By Topic

Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date May-June 2008

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 26
  • Front cover - IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine

    Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1311 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1 - 2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (173 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Focusing on the AIMBE meeting [From the Editor]

    Page(s): 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (67 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Letter to the Editor

    Page(s): 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (726 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A call for cooperation [Society News]

    Page(s): 6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (50 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • MRI-Compatible Robotics

    Page(s): 12 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (209 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The eight articles in this special issue focus on MRI-compatible robotics. The articles are summarized here. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Opportunities and Challenges in MR-Compatible Robotics

    Page(s): 15 - 22
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1159 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article gives an overview of the opportunities offered by a novel technique, the components of MR-compatible robotic systems, the history of MR-compatible robotics, and the main challenges and directions for future developments. Robotic interfaces can dynamically interact with humans performing movements and can be used to study neuromuscular adaptation. A haptic interface that could be used in conjunction with fMRI would enable neuroscientists to view and investigate the brain mechanisms involved in human motor control and related dysfunctions. This could become a critical tool in neuroscience and rehabilitation. It is concluded that with all robotic systems for medical applications, the community needs to demonstrate the ability of such systems in assisting surgeons and augmenting their performance. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Testing MR Safety and Compatibility

    Page(s): 23 - 27
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (425 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Magnetic resonance (MR) safety and compatibility are important issues for all medical implants, surgical tools, and electronic or mechatronic equipment to be used within an MR environment. MR testing of medical devices is required for device approval by regulatory agencies, such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Union (EU) Notified Bodies. Different robotic and manipulator systems have been developed for use with MR imaging (MRI). This article provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of MR safety and compatibility issues and updates the discussion on existing MR testing methods with an overview on medical robotic and manipulator devices. These tests will increase the safety of the patient and provide MR operators and device manufacturers with important information and, thus, broaden the field of interventional MRI. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Actuation Systems for MR Elastography

    Page(s): 28 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1250 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    One main issue with magnetic resonance elastography is the design of an actuation system to enable adequate mechanical excitation within the magnetic field of the magnetic resonance (MR) imager. Pneumatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric actuation systems have been employed for MRE examinations of the skeletal muscle, the brain, the breast, and abdominal organs. Although pneumatic systems are restricted to lower frequencies roughly below 100 Hz and electromagnetic actuators can interfere with magnetic imaging gradients, piezoelectric systems provide highly stable and precise actuation for a frequency range up to 500 Hz with amplitudes up to 1 mm. The design of a piezoelectric actuator allowing such a broad range of excitation will be presented. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Modular Approach to MRI-Compatible Robotics

    Page(s): 35 - 41
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (618 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The objective of the research described in this article is to create individual MR-compatible modules consisting of 1-DoF stages complete with actuators and position encoders for implementation of the closed-loop position control. These modules can connect together to form multi-DoF assemblies that can be located inside the scanner bore near to the patient anatomy that requires the intervention. This avoids the problems associated with remote actuation and transmission mechanisms, considerably reducing the size of the manipulator. As most robots consist of kinematic chains of 1-DoF stages, these modules would be suitable for a wide range of interventions, and their design can be optimized for the procedure for which they are applied to. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Light Puncture Robot for CT and MRI Interventions

    Page(s): 42 - 50
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1272 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The new robot named light puncture robot (LPR), has an original compact body-supported architecture, which is naturally able to follow the patient's body surface respiratory movements for abdominal and thoracic percutaneous procedures, which is compatible with CT, open MRI, and closed MRI. It is entirely made of plastic and uses MR-compatible pneumatic actuators powered by compressed air. It is localized via an image-based control using a localization device that is totally integrated to the robot. The physician is also included in the control loop, since he/she selects the target and the entry point and supervises the whole process. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A General-Purpose MR-Compatible Robotic System

    Page(s): 51 - 58
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1546 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The development of a general-purpose robotic system at the Washington University for performing minimally invasive interventions with real-time MR guidance is reviewed. In this paper, the criteria upon which the system was based, and an overview of its components, the design, and prototyping of the robotic manipulator, its control components and their general integration and logic is presented. The human-machine interface and the practice of performing MR-guided interventions are described. It is concluded that when looking into the cost-effectiveness of MR-compatible systems, one cannot ignore the fact that MRI is among the most expensive imaging modalities to acquire and operate. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Integrating an Image-Guided Robot with Intraoperative MRI

