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Nanotechnology Magazine, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date March 2008

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Front cover - IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine - Front cover

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): C1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1 - 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • More action than Hollywood and Vine [The Editor's Desk]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 3
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  • Putting E. coli to good use

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 4 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1984 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Flagellar motor is a member of the molecular motor family that provides mechanical power at the cellular level to many living organisms. In this paper, this feature of bacteria is used to power biological nanodevices. The preliminary results indicate that the flagellar motor device is at least as sensitive as existing sensors for explosives, including the conventional electrochemical and the more portable biological-based designs. View full abstract»

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  • The new interface of technology and medicine

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 9 - 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1500 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The fundamental challenges in modern biomedical science often arise from the inherent complexity of the biomolecular systems that serve as the foundations from which sensing and therapeutic platforms are developed to address. Emergent diagnostic and therapeutic platforms for nanoengineered medicine are discussed here. View full abstract»

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  • Detect the dots

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 15 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1181 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents quantum dots (QDds) and its applications in biomolecular analysis and target detection. Applications include QDs as fluorescent labels, QDs in multiplexed detection in biomolecular analysis, QD-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and single-particle fluorescence coincidence detection. Continuous advances in surface chemistry and synthesis processes of QDs have greatly improved the reliability of QDs for biomolecular assaying. A number of QD-based biomolecular technologies have been validated with actual clinical samples. This great progress has shown that QDs are amenable to clinical applications and will accelerate the translation of these new technologies into clinical settings. View full abstract»

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  • Guiding light in nanomedicine

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 19 - 21
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (810 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Laser-guided drug delivery can achieve high spatial resolution compared with electroporation and sonoporation techniques. By tightly focusing ultrafast laser pulses, the cell damage area can be limited to submicron scale, allowing the removal of subcellular organelles or part of a cell membrane for drug delivery into a single cell. This function will play an important role in single-cell analysis. Combining with metallic nanoparticles conjugated with antibodies, a laser beam has been shown to be able to selectively kill tumor cells binding with these nanoparticles. Laser-guided drug delivery and surgery technology is expected to become a powerful tool in the nanomedicine field. View full abstract»

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  • Focusing fluids and light

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 22 - 27
    Cited by:  Patents (2)
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    There exist two major technical challenges when developing on-chip single- particle detection systems: focusing the particles and focusing the light. Flow cytometry is used to measure the optical and fluorescence characteristics of single cells while cells pass through an optical interrogation area (with dimensions on the order of several micrometers to tens of micrometers) that is defined by a focused laser beam. View full abstract»

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  • HUB is where the heart is

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 28 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2062 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCN) is a six-university initiative that was established in 2002 to connect those who develop simulation tools with those who use them. The NCN currently addresses three science themes, nanoelectronics, nano-electrical-mechanical systems (NEMS) and nanofluidics, and nanomedicine, but is expanding its coverage into other areas of nanotechnology. The NCN's strategy to serve and engage the nanotechnology community centers on a unique, science gateway, www.nanoHUB.org, offering online simulation services for research, education, and collaboration and a new way to publish research and instructional materials. The NCN's primary goal is to lower barriers for the use of simulations in emerging fields of study. View full abstract»

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  • The 4th IEEE-NEMS

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): C3
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