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Annals of the History of Computing

Issue 3 • Date July-Sept. 1984

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  • About this issue

    Page(s): 227 - 228
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  • A Note on Our Fifth Anniversary

    Page(s): 228
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  • Advent of Electronic Digital Computing

    Page(s): 229 - 282
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    The author touches on the nebulous beginnings of his interest in computing, and how, when specific problems arose, the computers of the day were used and analyzed. The first choice he made was between analog and digital computers. After study, digital computers seemed better for most purposes, but no computer in existence met his requirements. Thus he was led to a more exact study of the logic of digital computing: medium for the computer structure, base of the numbers for the computer, slow and fast memory, computing by logic and not by enumeration, data in and data out, carry-over, etc. A prototype and an ABC were constructed. Several basic concepts developed in that day are in use in modern computers. The subsequent litigations and controversies are discussed in some detail. View full abstract»

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  • The Discovery of Linear Programming

    Page(s): 283 - 295
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    Around 1940, linear programming was an idea whose time had come. Accordingly, it was discovered three times, independently, between 1939 and 1947, but each time in a somewhat different form dictated by the special circumstances of that discovery. The first discovery was by L. V. Kantorovich, a Soviet citizen, the second was by T. C. Koopmans, Dutch, and the third by G. B. Dantzig, American. The third discovery turned out to be the most general and convenient form, and led to the theory of linear programming as we know it today. View full abstract»

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  • History of Mathematical Programming Systems

    Page(s): 296 - 312
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    The systematic development of practical computing methods for linear programming (LP) began in 1952 at the Rand Corporation in Santa Monica, under the direction of George B. Dantzig. The author worked intensively on this project there until late 1956, by which time great progress had been made on first-generation computers. The work continued at CEIR, Inc., in Washington for some years and later in many places by many individuals and firms. By the late 1960s, elaborate systems of programs known as mathematical programming systems (MPS) had become a standard part of the available software for a number of computers, notably the IBM 360, GE 635, CDC 6600, and Univac 1108. The major MPSs underwent significant updating and extension during the mid-1970s taking on their present and probably final form, at least for big mainframes. Work still continues, however, and substantial improvements are being made in speed, reliability, supporting data management and control systems, and application techniques. Development of quite powerful microcomputer systems is now underway. View full abstract»

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  • Meetings in Retrospect

    Page(s): 313 - 315
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  • Self-Study Questions & Answers

    Page(s): 316
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  • News and Notices

    Page(s): 316
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  • Anecdotes

    Page(s): 317
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  • Reviews

    Page(s): 319 - 325
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Aims & Scope

From the analytical engine to the supercomputer, from Pascal to von Neumann, from punched cards to CD-ROMs -- Annals of the History of Computing covers the breadth of computer history.

 

This Periodical ceased publication in 1991. The current retitled publication is IEEE Annals of the History of Computing.

Full Aims & Scope