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Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics, IEEE Journal of

Issue 4 • Date July-aug. 2008

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 40
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): C1 - C4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics publication information

    Page(s): C2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Introduction to the Special Issue on Semiconductor Photonic Materials

    Page(s): 977 - 978
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (84 KB)  

    The 32 papers in this special issue introduce the latest developments in the field of semiconductor photonic materials, processing, structures, and characterization. View full abstract»

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  • MOCVD-Grown Dilute Nitride Type II Quantum Wells

    Page(s): 979 - 991
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1076 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Dilute nitride Ga(In)NAs/GaAsSb ldquoWrdquo type II quantum wells on GaAs substrates have been grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Design studies underscore the importance of nitrogen incorporation to extend the emission wavelength into the 1.5 mum region as well as increase the electron confinement, given the material strain relaxation limitations. These studies also indicate that the Sb content of the GaAs1-xSbx hole well is required to be greater than x ~ 0.2, to provide adequate hole confinement (i.e., DeltaEnu > 150 meV). Photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) studies are used to characterize the optical transitions and compare with a ten-band bm k.p simulation. We find that the lowest energy type II transition observed is in good agreement with theory. Preliminary results are presented on diode lasers with two- and three-stage ldquoWrdquo-active regions that exhibit emission that is blue-shifted from the PL, due to charge separation and carrier band-filling of higher energy transitions. Further structure optimization, including multiple-stage (eight to ten W-stages) active regions is required to lower the threshold carrier density and minimize carrier band-filling and built-in electric field effects resulting from charge separation. Dilute nitride materials, such as GaAs1- y-z Sby Nz /InP, are also under development offering potential for wavelength extension into the mid-IR employing InP substrates. View full abstract»

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  • Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxial Growth of InAs/InGaAs Multiple Quantum Well Structures on InP Substrates

    Page(s): 992 - 997
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (475 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Device quality InAs/InGaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) structures were grown on InP substrates by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) and applied to lasers emitting at wavelengths longer than 2 mum. InAs/InGaAs MQWs with flat interfaces were obtained by adjusting the growth temperature between 460 degC and 510 degC. The photoluminescence peak wavelength of the MQWs increases from 1.93 to 2.47 mum as the thickness of InAs quantum wells increases from 2 to 7 nm. The structural and optical properties remained almost unchanged even after annealing at 620 degC. For 40-mu m-wide stripe broad-area lasers with 5-nm-thick InAs quantum wells, a lasing wavelength longer than 2.3 mum and an output power higher than 10 mW were achieved under continuous-wave operation at a temperature of 25 degC. These results indicate that InAs/InGaAs MQW structures grown by MOVPE are very useful for the active region of 2 mum wavelength lasers. View full abstract»

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  • Material Considerations for Avalanche Photodiodes

    Page(s): 998 - 1009
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (755 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are widely used to detect and amplify weak optical signals by utilizing the impact ionization process. The choice of material is critical for the detection of a particular wavelength, and it is often expedient to use a combination of different materials to optimize the overall device performance. The APDs are now capable of covering a wide spectrum from the infrared down to the ultraviolet wavelengths. This paper will review the material requirements to achieve high gain with low excess noise at the different wavelength regions. View full abstract»

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  • Injection and Avalanche Electroluminescence of \hbox {Al}_{\hbox {0.1}} \hbox {Ga}_{\hbox {0.9}} \hbox {N/Al}_{\hbox {0.15}} \hbox {Ga}_{\hbox {0.85}} \hbox {N} Multiple Quantum Wells

    Page(s): 1010 - 1013
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (175 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Three periods of Al0.1Ga0.9N/Al0.15Ga0.85 N multiple quantum wells (MQWs) were used as the active region of a p-i-n diode fabricated on 6H-SiC substrate. Electroluminescence (EL) of these MQWs has been investigated in both injection and avalanche modes. Band-to-band luminescence of the Al0.1Ga0.9N wells was found to peak at 364 nm in the injection mode and in the range of 364-372 nm in the avalanche mode. The most striking phenomenon is that band-to-band EL of the Al0.15Ga0.85N barriers has also been observed in the injection mode, while it is not seen in the avalanche mode. This is explained by considering different sources of carriers and different carrier transportation mechanisms in the two modes. The luminescence intensity I EL has a power-law dependence on the current I by I EL prop I 2 in the injection mode and by I EL prop I 4 in the avalanche mode. View full abstract»

