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Nanobiotechnology, IET

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 2008

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  • Nanoelectronic interface for lab-on-a-chip devices

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 55 - 61
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (370 KB)  

    Innovations in microfabricated analytical devices integrated with microelectronic circuits and biological cells show promising results in detection, diagnosis and analysis. Planar metallic microelectrodes are widely used for the electrical interface with the biological cells. Issues with the current microelectrode array design are the difficulty in selective integration with a cell, the size dependency of its impedance and the large amount of noise in the circuit due to this mismatch. It is quite evident that an approach utilising nanotechnology can solve some of these problems by yielding efficient electrical interconnections. The design and development of a planar microelectrode array integrated with vertically aligned nanowires for lab-on-a- chip (LoC) device applications are presented. The nanowire integrated microelectrode arrays for LoC devices show promising results with respect to impedance control due to increased surface area. The authors have fabricated nanowire integrated microelectrode arrays on silicon and flexible polymer substrates using the template method. A high degree of specific growth is achieved by controlling the nanowire synthesis parameters. An attempt has been made to integrate biological cells into the nanowires by culturing endothelial cells onto the microelectrode array. View full abstract»

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  • Polarisation and membrane voltage of ellipsoidal particle with a constant membrane thickness: a series expansion approach

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 62 - 71
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (607 KB)  

    The estimation of the membrane voltage and the polarisation factor of biological cells provide a base for the study of bio-manipulation techniques, such as dielectrophoresis, electroporation or electrofusion. To model a biological cell, an ellipsoidal particle with an insulating membrane is sometimes employed, but due to the limitation of the confocal nature of the coordinate system, the membrane thickness is assumed to vary with the position, despite the fact that the lipid bilayer membrane has a uniform thickness. The authors present a method to rigorously treat the uniform-thickness condition in a system having an axial symmetry. The method is based on the harmonic expansion of the field, to include the condition of the uniform- membrane thickness as a series expansion of the geometrical factor, and to solve the field problem as an interaction of the harmonic components. The conventional variable thickness model has been identified as being equivalent to neglecting the harmonic interactions in the uniform-thickness model. Numerical calculations are done of the membrane voltage and the polarisation factor, and it has been found that the discrepancy between the proposed rigorous model and the conventional variable thickness model becomes significant when field deformation is large due to the high axial ratio of the ellipsoid. View full abstract»

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  • Implementation of wireless power transfer and communications for an implantable ocular drug delivery system

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 72 - 79
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (274 KB)  

    A wireless power transfer and communication system based on near-field inductive coupling has been designed and implemented. The feasibility of using such a system to remotely control drug release from an implantable drug delivery system is addressed. The architecture of the wireless system is described and the signal attenuation over distance in both water and phosphate buffered saline is studied. Additionally, the health risk due to exposure to radio frequency (RF) radiation is examined using a biological model. The experimental results demonstrate that the system can trigger the release of drug within 5 s, and that such short exposure to RF radiation does not produce any significant ( les1degC) heating in the biological model. The conclusion of the work is that this system could replace a chemical battery in an implantable system, eliminating the risks associated with battery failure and leakage and also allowing more compact designs for applications such as drug delivery. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IET Nanobiotechnology covers all aspects of research and emerging technologies including fundamental theories and concepts applied to biomedical-related devices and methods at the micro- and nano-scale.

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