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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 10  Part 1 • Date Oct. 2008

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • Front cover - IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine

    Page(s): c1
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  • This Month's Covers ...

    Page(s): c2
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  • Table of contents

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  • In this issue - technically

    Page(s): 2
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    When NASA was created in 1958 one of the elements incorporated into this new agency was the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Huntsville, Alabama'and its subordinate Missile Firing Laboratory (MFL) in Cape Canaveral. Under NASA, the MEL became the Launch Operations Directorate of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, but expanding operations in the build-up to Apollo dictated that it be given the status of a full-fledged center in July, 1962 [1]. The next year it was renamed the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) after the president whose vision transformed its first decade of operation. View full abstract»

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  • Society news & Information - from the editor-in-chief

    Page(s): 3
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  • Launching astronauts: 50 years of electronic checkout and launch systems at the Kennedy Space Center

    Page(s): 4 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4599 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    When NASA was created in 1958 one of the elements incorporated into this new agency was the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Huntsville, Alabama and its subordinate Missile Firing Laboratory (MFL) in Cape Canaveral. Under NASA, the MFL became the Launch Operations Directorate of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, but expanding operations in the build-up to Apollo dictated that it be given the status of a full-fledged center in July, 1962 [1]. The next year it was renamed the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) after the president whose vision transformed its first decade of operation. The ABMA was under the technical leadership of Dr. Wernher von Braun. The MFL was run by his deputy Dr. Kurt Dehus, an electrical engineer whose experience in the field began in the early days of V-2 testing in war-time Germany. In 1952, a group led by Dehus arrived in Cape Canaveral to begin, test launches of the new Redstone missile [2]. During the 1950s, the MFL built several launch complexes and tested the Redstone, Jupiter, and Jupiter C missiles. This small experienced team of engineers and technicians formed the seed from which has grown the KSC team of today. This briefly reviews the evolution, successes, and setbacks of KSC electronic technologies for integration, checkout, and launch of space vehicles and payloads. We show that this very successful technology development was driven by greater vehicle complexity and heavily influenced and constrained by the commercial state-of-the-art in electronics. View full abstract»

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  • Ultraspectral imaging: A new contribution to global virtual presence

    Page(s): 11 - 17
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    A new technology, Ultraspectral Imaging (USI) offers the capability to extend spectral imaging to a level where molecular adsorption or emission line features can be presented in a two-dimensional display. With these capabilities, unambiguous identification and mapping of gaseous constituents or solid material by their spectral features becomes possible. One of the techniques that shows the potential to collect these type of data is a proposed USI-based on a Fourier transform ultraspectral imager operating in the 3 pm to 5 pm and 8 pm to 12 pm bands designed for installation in an aircraft. This proposed instrument will have a 15 degree field of view (FOV), with an instantaneous field of view (IFOY) of 1.0 mrad. The target spectral resolution is better than 1.5 cm/sub -1/over 2000 to 3000 cm/sub -1/and 0.4 cm/sub -1/over 850 to 1250 cm/sub -1/using 512 spectral channels. The device will use a variety of spectral enhancement techniques to achieve this unprecedented spectral resolution. Computer simulations of the optical systems demonstrate subwavenumber resolutions and signal to noise ratios of over 900. View full abstract»

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  • Computer course in the applied theory of Gyros

    Page(s): 18 - 21
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    The fundamental methodical aspects and the gained practical experience of creating and using computer technologies in teaching the applied theory of gyroscopes are considered. Possible contents and the important features of the computer course are presented. The computer course is based on the papers dealing with various kinds of modern gyro sensors presented at the I-XIV International Conference on Integrated Navigating Systems. View full abstract»

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  • Evaluating aircraft pilot - Navigational equipment in flight tests

    Page(s): 22 - 25
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    The specialists at M.M. Gromov Flight Research Institute (FRI) have developed special techniques and facilities to evaluate the aircraft pilot - navigational equipment for conformance to specified requirements. On-board trajectory measurement complex equipment is used for data recording and determination of actual values of trajectory parameters. The parameter values are obtained using the differential mode of the satellite navigation system. The flight test process is monitored at the flight test control center. The use of a test-bench and simulation complex allows reducing the scope and costs of flight tests. Flight test data are transmitted to the specialists for processing via local computer network on the day of flight tests. This covers the description of facilities used for testing pilot - navigational equipment of new aircraft at the M.M. Gromov Flight Research Institute. View full abstract»

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  • Inertial measurement units on micromechanical sensors

    Page(s): 26 - 31
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    This presents a micromechanical gyroscope (MMG), an inertial measurement unit (IMU)based on MMG and an integrated inertial-satellite attitude and navigation system (IANS) developed in CSRI Elektropribor. The evolution and prospects for the development of MMG main components and MMG-based systems is considered. The test results are given. View full abstract»

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  • Product-based security model for smart home appliances

    Page(s): 32 - 41
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    The idea of using existing electronics in smart home appliances and connecting them to the Internet is a new dimension along which technologies continue to grow. In Japan, electronics giants are selling various kinds of smart home appliances and have also joined hands to create standards for linking networked home appliances. While there is a huge potential market for such appliances, both in Japan and around the world, there are serious security challenges that have to be addressed in order to realize their true benefits. Herein, we examine a number of related security incidents that have occurred in Japan and identify existing challenges from technical, social, and practical aspects. We also discuss some countermeasures that can be used to prevent existing and projected security breaches. View full abstract»

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  • Letter to the Editor

    Page(s): 42
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  • The carrier courier - Munich Air Base

    Page(s): 43 - 44
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  • Dual use technologies and applications: A key-topic in a key-agreement

    Page(s): 45
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  • Directory of IEEE-AESS Personnel

    Page(s): 46
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  • IEEE Aerospace & Electronic Systems Society Organization

    Page(s): 47
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  • 2008 IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society - Membership application

    Page(s): 48
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  • AESS Meetings & Conferences

    Page(s): c3
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  • [Back cover]

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
SenTech, LLC - A DSCI Company
12601 Research Parkway
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 207-1900 ext: 2102
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tpace@sentech.dsci.com