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  • Fabrication and Characterization of GaSb-Based Monolithic Resonant-Cavity Light-Emitting Diodes Emitting Around 2.3 μm and Including a Tunnel Junction

    Page(s): 1014 - 1021
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (693 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, the process of fabrication of GaSb-based electrically injected resonant-cavity LEDs near 2.3 mum is detailed. The electrical and optical properties of these diodes operating in continuous wave at room temperature are also presented. The different tested monolithic structures have similar designs with two doped AlAsSb/GaSb Bragg mirrors and an active region with eight GaInAsSb quantum wells. Performances of devices containing or not an n++-InAsSb/p++-GaSb tunnel junction (TJ) can be compared. The large improvements of electrical resistance as well as output power, observed when a TJ is included, demonstrate all the advantages to use such a technology for the realization of electrically injected vertical cavity structures emitting in the mid-IR on GaSb substrate. View full abstract»

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  • Tabletop Resonant Infrared Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation of Light-Emitting Organic Thin Films

    Page(s): 1022 - 1030
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (764 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Structural optimization of light-emitting polymer, or organic semiconductor, thin films deposited by tabletop 2.9 mum resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) is investigated. Surface morphology of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-(1-cyanovinylene) phenylene] (MEH-CN-PPV) and poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) films are analyzed using optical and atomic force microscopy. These films are deposited using different target-to-substrate distances, ambient base pressures, laser fluences, and substrate temperatures, and with different target compositions comprising tetrahydrofuran (THF), chlorobenzene, toluene, o -xylene, chloroform, phenol:THF, and phenol:water. The corresponding optical behavior and chemical structure of the deposited films is investigated with photoluminescence spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The use of a novel RIR-MAPLE emulsion target recipe enables the successful incorporation of MEH-CN-PPV and MEH-PPV polymers into ice matrices, and an MEH-PPV thin film with near-featureless surface morphology and an unprecedented rms surface roughness of 0.292 nm is demonstrated. View full abstract»

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  • Materials and Processes for MEMS-Based Infrared Microspectrometer Integrated on HgCdTe Detector

    Page(s): 1031 - 1041
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (766 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The materials and processes for fabrication of monolithically integrated microelectromechanical systems-based microspectrometers operating in the short-wavelength IR range is presented. Using low-temperature surface micromachining techniques, compatible with a range of IR sensor technologies, silicon-nitride-based tunable Fabry-Perot filter structures with distributed Bragg mirrors made of Ge/SiO/Ge layers have been monolithically integrated with HgCdTe photoconductors. The stress within and between the many layers of the structure has been eliminated or compensated by stress tuning of the deposition conditions. The demonstrated microspectrometers have a tuning range of 1.8-2.2 mum with relative peak transmission of 70% and full-width at half-maximum of 80plusmn10 nm. View full abstract»

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  • Interband and Intersubband Optical Properties of Doped n- \hbox {Zn}_{\bf 0.46}\hbox {Cd}_{\bf 0.54}\hbox {Se/Zn}_{\bf 0.24}\hbox {Cd}_{\bf 0.25}\hbox {Mg}_{\bf 0.51}\hbox {Se} Multiple Quantum Wells for Intersubband Device Applications

    Page(s): 1042 - 1047
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    Two heavily doped n-type Zn0.46Cd0.54Se/Zn0.24 Cd0.25Mg0.51Se multiple quantum well (MQW) structures have been grown on InP (0 0 1) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were performed to characterize their interband and intersubband (ISB) properties. These two MQW samples have similar structures except for different well widths and a different number of periods. Excitation-intensity-dependent PL shows no electronic coupling between the multiquantum wells. The integrated PL intensities and the PL decay times of the MQWs were measured as functions of temperature in the range from 77 to 290 K. Theoretical fittings of temperature dependences of integrated PL intensities and PL decay times indicate that the nonradiative recombination processes observed in our samples can be well described by hole capture by acceptor-like defect centers through multiphonon emissions. ISB absorption spectra of the samples were measured by FTIR and show peak absorption at wavelengths of 3.99 and 5.35 mum for the MQWs with well widths of 28 and 42 A, respectively. Theoretical calculations based on the envelope function approximation confirm that these peaks are due to the transitions from the ground state E1 to the first excited state E2. View full abstract»

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  • Materials and Process Development for ZnMgO/ZnO Light-Emitting Diodes

