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Physical Science, Measurement and Instrumentation, Management and Education - Reviews, IEE Proceedings A

Issue 6 • Date June 1987

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • IEE reviews

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  • Electronics in UK agriculture and horticulture

    Page(s): 466 - 492
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    This review traces the developing contribution of electronic instrumentation and control systems to UK agricultural and horticultural production. It covers applications in the livestock, arable and horticultural sectors in turn, taking the important grass crop as part of the arabic sector. These main sections are subdivided by type of livestock, crop or farming operation, as appropriate. The section on livestock deals separately with feeding, weighing, quality assessment and environmental control in poultry, pig, sheep and cattle production. Much of the material on cattle is concerned with developments in dairy parlour automation, including automatic identification of cows. The section on arable crops and grass covers instrumentation and control of tractors and implements generally before dealing separately with planting, spray and fertiliser application, harvesting, crop drying and crop grading and storage. In the section on horticulture, fruit and vegetables are considered separately from protected cropping in greenhouses and mushroom units. Forecasts are made of likely commercial developments in each of the three sectors. A concluding section provides an overall assessment of the present status of electronic monitoring and control equipment in agriculture and horticulture, together with the objectives of research and development in this sphere. View full abstract»

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  • Microwave hyperthermia for cancer therapy

    Page(s): 493 - 522
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    Owing to limitations of conventional therapeutic modalities (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy) a renewed interest in cancer thermotherapy has resulted. Fundamental principles governing tissue absorption, guidelines for applicator selection and design and restrictions of each heating approach are discussed. The paper also focuses on recent innovative techniques utilising multiple applicators to achieve better heating uniformity within the safety and regulations guidelines. Current trends in the field of hyperthermia and future projections in equipment design are also presented. View full abstract»

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  • Active noise control systems

    Page(s): 525 - 546
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    A retrospective review of the development of active noise control systems is presented, arguing that the design of active noise control (ANC) systems should be considered from a control systems point of view. This approach provides a design methodology that accounts for the design parameters of the system which determine its performance, thereby producing an ANC system that reduces the problems associated with, and the limited practical success of, previous techniques. Based on this argument, the fundamental conditions required for cancellation are derived in terms of the power spectral densities of the primary and secondary waves. These conditions are in turn related to the geometry-related (incorporating the acoustic response of the propagation medium) and source-related parameters of the system. From these conditions, the control structures employed in current ANC systems are examined and compared with the reported applications. A method for the design of controllers for use in ANC systems with broadband compact noise sources suitable for implementation on digital signal processing devices is presented. Using this method, experimental results using differing controllers are illustrated and discussed for both synthetic and practical sources. Finally, current developments in ANC systems are summarised and areas for further work are suggested. View full abstract»

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  • Role of electricity in subsea intervention

    Page(s): 547 - 576
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    This paper describes the role of electricity as an enabling technology vital to the accomplishment of tasks underwater, i.e. subsea intervention. The basic methods of subsea intervention, i.e. ambient-pressure and atmospheric diving and the use of remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), are outlined, and the hyperbaric ambient- pressure diving environment described in some detail as this presents particular problems from the point of view of the design and operation of electrical equipment. Background information includes a brief history of the use of electricity underwater. The paper covers subsea electrical technology in general and also in relation to specific applications. General considerations include atmospheric and pressure-balanced enclosure of equipment, pressure-tolerant electronic (PTE) systems, power supplies, cables and connectors and electric safety. In the context of electric safety, the recent code of practice for the safe use of electricity underwater is summarised. Specific applications of electricity described include communications, navigation, sonar systems, underwater television and acoustic imaging, nondestructive testing (NDT), electric welding, diver heating and environmental monitoring. The consequences of, and limitations imposed by, the physical properties of water are discussed in appropriate context throughout the paper. View full abstract»

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