    Page(s): 59 - 65
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2615 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Microsurgical techniques, together with the introduction of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), established the need and the environment for the integration of robotics with surgery. In this article, we summarize our experience with intraoperative MRI on 781 neurosurgical patients. Intraoperative MRI demonstrated unsuspected residual pathology in up to 20% of patients. To take full advantage of the imaging environment, an magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible image-guided robot capable of both microsurgery and stereotaxy was designed and constructed. Unique features of the system include the use of non-ferromagnetic materials, an end effector that actuates standard surgical instrumentation, automated tool exchange, and haptic feedback. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • INNOMOTION for Percutaneous Image-Guided Interventions

    Page(s): 66 - 73
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1817 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This report describes the development of a robotic assistance system that provides precise and reproducible instrument positioning inside the MRI or CT gantry on the basis of processed imagery. Percutaneous interventions such as MRI-guided insertion of cannulae and probes for biopsy, drainage, drug delivery, and energetic tumor destruction were primary drivers in the robotic design. Applications involving the central nervous system have been excluded because of the demanding medical device regulations and approval process. The developed system received the Conformite Europeenne (CE) mark in 2005 and is marketed under the brand name INNOMOTION. It is currently in clinical use for MRl-guided sciatic pain and facet joint treatments, biopsies,drainages, and CT-guided osteosynthesis. This article reviews the development and evaluation of the system. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Comparing Mammographic Images

    Page(s): 74 - 81
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1011 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The main motivation in using intensity attributes to analyze and compare the technologies of mammography images acquisition is that such images are intrinsically of low contrast, which hinders the lesions detection and interpretation. Considering the viewing conditions, the study is under development to validate the influence of the contrast variation of many types of equipment on the radiologist's diagnosis. However, for the image processing, the contrast variation can be considered a problem affecting the detection of important structures. A large-intensity variation in a digitized image can be manipulated by image-processing techniques and aid in lesion detection. However, low-intensity variation, as observed in the images of full-field digital mammography systems, can impede the detection of some lesions types, as masses are structures of low contrast. Therefore, the new technologies should be tested and validated for an adequate calibration according to the procedures adjacent to the image acquisition itself. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The case of the tiny royalty [Patents]

    Page(s): 82
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (34 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Medicine, the borrower [Retrospectroscope]

    Page(s): 83 - 84
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (146 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Medicine has its three goals, curing a disease or arresting its progress, providing relief from pain and suffering, and rehabilitating with the minimum need of a caregiver. Medicine appropriates everything from every source that can be the slightest use to anybody who is ailing in any way or likely to be ailing from any cause. The modern biomedical engineer must be knowledgeable in biology, medicine, and engineering to recognize problems that can be solved by tools or techniques that can be borrowed to solve a medical problem. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Genetic engineering and stem cells: combinatorial approaches for cardiac cell therapy [Cellular/Tissue Engineering]

    Page(s): 85 - 88
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (77 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The use of genetic engineering to induce or alter specific protein expression in stem cells has already facilitated research in this field and may, additionally, offer a potential route for designing more efficient cell sources for cardiac repair. As the feasibility of stem cell genetic manipulation has already been proved and as genetic techniques continue to advance, the combinatorial approach for cardiac cell therapy is promising. This review will thus describe the applications of genetic engineering to improve the isolation, selection, and differentiation of stem cells prior to implantation as well as strategies to promote the retention, mobilization, survival, integration, and tracking of stem cells after implantation. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Moment-based approaches in imaging part 3: computational considerations [A Look at...]

    Page(s): 89 - 91
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (84 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper discusses the computation of moments in imaging. Faster algorithms are needed to decrease the computational complexity for real-time environment applications. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Book Reviews

    Page(s): 92 - 103
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (749 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • EMBS approves and encourages mentoring [GOLD]

    Page(s): 94
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (57 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Professional responsibility: politics, culture, and religion versus science and technology [Government Affairs]

    Page(s): 95 - 99
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (81 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Announcement

    Page(s): 100 - 101
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (2582 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine contains articles on current technologies and methods used in biomedical and clinical engineering.

 

This Magazine ceased publication in 2010. The current retitled publication is IEEE Pulse.

Full Aims & Scope