    Page(s): 1048 - 1052
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (418 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We report on the fabrication of UV LEDs based on a p-n junction p-ZnMgO/n-ZnO/n-ZnMgO double heterostructure. Pulsed-laser deposition was used to grow the complete heterostructure on c -plane sapphire templates. The LEDs were patterned by simple wet etching. Band-edge electroluminescence emission most likely associated with ZnO excitonic transitions was observed at room temperature. However, the devices show sensitivity to the presence of hydrogen in the measurement ambient due to formation of a surface conduction layer. The results show the potential of ZnO-based materials for UV emitters of potentially lower cost and with comparable or higher emission intensity than AlGaN/GaN devices provided adequate surface passivation techniques are developed. View full abstract»

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  • Low-Threshold Stimulated Emission in ZnO Thin Films Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Page(s): 1053 - 1057
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (148 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this study, high-quality ZnO thin films were grown on sapphire substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD), followed by high-temperature postdeposition annealing. A thin Al2O3 layer was subsequently deposited by ALD on the ZnO surface to reduce detrimental surface states. Photoluminescence measurements conducted in a backscattering configuration at room temperature show that the ZnO film exhibited stimulated emission with a low threshold intensity of 35.1 kW/ cm2. This may be attributed to the high-quality ZnO film and Al2O3 surface passivation layer grown by ALD, as well as the Al doping effect caused by the thermal diffusion of Al from the sapphire into the ZnO. Results show that ZnO films grown by the ALD technique are applicable to next-generation short-wavelength photonic devices. View full abstract»

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  • Optical and Electrical Characteristics of ZnO Films Grown on Nitridated Si (1 0 0) Substrate with GaN and ZnO Double Buffer Layers

    Page(s): 1058 - 1063
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The optical and electrical characteristics of zinc oxide (ZnO) films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) on Si substrates were investigated. ZnO epitaxial layer was successfully grown on nitridated Si(100) substrate initially covered with high-temperature GaN and low-temperature ZnO double buffer layers using MBE. X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence results both indicated that a reasonable quality of ZnO epitaxial layer was obtained. As the CV measurement had indicated, the carrier concentration was reduced virtually in a linear fashion from ZnO surface down to GaN buffer layer. A reduction in electron concentration was caused by the carrier depletion due to the presence of the Schottky barrier of Ni/ZnO. The large density of electron accumulated at the ZnO/GaN interface was due to the large conduction band discontinuity and offset. View full abstract»

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  • Templating and Replication of Spiral Photonic Crystals for Silicon Photonics

    Page(s): 1064 - 1073
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    This paper describes femtosecond laser lithography of 3-D photonic crystal templates in commercial photoresist SU-8 and replication of these templates with silicon. Using this approach, silicon-based photonic crystals having 3-D square spiral architecture and exhibiting photonic stop gaps near the 2.5- mum wavelength were fabricated. Possibilities to use a multiple-beam interference technique for two-photon absorption templating of photonic crystals are explored. View full abstract»

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  • Bandgap Tuning of Silicon Micromachined 1-D Photonic Crystals by Thermal Oxidation

    Page(s): 1074 - 1081
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (845 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Fabrication and optical testing of high-aspect-ratio 1D photonic crystals, obtained by electrochemical micromachining of silicon, are discussed in this paper. The devices consist of high-aspect-ratio periodic (P=4 mum) arrays of 1.22-mum-thick silicon walls separated by 2.78-mum-wide air gaps, with 100 mum etching depth. They were designed as hybrid quarter-wavelength reflectors with photonic bandgaps in the near-IR region, one in particular centered at lambda=1.55 mum. The fabrication process was improved to increase structure uniformity and strength. Thermal oxidation of the silicon structures was exploited to tune the wavelength position and width of the bandgaps. Fabricated devices, also with different silicon dioxide thicknesses, were optically tested by measuring their spectral reflectivity in the wavelength range of 1.0-1.7 mum. Experimental results were found in good agreement with the calculated spectra. View full abstract»

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  • Material Properties of Si-Ge/Ge Quantum Wells

