourced to an ISP-based system. The access device is then notified of flow classifications and can apply a simple flow prioritization rule. We have developed a prototype of this system and found it viable in terms of functionality, timeliness of classification, and scalability. View full abstract»

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  • A 60 GHz wireless network for enabling uncompressed video communication

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 71 - 78
    Cited by:  Papers (47)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (481 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Uncompressed high-definition video streaming over wireless personal area networks is a challenging problem because of the high data rate requirement and channel variations. With the advances in RF technology and the huge bandwidth available worldwide in the 57-66 GHz millimeter-wave unlicensed spectrum, mmWave WPANs that can support multigigabit transmission are being developed. However, compared to low-frequency signals (2.4 or 5 GHz), mmWave signals are more fragile; indeed, the propagation losses are significantly higher. In this article we present an mmWave system for supporting uncompressed HD video up to 3 Gb/s. The system includes various efficient error protection and concealment schemes that exploit unequal error resilience properties of uncompressed video. Some of them have been adopted in the emerging 60 GHz WPAN standards such as WirelessHD, ECMA TC48, and IEEE 802.15.3c. Simulations using real uncompressed HD images indicate that the proposed mmWave system can maintain, under poor channel conditions, good average peak-signal-to-noise-ratio and low video quality metric scores. View full abstract»

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  • HomeMesh: a low-cost indoor wireless mesh for home networking

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 79 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (212 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Wi-Fi access technology has become popular in recent years. Many users nowadays use Wi-Fi to gain wireless access to the Internet from offices, public libraries, shopping malls, homes, and other places. However, current Wi-Fi deployment is limited to areas where wired LAN is available. Due to its relatively short transmission range in indoor environments (typically several tens of meters), Wi-Fi coverage needs to be extended significantly to full coverage of a certain area. The wireless mesh network (WMN) is a practical and effective solution. In this article we present HomeMesh, an off-the-shelf, simple, and cost-effective WMN for the indoor home environment. HomeMesh is based on simple protocols, implementable in normal notebooks or PCs, and is compatible with existing Wi-Fi APs and clients (i.e., no AP and client modifications). To achieve better end-to-end delay and throughput, HomeMesh dynamically selects its access path based on the ETX metric. We have implemented HomeMesh and conducted proofof- concept experiments in an indoor environment. Our mesh solution is shown to be effective in improving Wi-Fi services. View full abstract»

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  • User-provided networks: consumer as provider

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 86 - 91
    Cited by:  Papers (13)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (100 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article describes and characterizes an emerging type of user-centric wireless network model, here named a user-provided network, where the end user is at the same time a consumer and a provider of Internet access. A discussion of challenges these new models face is also provided. View full abstract»

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  • Topics in ad hoc and sensor networks [guest editorial]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 92
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (101 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Series on Ad Hoc and Sensor Networks of IEEE Communications Magazine started an interesting debate on research methodologies and approaches in the April 2007 issue. Theoretical research and simulation studies are fundamental for understanding the behavior of phenomena, and their relevance is even higher in such areas as wireless and mobile networking, where experimentation is not easy to realize. However, there is a need to conduct these studies in a very solid convincing way. In the past issue we discussed the importance of considering realistic scenarios, since otherwise the results may lead to conclusions that will not be confirmed in real experiments. In this issue we continue this discussion by presenting other related aspects, such as the role of information theory and simulation, as well as the introduction of novel approaches such as knowledge exploitation to coordinate mobile and wireless networks. View full abstract»

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  • Rethinking information theory for mobile ad hoc networks

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 94 - 101
    Cited by:  Papers (60)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (109 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The subject of this article is the long standing open problem of developing a general capacity theory for wireless networks, particularly a theory capable of describing the fundamental performance limits of mobile ad hoc networks. A MANET is a peer-to-peer network with no preexisting infrastructure. MANETs are the most general wireless networks, with single-hop, relay, interference, mesh, and star networks comprising special cases. The lack of a MANET capacity theory has stunted the development and commercialization of many types of wireless networks, including emergency, military, sensor, and community mesh networks. Information theory, which has been vital for links and centralized networks, has not been successfully applied to decentralized wireless networks. Even if this was accomplished, for such a theory to truly characterize the limits of deployed MANETs it must overcome three key roadblocks. First, most current capacity results rely on the allowance of unbounded delay and reliability. Second, spatial and timescale decompositions have not yet been developed for optimally modeling the spatial and temporal dynamics of wireless networks. Third, a useful network capacity theory must integrate rather than ignore the important role of overhead messaging and feedback. This article describes some of the shifts in thinking that may be needed to overcome these roadblocks and develop a more general theory. View full abstract»

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  • Simulations in wireless sensor and ad hoc networks: matching and advancing models, metrics, and solutions

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 102 - 107
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (88 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The objective of this article is to give advice for carrying out a proper and effective simulation activity for protocol design. It challenges some of the existing criticisms of simulation practices that emphasized validation aspects. This article advocates the use of simple models, matching assumptions and metrics in the problem statement and simulation to provide a basic "proof of concept," and comparison with truly competing solutions, which is possible only after a thorough and critical literature review. Then the complexity of the models can be increased (one parameter at a time), revising the algorithms themselves by adapting them to new assumptions, metrics, and the corresponding simulation environment. Selected independent variables should explain performance under a wide range of scenarios. View full abstract»

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  • Qualitative assessment of approaches to coordinate activities of mobile hosts in ad hoc networks

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 108 - 111
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article deals with the validation of approaches to coordinating activities in mobile ad hoc networks. Previous studies relied on simulations that paid little attention to how well these networks perform the tasks for which they can be deployed. Indeed, many authors employed random mobility models, although the hosts rarely move at random in real applications. Here, we assess the main ideas in the coordination literature in the context of extinguishing forest fires, with movements driven by application-level concerns and an eye on overall performance. The results reveal strengths and weaknesses of the most recent trend in coordination, knowledge exploitation. View full abstract»

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  • Wide area ubiquitous network: the network operator's view of a sensor network

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 112 - 120
    Cited by:  Papers (21)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article describes a network concept called the wide area ubiquitous network (WAUN) and its research activities. WAUN is a network for sensors and actuators, and can support low-end wireless terminals, which are expected to be used for new applications. Among the many types of R&D being performed in the WAUN project, this article focuses on the feasibility of its basic feature and target. The basic feature is "wide coverage using very-low-power-consumption terminals," and its specific target is a "5-km cell radius using 10-mW transmission power terminals with a battery life of 10 years." The results of a basic field experiment and a laboratory experiment suggest that the target seems to be feasible using wireless technologies such as diversity reception (with additional future effort to improve the packet error rate for use in business districts) and LSI technologies such as a power switch fabricated in a CMOS/SOI LSI. View full abstract»

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  • Radio communications: components, systems and networks [guest editorial]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 121
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (93 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Radio communications and networks continue to be one of the most exciting areas of science, technology, and business. Innovations continue to provide society with capabilities we could not have dreamed possible just a decade or two ago. The news is replete with examples of the application of new wireless technology, from entertainment (e.g., video clips and games) to unexpected uses such as messages to supporters from political candidates on the campaign trail. Novel technology, enlightened wireless and telecommunication policies, and exciting (and profitable) applications can be expected to continue in a cycle that is highly beneficial to society. In this issue we offer some further ideas that we hope will continue to support this cycle. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Osman Gebizlioglu
Huawei Technologies