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Annals of the History of Computing

Issue 1 • Date Jan.-March 1991

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • About this issue

    Page(s): 1 - 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Factory Concepts and Practices in Software Development

    Page(s): 3 - 32
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    This paper reviews the introduction of factory concepts and practices, based on tools and methods from the evolving field of software engineering, at major software producers, in particular those that explicitly adopted the factory label to describe their software facilities or approach to software development: Hitachi, Toshiba, NEC, and Fujitsu in Japan, as well as System Development Corporation in the United States. The other United States firm discussed in detail is International Business Machines, which, without adopting the factory label, introduced numerous measures to organize and control software development, especially basic software. The paper emphasizes that the difficulty of the technology, shortages of skilled engineers, and large-scale projects have encouraged producers to become more systematic or factory-like in managing a series of projects, even though some characteristics of the technology and the industry have made software seem difficult to control and more suitable to a loosely structured project-centered or craft approach to development. View full abstract»

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  • Some Approaches to, and Illustrations of, Programming Language History

    Page(s): 33 - 50
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    This paper describes some factors in, approaches to, and specific elements of, programming language history. It first lists a number of general factors and approaches which can be used to discuss the history of programming languages. After presenting a life cycle for programming language development, it provides numerous illustrations of programming language history and chronology from many of the viewpoints indicated earlier. There is a brief discussion of relevant literature and a section indicating some of the reasons for the vast proliferation of programming languages. Various charts and lists are included. This paper should be viewed as one approach to considering the history of programming languages, rather than as a history of programming languages per se. View full abstract»

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  • Guidelines for the Documentation of Segments of the History of Computing

    Page(s): 51 - 62
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    Requirement specifications for the guidance of researchers in collecting and recording the history of computing have been sought by many persons during our 12 year history as a journal. While there does not exist a definitive outline which covers all aspects of the field, the set of guidelines created for the first History of Programming Languages Conference in 1976 have been used by many researchers, authors, and editors. This set of questions, primarily targeted toward those who were involved in the very history which they are recording and reporting on, has been revised and expanded by the program committee of the proposed second History of Programming Languages Conference, scheduled for 1993. View full abstract»

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  • Marks on Paper: Part 1. A Historical Survey of Computer Output Printing

    Page(s): 63 - 79
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    The evolution and history of computer printing technology in the United States is covered from the end of World War II to recent times (1946-1987). The wide variety of printer products introduced over the forty-year period is surveyed and their differentiating characteristics described. The relationship of computer technology to printer technology is discussed as is the relationship of the computer industry to the printer industry. View full abstract»

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  • Happenings

    Page(s): 81 - 88
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  • Self-Study Questions & Answers

    Page(s): 88 - 90
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  • Anecdotes

    Page(s): 91 - 100
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  • Biographies

    Page(s): 100 - 111
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  • Reviews

    Page(s): 111 - 117
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Aims & Scope

From the analytical engine to the supercomputer, from Pascal to von Neumann, from punched cards to CD-ROMs -- Annals of the History of Computing covers the breadth of computer history.

 

This Periodical ceased publication in 1991. The current retitled publication is IEEE Annals of the History of Computing.

Full Aims & Scope