    Page(s): 1082 - 1089
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (470 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Germanium (Ge) and silicon-germanium (Si-Ge) have the potential to integrate optics with Si IC technology. The quantum-confined Stark effect, a strong electroabsorption mechanism often observed in III-V quantum wells (QWs), has been demonstrated in Si-Ge/Ge QWs, allowing optoelectronic modulators in such group IV materials. Here, based on photocurrent electroabsorption experiments on different samples and fitting of the resulting allowed and nominally forbidden transitions, we propose more accurate values for key parameters such as effective masses and band offsets that are required for device design. Tunneling resonance modeling including conduction band nonparabolicity was used to fit the results with good consistency between the experiments and the fitted transitions. View full abstract»

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  • Light Emission From Silicon in Photonic Crystal Nanocavity

    Page(s): 1090 - 1097
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (854 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We have introduced a photonic crystal into a single-crystal silicon slab in order to manipulate the light emission. When the lattice constant of a defect-free photonic crystal matches the wavelength of light in the medium, the light emitted from the silicon is resonantly extracted at the photonic band edge within the escape light cone. When the lattice constant is larger than the wavelength, Brillouin zone folding of the photonic band also allows the light to be extracted; we achieved an intensity that was enhanced by a factor of ~ 20 due to the diffraction of internal light into the light cone. We have also created a point defect in photonic crystals with smaller lattice constants that functions as a nanocavity and strongly interacts with the silicon emitter. Four cavity modes were observed, with different Q -factors and emission patterns. The mode orders were assigned using the resonant wavelengths and polarizations. The observed emission at room temperature was enhanced by a factor of ~ 30 in comparison to that of an unprocessed area of silicon-on-insulator. Our study demonstrates that employing a photonic crystal nanocavity in silicon can greatly improve the light extraction efficiency, the characteristics of the radiation pattern, and the internal quantum efficiency. View full abstract»

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  • Dry Etching of Anisotropic Microstructures for Distributed Bragg Reflectors in AlGaInP/GaAs Laser Structures

    Page(s): 1098 - 1103
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (606 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A process for anisotropically etching AlGalnP/GaAs laser structures in a high-temperature (180degC), single-step BCl3/Cl2/Ar plasma process is demonstrated. The etch rate is shown to be stable over the duration of the etch due to its in- sensitivity to temperature. However, this etch process is unsuitable for etching high-aspect-ratio features due to the strong aspect ratio dependence of the GaAs etch rate at 180degC. A two-step etch where the GaAs is etched at 25degC and the AlGalnP layers are etched at 180degC is demonstrated that etches both materials anisotropically. The relative amount of Ar in the plasma has a strong effect on both the sidewall quality and the aspect-ratio-dependent etch rate. Finally, a process to etch anisotropic microstructures with a weak etch rate dependence on aspect ratio is reported. View full abstract»

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  • Comparison of Quantum Well Interdiffusion on Group III, Group V, and Combined Groups III and V Sublattices in GaAs-Based Structures

    Page(s): 1104 - 1112
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (635 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An analytical electron microscope was used for direct measurement of the concentration profiles of In1-xGaxAsyP1- y quantum wells (QWs) and barriers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates. The well and barrier layers had compositional differences on the group III (In/Ga) sublattice only, the group V (As/P) sublattice only, and on both sublattices. These were annealed over a range of temperatures (700-950degC), and the resultant changes in the QW widths and compositional profiles were determined along with the changes in the photoluminescence (PL) emission wavelength. The structures were annealed either uncapped or capped with either a 100-nm-thick layer of low temperature (250degC) grown InGaP (LT-InGaP) or with CVD-grown SiO2. The LT-InGaP layer contains excess phosphorus expected to be present as P-antisite defects. This was used to enhance interdiffusion on the group V sublattice during annealing, producing a blue-shift in PL response. The SiO2 capping leads to outdiffusion of Ga from the top GaAs layer producing additional group III defects that enhance interdiffusion of the group III sublattice. The interdiffusion activation energies and diffusivities were obtained from Arrhenius plots for each of groups III and V QWs profile changes. The compositional profiles of the QW after annealing are used to infer the defects involved in the interdiffusion process on each sublattice. View full abstract»

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  • High-Power Low-Beam Divergence Edge-Emitting Semiconductor Lasers with 1- and 2-D Photonic Bandgap Crystal Waveguide

    Page(s): 1113 - 1122
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (535 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We report on edge-emitting lasers based on the 1- and 2-D longitudinal photonic bandgap crystal concept. The longitudinal photonic bandgap crystal (PBC) design allows a robust and controllable extension of the fundamental mode over a thick multilayer waveguide to obtain a very large vertical mode spot size and a narrow vertical beam divergence. View full abstract»

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  • Manufacturable Photonic Crystal Single-Mode and Fluidic Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    Page(s): 1123 - 1131
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1175 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We describe a robust manufacturing process for single-mode photonic crystal (PhC) vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). Various PhC designs are investigated to determine endlessly single-mode designs, whereby the same PhC design yields single-mode operation for three different wavelengths (780, 850, and 980 nm). The fabrication of the PhC pattern is based on a self-aligned optical lithography process. The fabrication process results in VCSELs with a maximum output power greater than 1 mW under continuous-wave (CW) operation with side-mode suppression ratio greater than 35 dB. We also show microfluidic laser structures that are enabled by our fabrication process, which integrate fluid channels into VCSELs. Optical and electrical properties of these microfluidic VCSELs are investigated with and without fluids present under CW and pulsed operation. A shift of the lasing wavelength is found with fluid insertion. View full abstract»

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  • Physical Mechanism of p-i-n-Diode-Based Photonic Crystal Silicon Electrooptic Modulators for Gigahertz Operation

    Page(s): 1132 - 1139
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (800 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, the physical mechanism governing the optical modulation in a p-i-n-diode-embedded photonic crystal (PC) silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometer modulator is examined. Optical simulations have been performed to study how the slow group velocity of the photonic crystal waveguides enables a significant reduction of device size. The theoretical speed limitation in a PC-based silicon modulator is also explored. The 2-D semiconductor device simulator MEDICI has been employed to analyze the transient behavior of the p-i-n-diode-embedded silicon modulator. Electrical simulations have revealed a significant improvement in modulation speed upon the enhancement of current density in a downscaled PC device. High-speed optical modulation at 1 Gmiddots-1 has been experimentally demonstrated. The performance degradation in optical modulation at the low-frequency operation region attributed to the thermooptic effect is identified and discussed. Simulations have also revealed that the modulation speed of our device can be improved up to 10 GHz by further reducing the device dimensions with little penalty of the increased optical loss. View full abstract»

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  • Lateral Ordering, Position, and Number Control of Self-Organized Quantum Dots: The Key to Future Functional Nanophotonic Devices

    Page(s): 1140 - 1149
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2019 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Lateral ordering, position, and number control of self-organized epitaxial semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are demonstrated. Straight linear InAs QD arrays are formed by self- organized anisotropic strain engineering of an InGaAsP/InP (10 0) superlattice template in chemical beam epitaxy. The QD emission wavelength at room temperature is tuned into the important 1.55 mum telecom wavelength region through the insertion of ultrathin GaAs interlayers. Guided self-organized anisotropic strain engineering is demonstrated on shallow- and deep-patterned GaAs (3 1 1)B substrates by molecular beam epitaxy for the formation of complex InGaAs QD arrays. Lateral positioning and number control of InAs QDs, down to a single QD, are demonstrated on truncated InP (100) pyramids by selective-area metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. Sharp emission around 1.55 mum is observed well above liquid nitrogen temperatures. The regrowth of a passive waveguide structure establishes submicrometer-scale active- passive integration. The demonstrated control over QD formation is the key to future functional nanophotonic devices and paves the way toward the ultimates of photonic-integrated circuits operating at the single and multiple electron and photon level with control of the quantum mechanical and electromagnetic interactions. View full abstract»

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  • Quantum Dots-in-a-Well Focal Plane Arrays

    Page(s): 1150 - 1161
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1564 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, the basics and some of the recent developments in quantum dots-in-a-well (DWELL) focal plane arrays (FPAs) are reviewed. Fundamentally, these detectors represent a hybrid between a conventional quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) and a quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP), in which the active region consists of quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a quantum well (QW). This hybridization grants DWELLs many of the advantages of its components. These advantages include normally incident photon sensitivity without gratings or optocoupers, like QDIPs, and reproducible control over operating wavelength through ldquodial-in recipesrdquo as seen in QWIPs. Recently reported high-temperature operation results for DWELL FPAs now back up the conclusions drawn by the long carrier lifetimes observed in DWELL heterostructures using femtosecond spectroscopy. This paper will conclude with a preview of some upcoming advances in the field of DWELL FPAs. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Papers published in the IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics fall within the broad field of science and technology of quantum electronics of a device, subsystem, or system-oriented nature.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
John Cartledge
Queen's University